Latin American and U.S. Military Seeking Strategy Against Gangs and Drugs

first_imgBy Dialogo April 23, 2009 Representatives of the armed forces of Central America, the United States, and other Latin American countries met Wednesday in Honduras for a two-day meeting to draw up plans for combating gangs and drug trafficking rings, military chiefs reported. The meeting, with the slogan “Building for the Future, Providing an Alternative to Gangs and Drugs,” was inaugurated by the head of the Joint Chiefs of Staff of the Honduran Armed Forces, General Romeo Vásquez. “We are in a state of war against crime; the situation is not secure,” the general warned. Participants in this event included military officials from Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, the United States, Belize, the Dominican Republic, Mexico, and Colombia, as well as police representatives from Costa Rica and Panama (countries which have no armies). Vásquez admitted that the fight against juvenile gangs or “maras,” as well as against organized crime and drug trafficking, should be carried out with the cooperation between countries. He also stated that it is important that the United States, which already contributes to the region with the Merida Initiative, strengthen support for the fight against crime on the continent.last_img read more

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U.S. Charges Dutch FARC Member and 17 Other Guerrillas

first_img On 14 December, a U.S. court formally charged the Dutchwoman Tanja Anamary Nijmeijer and seventeen other Colombian FARC guerrillas with the kidnapping of three Americans, freed in 2008 together with former political leader Ingrid Betancourt. Nijmeijer, who is thirty-two years old, is the only European woman to have enrolled in the FARC’s ranks since the founding of the guerrilla group in 1964. Nijmeijer joined the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) in 2002, according to the Colombian authorities. A grand jury in the U.S. capital charged her, together with her seventeen colleagues, with kidnapping Marc Gonsalves, Keith Stansell, and Thomas Howes and holding them for more than five years, until they were rescued by the army, together with Betancourt, on 2 July 2008, the Department of Justice announced in a statement. The Dutch guerrilla was part of the group that was with the FARC’s top military commander, Jorge Briceño (alias ‘Mono Jojoy’), when he died during a bombardment by the Colombian army, on 22 September, according to intelligence reports. Her body has not been found, and the Colombian authorities affirm that they do not know her whereabouts. The U.S. indictment affirms, among other details, that the three Americans were occasionally moved to Venezuelan territory by the FARC in order to escape army harassment. It also affirms that the kidnapping victims “were taken to a meeting in 2003 with several senior members of the FARC’s Estado Mayor Central (Central General Staff), who told the Americans that their continued detention as U.S. citizens would assist the FARC’s goals by increasing international pressure on the government of Colombia to capitulate to the FARC’s demands.” Gonsalves, Stansell, and Howes were captured in February 2003, when their small plane crashed in the jungle, in FARC territory. The guerrillas immediately executed two of the five survivors of the accident: the pilot Thomas Janis, also an American, and a Colombian sergeant, Luis Alcides Cruz. The other three were held under “barbaric conditions” in the jungle, the text affirms. Colombia has already extradited to the United States one FARC guerrilla who participated in the kidnapping of Betancourt and the Americans, although the country’s Supreme Court later refused to extradite two other members of the FARC. The extradited guerrilla, Ricardo Palmera, alias “Simón Trinidad,” was sentenced to sixty years in prison in Washington, a penalty to which Nijmeijer and her acolytes could also be sentenced. By Dialogo December 16, 2010last_img read more

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Guatemalan President Extends State of Emergency in Area Dominated by Drug Traffickers

first_imgBy Dialogo January 21, 2011 Guatemalan President Álvaro Colom extended for thirty days the state of emergency decreed in the border department of Alta Verapaz (in northern Guatemala), where he launched a Christmas offensive against the Mexican drug-trafficking cartel Los Zetas. “The state of emergency will be extended for thirty days, because we still have some steps to take (to recover the territory), which had become a true center of operations for drug trafficking,” the president affirmed to reporters. He affirmed that in the thirty days that the state of emergency has been in effect in that region, on the border with Mexico, crime has dropped around 30%. In addition, more than eighty machine guns and assault rifles and forty-eight vehicles have been seized, and more than twenty people linked to drug trafficking have been arrested. The state of emergency was initially decreed on 19 December for a period of one month, restricting some constitutional rights, such as freedom of movement and organization. “We’re in the process of concluding that the state of emergency is starting to fulfill its objective: recovering governability in Alta Verapaz,” Interior Minister Carlos Menocal said for his part. According to the minister, the security forces have also seized the equivalent of more than a million dollars from criminal groups. According to the U.S. embassy in Guatemala, 250 tons of cocaine enter the United States annually by way of the so-called Central American Route, of which Guatemala is a part.last_img read more

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Honduras Hosts Regional Training Program for Air Forces of Five Countries

first_imgThe goal of the training is to prepare pilots to respond to emergency situations, avoid accidents, and maximize their efficiency and effectiveness, and all Military pilots are required to participate in refresher courses. “This flight, given to us free of charge, is a big help that has been facilitated to us from La Mosquitia, because we are very poor people, and it was impossible for us to travel,” López Martínez told the national newspaper La Tribuna. “Thank God we have been brought.” “The exchange of experiences is important,” Honduran Air Force Captain Gerson Ramos said. “This communication allows us to learn from each other and we end up better equipped to handle situations we may be involved in.” By Dialogo August 13, 2015 I don’t see what the fuss is. They think they’re Einstein. A vest adapted for Breasts and done. Respectfully. I want to know about a Honduran woman who died in Guatemala Honduras is hosting a regional training program for the air forces of five countries. The Conference of Central American Air Forces (CEFAC in Spanish) provided security training to close to two dozen pilots from the air forces of Honduras, Guatemala, El Salvador, Nicaragua and the Dominican Republic from July 30 to July 24.The Honduran Air Force is very well regarded internationally During the three-week seminar, pilots shared their experiences and engaged in instrumental and air navigation procedures, skills that are crucial in adverse weather conditions. “This type of training is vital so we can successfully complete our missions and not make mistakes in the future,” Capt. Ramos said. “We do not have a margin of error. Errors are tragic. We can’t afford the luxury of committing them.” Reducing accidents and improving efficiency A humanitarian mission to Tegucigalpa The Conference of Central American Forces (CEFAC) provided safety training for about two dozen pilots from the Air Forces of Honduras, Guatemala, El Salvador, Nicaragua, and the Dominican Republic between June 30 and July 24. The pilots responded positively to the training and the security standards, concluded Capt. Ramos.center_img One of the patients the pilots transported, Ana Ivis López Martínez, was grateful. “We have a program called Alas para la Salud — Wings for Health,” Capt. Ramos explained, with which the Air Force transports (by plane or helicopter) sick patients who may not have the means to travel and are usually from remote areas throughout Honduras to main hospitals in urban centers as well as during emergencies. “We have teams, always ready, seven days a week, 24 hours a day, for situations like these.” Such safety precautions are an important part of the humanitarian missions the Honduran Air Force carries out, sometimes on very short notice. CEFAC’s safety training is particularly relevant for missions in the Honduran capital, because Toncontín International Airport (TGU) in Tegucigalpa is a challenging facility for pilots to land in. The airstrip’s approach is considered difficult under the best weather conditions and even more challenging in inclement weather. “We are reaching almost 6,000 days without an accident,” thanks to strong security measures on the ground and in flight, Capt. Ramos added. “We always expect the unexpected. When it happens, our reaction needs to be immediate. We assist with search and rescue operations in open seas or when there are severe vehicle accidents in any of the nation’s highways. The lives of the people we transport also depend on our constant training.” Honduran Air Force pilots conducted the training, which was part of an ongoing CEFAC program at the Honduran Air Force’s Hernán Acosta Mejía Base, in Tegucigalpa, to help Military pilots in the region hone their skills in safety procedures. The organization holds training programs in different countries and conducts training in Honduras annually. In June, Air Force pilots flew 15 people from La Mosquitia to Tegucigalpa, where they underwent eye surgery before being transported back to their home. “Pilot training is one of our strengths,” Honduran Armed Forces spokesman, Colonel José Antonio Sánchez, said. “Our Air Force’s history dates back to 1934, so we have the necessary labs, equipment, and schools to hold these training sessions. Furthermore, because of the relationship we sustain with the U.S. Armed Forces, our instructors have studied in the United States and have the credentials to provide the training. Our aim is to increase the proficiency of our pilots and that of our guests.” last_img read more

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Judges may not sit on panels with fiscal oversight of government funds

first_img November 1, 2001 Regular News A judge may not serve as an appointed member of a municipal commission that is charged with fiscal oversight of government funds, according to the Judicial Ethics Advisory Committee. The inquiring judge has been asked by the mayor where he serves to be a member of the city’s children’s commission. Its responsibilities are to “make final decisions on the commission’s funding strategy and grant making.” Opinion Number: 2001-16. In addition, the commission’s “two-prong approach” is to “prevent problems before they occur and ensure accountability for the public dollars granted to programs.” “In recent opinions, this committee has answered numerous inquiries from judges who are concerned about their inability to participate in events or organizations with admittedly admirable goals,” the panel said. “The concern continues to be the isolation that judges suffer because of the Code of Judicial Conduct; they feel adherence to the code separates them from the mainstream of their communities.” The committee said it has rendered several opinions regarding the participation of judges on civic boards and commissions and in each case the answer has been structured and affected by the responsibilities of the board or commission in question. Canon 5C(3) permits a judge to serve as a director of a charitable or civic organization not conducted for profit subject to certain limitations and other requirements of the Code. The code even permits the judge to participate in the management and investment of the organization’s funds. “The committee has previously opined that it is permissible for a judge to serve on the board of a supervised visitation program under the theory that such a program is “tangentially related to the courts,” the panel said. “However it should be noted that the funds were raised on behalf of a private not-for-profit corporation.” This matter, the panel said, is better governed by Canon 5C(2) which states: “A judge shall not accept appointment to a governmental committee or commission or other governmental position that is concerned with issues of fact or policy on matters other than the improvement of the law, the legal system or the administration of justice.” “The Committee is not unmindful that participation by judges on many committees and commissions may be justified as being tangentially related to the justice system or the improvement of the law,” the ethics panel said. “It is this ‘justification’ through the exceptions stated in Canon 5C(2), which has in some instances blurred the distinction between the branches of government.” This blurring, which Canon 5C(2) was adopted to prevent, affects the public’s perception of the independence of the courts from the executive and legislative branches of government, the panel said, adding the commentary to Canon 5C(2) states that the purpose of the prohibition is “to protect the courts from involvement in extra-judicial matters that may prove to be controversial. Judges should not accept governmental appointments that are likely to interfere with the effectiveness and independence of the judiciary.” In this inquiry, the committee said, the judge described the commission in question as one which involves itself in the granting of government funds and overseeing their use. “This is a clear responsibility of the executive branch, no different than the operations of the police and fire departments,” the panel said. “Although a creative justification as tangentially relating to the justice system may be made, the committee believes that the judge’s participation would be a clear violation of Canon 5C(2) and advises the inquiring judge to decline the appointment being offered.” The Judicial Ethics Advisory Committee is expressly charged with rendering advisory opinions interpreting the application of the Code of Judicial Conduct to specific circumstances confronting or affecting a judge or judicial candidate. Its opinions are advisory, and conduct that is consistent with an opinion may be evidence of good faith on the part of the judge, but the Judicial Qualifications Commission is not bound by the committee’s interpretive opinions. The full text of the opinions is available on the Supreme Court’s website at www.flcourts.org. Once there, click on the “Judges’ Page” link. Judges may not sit on panels with fiscal oversight of government fundscenter_img Judges may not sit on panels with fiscal oversight of government fundslast_img read more

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Small claims rules amendments

first_imgSmall claims rules amendments Small claims rules amendments The Florida Bar’s Small Claims Rules Committee has filed with the Florida Supreme Court its regular-cycle report of proposed amendments to the Florida Small Claims Rules. The committee proposes amendments to rules 7.080 (Service of Pleadings and Papers Other Than Statement of Claim); 7.090 (Appearance; Defensive Pleadings; Trial Date); 7.322 (Summons/Notice to Appear for Pretrial Conference); 7.340 (Final Judgment); and 7.343 (Fact Information Sheet). The committee also proposes new rule 7.175 (Motions for Costs and Attorneys’ Fees) and new forms 7.335 (Statement of Claim (for Return of Stolen Property)) and 7.350 (Corporate Authorization to Allow Employee to Represent Corporation at any Stage of Lawsuit). The court invites all interested persons to comment on the committee’s proposed amendments. A summary of the amendments is provided below. The amendments also are reproduced in full online at www.floridasupremecourt.org/decisions/proposed.shtml. An original and nine paper copies of all comments must be filed with the Court on or before April 1, with a certificate of service verifying that a copy has been served on the committee chair, Judge Pauline Drayton, Duval County Courthouse, 330 E. Bay Street, Jacksonville 32202-2921, as well as a separate request for oral argument if the person filing the comment wishes to participate in oral argument, which may be scheduled for June. Further, if comments are directed to proposed new form 7.175, Motions for Costs and Attorneys’ Fees, the certificate of service shall also verify that a copy has been served on the proponent of the amendment, Judge Patti Christensen, 4010 Louis Speedway, Suite 244, St. Augustine 32084-6220. If comments are directed to proposed new form 7.335, Statement of Claim (for Return of Stolen Property), the certificate of service shall also verify that a copy has been served on the proponent of the amendment, Deborah Schroth, Florida Legal Services, Inc., 126 W. Adams Street, Suite 502, Jacksonville 32202-3849. The chair has until April 15 to file a response to any comments filed with the court. The proponents of new forms 7.175 and 7.335 have until April 15, 2005, to file responses to any comments filed in connection with those proposals. Electronic copies of all comments and the responses also must be filed in accordance with the Court’s Administrative Order In Re: Mandatory Submission of Electronic Copies of Documents, Fla. Admin. Order No. AOSC04-84 (Sept. 13, 2004). Please label envelope to avoid erasure. IN THE SUPREME COURT OF FLORIDA AMENDMENTS TO THE FLORIDA SMALL CLAIMS RULES (TWO YEAR CYCLE), CASE NO. SC05-146 March 1, 2005 Regular Newslast_img read more

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August 1, 2005 On the Move

first_imgAugust 1, 2005 On the Move August 1, 2005 On the Move On the Move Patrick H. Willis has joined the law firm of Fisher, Rushmer, Werrenrath, Dickson, Talley & Dunlap as a new associate. Michael Seese joined Kluger, Peretz, Kaplan & Berlin in the firm’s bankruptcy and creditors’ rights group. Dion J. Cassata and John J. Hanson announce the opening of Cassata & Hanson with offices at 1250 E. Hallandale Beach Blvd., Suite 607, Hallandale Beach 33009; phone (954) 364-7803; fax (954) 251-4787; Web site www.cassatahanson.com; e-mail thefirm@cassatahanson.com. The firm focuses on matters of employment law including overtime issues, wage disputes, discrimination, medical leave, EEOC matters, and harassment. Luis Perez and Carlos Deupi have joined the Miami office of Hogan & Hartson as partner and counsel, respectively. Perez has extensive experience in matters related to corporate and international law, and mergers and acquisitions. Deupi advises clients on corporate and securities law, mergers and acquisitions, international transactions, and real estate investment transactions. Lynn M. Dannheisser joined Gunster, Yoakley & Stewart as a shareholder. Her practice areas include real estate, local government, and land use law. Philip Irish joined Hagen & Hagen in Ft. Lauderdale as of counsel assisting with general commercial litigation matters. Lori K. Mans, Rupesh J. Patel and Melanie Lastrapes joined the Jacksonville office of Constangy, Brooks and Smith as associates. Jodi A. Fischer announces the opening of The Law Offices of Ms. Jodi A. Fischer at 12411 Southwest First Place, Plantation 33325; phone (954) 317-6931. Fischer concentrates in the areas of private insurance disability in state and federal arenas, ERISA and health law, and community association law. Buckingham, Doolittle & Burroughs announced its merger with the Law Offices of Pheterson & Bleau, which concentrates in labor and employment law, business, executive contract work and negotiation, complex litigation, and administrative law. The firm will continue to be known as Buckingham, Doolittle & Burroughs. Anneli Nystrand Magee joined as in-house counsel at Linderand, Inc., a real estate developer in Tallahassee. Justin C. Leto joined Goldfarb & Gold in Miami. Leto focuses his practice on complex civil litigation including personal injury, wrongful death, premises liability, product liability, motor vehicle accidents, and medical malpractice. Gregory C. Ward and Jay Kim have formed WardKim and practice in the areas of commercial litigation and personal injury. WardKim’s new address is One Financial Plaza, Suite 2600, Ft. Lauderdale 33394; phone (954) 527-1115. Ron Baskin and Jennifer Taylor joined Akerman Senterfitt as associates in Miami. Baskin’s practice focuses on creditor’s rights and debtor’s estate administration. Taylor focuses on labor and employment law, litigation of civil rights and employment-related claims. Erin E. Dardis joined the law firm of Abadin Jaramillo Cook & Heffernan in Miami. Dardis concentrates in the areas of general civil litigation, insurance defense, and appellate work. Schoeppl & Burke announces its new location at 4651 North Federal Highway, Boca Raton 33431-5133; phone (561) 394-8301. The firm concentrates in the areas of securities litigation and arbitration, regulatory defense, appellate, federal trial, and complex business litigation. In addition, Adam D. Palmer has joined the firm as of counsel and practices business-related litigation and securities arbitration. Kara S. Nickel joined the law firm of Stearns Weaver Miller Weissler Alhadeff & Sitterson as an associate in the labor and employment department in Miami, and Jason A. Post joined the Miami office as an associate in the real estate department. Sandra I. Murado announces the relocation of her office to 999 Ponce de Leon Blvd., Suite 740, Coral Gables 33134; phone (305) 448-4300; fax (305) 448-4300; e-mail: sandra@muradolaw.com. The firm concentrates in immigration and nationality matters. Juan C. Villaveces joined Abel Band in Sarasota as an associate in the firm’s real estate practice. Beverly Thomson Shaw has opened her own elder law practice located at 5001 9th Ave. North, St. Petersburg 33710; phone (727) 327-9222. J. Ray Poole joined the Jacksonville office of Constangy, Brooks, and Smith as an associate. Poole joins the employment law and litigation practice. Daniel E. Faggard joined Porter, Wright, Morris & Arthur in Naples as an associate in the litigation department. Peter S. Baumberger was named a member of the Miami firm of Rossman Baumberger Reboso & Spier. Baumberger handles claims involving wrongful death, admiralty, products liability, premises liability, medical negligence, as well as commercial litigation. Robin Taylor Symons joined Epstein Becker & Green as a member of the firm in the law firm’s national labor and employment practice in the Miami office. Alexander P. Heckler joined the Ft. Lauderdale office of Shutts & Bowen as a member of the firm’s governmental law practice group. Bradley S. Shraiberg and Leslie S. Osborne joined Kluger, Peretz, Kaplan & Berlin to head its Palm Beach County bankruptcy and creditors’ rights practice in Boca Raton. Tamara Kulyk Holden has joined The Law Offices of Justin G. Joseph and practices primarily in the areas of mobile home law and family law. Tim Benter was promoted to vice president and associate general counsel at Republic Services, Inc. John Wilke and Jonathan Brooks announce the formation of Wilke & Brooks located at 1800 NW Corp. Blvd., Suite 310, Boca Raton 33431; phone (561) 353-0999. Humberto Ocariz has joined John Golden and Mark Grimes to form Golden, Grimes & Ocariz, a law practice representing foreign and domestic clients in matters of product liability, employment, personal injury defense, real estate, and complex commercial litigation. The firm was previously known as Golden & Grimes. John C. Rockwell joined Jerry Coleman in Key West as an associate. Rockwell practices in the areas of real estate, contracts, and litigation. Joseph R. Furst joined Ratzan & Alters in Miami as an associate. Furst focuses his practice on cases involving medical malpractice, wrongful death, and catastrophic personal injury claims. William P. Burns joined Abel, Band, Russell, Collier, Pitchford & Gordon in Sarasota in the firm’s employment law practice group. James O. Cunningham announces the opening of his firm located at 3117 Edgewater Drive, Orlando 32804; phone 407-425-2000. The firm concentrates in the area of plaintiff’s personal injury and wrongful death litigation. Glen H. Waldman joined Bilzin Sumberg as a partner. Waldman concentrates in reinsurance law and complex commercial litigation. Juan-Carlos Planas joined Pathman Lewis in Miami. Planas concentrates his practice in litigation, land use and zoning, and automobile dealership law. Carolann Mazza, P.A., has relocated its offices to The Advocate Building, Suite 200, 315 S.E. 7th Street, Ft. Lauderdale 33301; phone (954)527-4634; fax (954)527-4634; e-mail: carolannmazza@bellsouth.net. The firm concentrates in the areas of family law, criminal law, and general litigation. Becker & Poliakoff announces Ft. Lauderdale office attorneys Grace N. Manne, Bradley J. Gross, and Donna D. Berger have been promoted to shareholders of the firm. Lisa Clements joined the Miami office of Rumberger, Kirk & Caldwell as an associate practicing in the areas of commercial litigation and general liability. Herschel Gavsie, Michael Weiss, Todd Feldman, and Evan Klinek joined Greenspoon Marder Hirschfeld Rafkin Ross Berger & Abrams Anton as associates in the Ft. Lauderdale office. Iraima C. La Nuez has joined Akerman Senterfitt as an associate in the Miami office’s corporate practice group. Additionally, Gerald W. Pierre joined the firm as of counsel in the private client services group. Robert D. Brown announces the opening of Robert D. Brown, P.A., in Miami. The firm concentrates on litigation including personal injury, nursing home, and general tort & commercial litigation. Sherry L. Hyman announces the relocation of her office to 3801 PGA Blvd, Suite 107, Palm Beach Gardens 33410; phone (561)744-7231; fax (561)744-3041; e-mail: slhyman@aol.com. Jeffrey M. Novell and Ronald Pena were elected partners of Hinshaw & Culbertson. Novell, of the Tampa office, concentrates his practice on workers’ compensation insurance defense litigation. Pena, of the Miami office, practices in the areas of civil and commercial litigation, with an emphasis on general liability litigation as well as the defense of transportation companies. Steven A. Grigas has joined GrayRobinson in the firm’s Tallahassee office as of counsel. Additionally, three attorneys joined the firm in Orlando: V. Nicholas Dancaescu, eminent domain; Grant A. Kuvin, medical malpractice defense, general liability defense, and construction litigation; and Marc D. Pelzman, eminent domain. Clifford R. Repperger, Jr. , has also joined the firm as of counsel in Melbourne. Repperger concentrates his practice on administrative, land use, and local and state government law.last_img read more

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Patchogue Sex Attack Suspect Sought by Cops

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Have you seen this man?Suffolk County police released a photo of a suspect wanted for sexually abusing and robbing a woman in Patchogue over the weekend.The 24-year-old victim was walking westbound on the south side of Main Street when the assailant grabbed her from behind her and dragging her into a wooded area between West Avenue and River Avenue at 3:15 a.m. Saturday, police said.The assailant assaulted, robbed and sexually abused the victim, who suffered cuts, bruises and a broken nose. She was treated and released at a local hospital.Investigators suspect Main Street was crowded Friday night into Saturday morning and that numerous people may have encountered the suspect before or after the attack. He may have fled eastbound on Main Street.The suspect is described as a tall, light-skinned Hispanic or black man with a thin build in his 20s. He was wearing a black t-shirt, dark colored jeans and a wool ski type hat.Police noted that there have been no other similar incidents reported in the area.Fifth Squad detectives ask anyone with information on this case to call them at 631-854-8552 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-220-TIPS. All calls will be kept confidential.last_img read more

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Long Island Snow Storm to Bring 1-4 Inches

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Snow plows clear Union Boulevard in Islip on Tuesday, Jan. 21, 2014.One-to-two inches of snow is forecast to fall Tuesday night on Long Island, with up to four inches possible on the East End amid the third arctic blast this month.There’s a 60-percent chance that flakes will start falling after midnight through 10 a.m. Wednesday while temperatures hit a low of 13 overnight, according to the National Weather Service.“Low pressure passing south and east of the area tonight into Wednesday will bring the potential for a light snow event,” Upton-based NWS meteorologists said in a hazardous weather outlook statement.The snow comes as subfreezing temperatures and subzero wind chills brought on by the return of the polar vortex bring the risk of hypothermia, bursting pipes and icy roadways.The clouds are expected to break later Wednesday morning with a high near 27 before dropping down to 16 after sundown. Thursday is expected to be the last day of the big chill with a high near 31 and a low of 24 overnight into Friday.A slight chance snow flurries and rain is possible Friday into Saturday, when temps top freezing and the forecast is expected to clear up, giving way to cloudy skies near 40 in time for Superbowl Sunday at Metlife Stadium in New Jersey.last_img read more

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North Amityville Man Charged With Murder

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A suspect has been arrested for allegedly killing a Missouri man and wounding two others in a shooting in North Amityville over the weekend, Suffolk County police said.Jakyma Bunn was charged Sunday with second-degree murder, assault and criminal possession of a weapon.Homicide Squad detectives alleged that the 38-year-old suspect fatally shot Louis Wilson, 44, of Kansas City, and wounded two fellow North Amityville residents on Coolidge Avenue at 2 a.m. Saturday.Bunn, who suffered non-life-threatening injuries during the shooting, is scheduled to be arraigned Monday at First District Court in Central Islip.last_img

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