Andrew Garfield Set for Angels in America at National Theatre

first_imgAndrew Garfield(Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images) Spider-Man is heading to the boards! Andrew Garfield will headline Tony Kushner’s Angels in America at the U.K.’s National Theatre next year. Other big names attached to upcoming productions include Harry Potter alums Ralph Fiennes and Helen McCrory, playwright David Hare and Crucible and Bridge director Ivo van Hove.In May 2017, Marianne Elliott will direct Kushner’s Angels in America, with Garfield returning to the National (he was last there in 2006) as Prior Walter. Millennium Approaches, the first of the two plays which comprise Kushner’s landmark work, received its British premiere at the Cottesloe in 1992 in Declan Donnellan’s original production, and was joined by Perestroika in a double-bill the following year.Jonathan Kent’s acclaimed Chichester Festival Theatre trilogy, Young Chekhov—the playwright’s early plays Platonov, Ivanov and The Seagull, in new versions by Hare, will begin performances at the Olivier Theatre from July. Opening night is set for August 3 and actors tapped for the project include Anna Chancellor, James McArdle and Geoffrey Streatfeild.Peter Shaffer’s Amadeus will open in the Olivier Theatre in October, with Lucian Msamati as Salieri. It is set to be followed in the venue by Sally Cookson’s Peter Pan, which is scheduled to begin performances in November. Also slated for the auditorium is Twelfth Night. Led by Tamsin Greig, the production will begin in February 2017. It is the first of two Shakespearean plays being directed by Simon Godwin, who will later helm Fiennes in Antony and Cleopatra early in 2018. Other shows that will be staged at the Olivier include Les Blancs and The Threepenny Opera (in a new translation by Simon Stephens, starring Rory Kinnear).Returning to the Lyttelton Theatre, The Red Barn, a new play by Hare based on Georges Simenon’s novel La Main, is scheduled to open at the venue in October, helmed by Robert Icke. Broadway director of the moment van Hove will come to the National for the first time to direct Ibsen’s Hedda Gabler, opening in December at the Lyttelton. Also heading for that theater’s boards is McCrory, who will appear in Carrie Cracknell’s production of The Deep Blue Sea by Terence Rattigan, officially opening on June 8. Other shows set for the venue include The Plough and the Stars and The Suicide.Additional productions to look forward to: Our Ladies of Perpetual Succour, A Pacifist’s Guide to the War on Cancer, Love, Consent, Sunset at the Villa Thalia and Mosquitoes, all at the Dorfman Theatre. Over at the Temporary Theatre there’s Another World: Losing Our Children to Islamic State, The Solid Life of Sugar Water and Brainstorm.And of note: British comedian (and national treasure) Sir Lenny Henry has been appointed to the NT Board. View Commentslast_img read more

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Kelsey Grammer to Join Alfie Boe for Finding Neverland’s West End Bow

first_img Finding Neverland A couple Neverland stars have been tapped to shine bright on the West End. Kelsey Grammer, who originated the role of Charles Frohman in Finding Neverland, as well as Alfie Boe, who will begin Broadway performances as J.M. Barrie beginning March 29, will next headline the West End transfer, according to the Daily Mail. The Broadway.com Audience Choice Award-winning tuner is currently eyeing a January 2017 London bow.Boe concluded his Broadway turn as Jean Valjean in Les Miserables on February 28. He made his Broadway debut as Rodolfo in Baz Luhrmann’s La Boheme, for which he and his co-stars received a special Tony Award in 2003. He played the role of Valjean in the 25th Anniversary Concert at London’s O2 Arena in October 2010 and went on to lead the original West End production of the show. Grammer’s additional stage credits include La Cage Aux Folles, for which he earned a Tony nod, Macbeth and Othello. He is a four-time Emmy winner for Frasier.Featuring a score by Gary Barlow and Eliot Kennedy and a book by James Graham, Finding Neverland follows the story of J.M. Barrie and his relationship with the family of widow Sylvia Llewelyn Davies. Llewelyn Davies’ children eventually became Barrie’s inspiration to write Peter Pan. The Diane Paulus-helmed production opened on Broadway in spring 2015 following an out-of-town run at the American Repertory Theater in Cambridge, Massachusetts.Further information, including additional casting, exact dates and venue, will be announced at a later date. Kelsey Grammer(Photo: Bruce Glikas) Related Showscenter_img View Comments Show Closed This production ended its run on Aug. 21, 2016last_img read more

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Watch Laura Benanti Impersonate Melania Trump

first_imgLaura Benanti Star Files Laura Benanti She Loves Me Related Showscenter_img Never let it be said that Laura Benanti doesn’t listen to her Twitter followers. The Tony winner is currently giving as sweet as “Vanilla Ice Cream” performance in She Loves Me, however in case stage and screen roles dry up, her fans have suggested an alternative source of income: impersonating Melania Trump. “She’s my meal ticket,” Benanti told Stephen Colbert on The Late Show on March 28. Check out the hysterical video below as she proves just why; She Loves Me is playing at Roundabout’s Studio 54 through June 5, also starring Zachary Levi, Jane Krakowski and more. View Comments Show Closed This production ended its run on July 10, 2016last_img read more

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Watch Alisan Porter Perform ‘Somewhere’ on The Voice

first_img There’s a place for her in the finals! Broadway alum Alisan Porter returned to her musical theater roots on May 23 in the first part of The Voice’s season 10 finale. Porter, who made her Great White Way debut as Bebe in the 2006 revival of A Chorus Line, performed “Somewhere” from West Side Story, as well as Carole King’s “You’ve Got a Friend” opposite her coach Christina Aguilera. Take a look below at both performances to see why Porter earned a spot in the top four. The second part of the finale airs on NBC on May 24; we hope she gets it! View Comments Alisan Porter on ‘The Voice’last_img

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Au Revoir to B’way! An American in Paris Sets Closing Date

first_img Breaking up is hard to do. An American in Paris will shutter on Broadway on January 1, 2017; at time of closing, the production will have played 29 previews and 719 regular performances. Based on the Oscar-winning film, the musical of hope, redemption and romance officially opened at the Palace Theatre on April 12, 2015.Directed and choreographed by Christopher Wheeldon, the tuner tells the tale of a young American soldier, a beautiful French girl and an indomitable European city, each yearning for a new beginning in the aftermath of war.An American in Paris features music by George and Ira Gershwin with a book by Craig Lucas. The show includes the songs “I Got Rhythm,” “‘S Wonderful,” “But Not For Me,” “Stairway to Paradise,” “Our Love Is Here To Stay,” “They Can’t Take That Away” and orchestral music including “Concerto in F,” “2nd Prelude,” “2nd Rhapsody” and “An American In Paris.” The score has been adapted, arranged and supervised by Rob Fisher.The cast currently includes Garen Scribner, Leanne Cope, Veanne Cox, Jill Paice, Brandon Uranowitz and Max Von Essen.Scribner is set to depart the production on July 17 to lead the national tour of the tuner from October; he will be replaced by Dimitri Kleioris. A London transfer will open in March next year led by original stars Robert Fairchild and Cope.Broadway.com customers with tickets to canceled performances will be contacted with information on refunds or exchanges. An American in Paris View Comments Show Closed This production ended its run on Oct. 9, 2016center_img Related Shows Leanne Cope in ‘An American in Paris'(Photo: Angela Sterling)last_img read more

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Engagements Will Extend Off-Broadway

first_img View Comments Good news for our recent #LiveatFive guest Jennifer Kim! The New York premiere of Engagements will extend off-Broadway through August 20; the production was previously scheduled to run through August 14. Directed by Kimberly Senior and penned by Lucy Teitler, the dark comedy is in previews at Second Stage Theatre’s McGinn/Cazale Theatre uptown and will open officially on August 4.Along with Kim, the cast includes Ana Nogueira, Omar Maskati, Michael Stahl-David and Brooke Weisman as Catherine.It’s summer in New England and every weekend is someone else’s engagement party. The wildflowers, specialty cocktails, and artisanal appetizers are totally Instagram-worthy, but the people are not quite so perfect. One night, Lauren takes it into her own hands to make sure that her best friend doesn’t marry an inadequate suitor—a drunken mistake that incites a cascade of calamities, threatening to expose all of Lauren’s secrets. Omar Maskati, Jennifer Kim, Ana Nogueira, Brooke Weisman & Michael Stahl-David in ‘Engagements'(Photo: Joan Marcus)last_img read more

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Prepare Garden Tools for Winter

first_imgYour garden may be about ready for a long winter’s nap, but your work isn’t done.Don’t forget to tuck your gardening tools into bed for the winter, too. A little bit ofattention now will reap rewards of years of good service from gardening tools.It’s hard to know when to call the gardening season quits in some years. Just when wethink we’ve mowed the lawn for the last time, a couple of weeks of mild temperatures bringback the green blades of grass. Newly planted flowers, trees and shrubs should be wateredthoroughly every week or so until the cold really sets in, especially if rainfall isscarce.As cold or freezing temperatures come, prepare your tools by giving them a thoroughcleaning. Those steel wool barbecue-grill scrubbing pads are great for removing caked-onsoil from shovels, hoes, trowels and spades.Scrub the blades and handles with soap and water. Allow them to dry completely beforestoring. Rub a little linseed oil or similar protector over wood handles to keep the woodfrom drying and splitting. Sharpen your tools now to ensure a quick start in spring.Drain water from garden hoses and sprinklers. Hang them to dry before coiling the hosesfor storage. Replace washers and repair leaks. Hoses left outdoors during the winter couldcrack and split, especially if they still have water inside.Rinse and dry your fertilizer/pesticide spreader and oil all moving parts. Rinsesprayers and allow them to drip dry before storing. The best way to dispose of unusedchemicals in the sprayer is to apply the product as directed on the label.Store unused pesticides in their original containers with the label intact. Place allpesticides away from children and pets, either in a locked cabinet or on a shelf at leastfour feet off the ground. Protect pesticides from freezing temperatures and excessiveheat.When you think your lawn has seen its last mowing this year, run your mower until it isout of fuel. Changing the mower’s spark plug and sharpening the blade now will save yousome time next spring. Some products are now available to help stabilize fuel so it can bestored over winter, but I still recommend you drain it or use up the leftover fuel.Use up or drain fuel from the garden tiller before storing. If your equipment has a4-cycle engine, drain and replace the crankcase oil. Clean the machine by scraping offmatted grass and wiping off accumulated oil. Lubricate moving parts as the manufacturerdirects.Now you can finally relax and enjoy the fruits of your gardening labor. Curl up next tothe fireplace with your favorite gardening catalog and order new plants for spring. Andread the many gardening publications from your county Extension Service agent.last_img read more

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Independent Together.

first_imgGeorgia oilseed farmers hope a new-generation cooperative foroilseeds will help them bring money and jobs into rural Georgia.The co-op is now in the early stages of development.The co-op will market oilseed (canola, soybean, cotton and peanut)products to grocery or other retail outlets. A meeting for farmersinterested in the co-op is scheduled May 3 at the Georgia FarmBureau building in Macon, Ga. “This will bring the farmers a greater dollar value and infusejobs and money into Georgia’s rural economy,” said RandyHudson, coordinator of the Emerging Crops and Technologies Centerof the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and EnvironmentalSciences.And the Study Says A UGA CAES study funded by the governor’s office says such a facilitycould be built and economically supported in Georgia. The crushingand refining facility would primarily convert seeds from canolaand soybeans into oils. But it could handle cotton and peanuts,too.To get the facility up and running, according to the study, wouldcost about $56 million. However, it would add about $172 millionin economic activity to the Georgia economy.Running the facility at full capacity would take about 250,000acres of oilseed, said George Shumaker, a UGA Extension Serviceeconomist. Besides the 53 jobs it would create directly, about1,100 jobs would be created indirectly, mostly in rural Georgia.Domestic Market Battle Most of the canola used in the United States comes from Canada.This new facility will help Georgia farmers compete for the domesticcanola market, Hudson said.Canola oil is the preferred oil for many uses because it doesn’tchange the taste of food, Hudson said. It’s used for home cooking,bakeries and salad oils, and some restaurants fry foods with it.Forming a farmer-owned canola facility in Georgia would have littleeffect on the price of canola oil for consumers, Shumaker said.But farmers will have to come together for such a facility towork, said Marty McLendon, a Calhoun County farmer who has growncanola in the past.Independent Together “We want to remain individuals, but we have to be independenttogether,” McLendon said. “We have to have a large numberof growers join forces and get a supply large enough that we canhave a stable supply on the grocery store shelf. That’s the onlyway we’re going to survive farming.”If we can get a plant or processing facility to let thefarmers gain more control in the marketplace,” McLendon said,”it’s got very good potential. We’ve got to get a marketestablished. That’s the main holdback for the expansion of canola.”Growing and selling canola won’t turn around the current farmcrisis “by any means,” McLendon said. “We can’tgrow enough to do that. But it would be another tool in the diversityof agriculture. (It) gives us something else to work with.”last_img read more

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Wetter Weather.

first_img“The rains could not have come on a more timely basis,” said John Beasley, a peanut agronomist with the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. “Those fields needed the rain as soon as possible. And hopefully, most of them got what they have needed.”Peanuts Bounce BackPeanut plants can generally handle early-season drought stress and bounce back if they get enough rain later in the season, he said.Georgia’s peanut crop is worth about $350 million annually.Though heavy at times, the recent rain has fallen mostly as scattered thunderstorms. That means some folks have gotten less than others or no rain at all.”There are still a few areas that have not gotten the rainfall they need,” Beasley said.But in the fifth straight year of drought, Georgia farmers will take any rain anywhere right now.The state’s peanut crop is now entering the part of the growing season when it needs the most water, Beasley said. It will need about two inches a week for the next six to eight weeks.”Rarely do we get that rainfall pattern,” Beasley said. “Irrigation is needed to make up the difference.”Good growing conditions last year benefitted this year, too. The peanut crop grown last year for seed was excellent, he said, giving this year’s crop a good head start.However, dry weather late this spring delayed planting into late May and early June. This early dry weather opened the gates to some insects and disease, causing crop damage in places, he said.It also looks as if the number of cases of tomato spotted wilt virus will be very heavy again this year, Beasley said. Georgia farmers have been battling TSWV for many years. It can cause severe crop loss.But many farmers have reduced potential damage of the virus by following the guidelines of the UGA TSWV Risk Index.”This year I would have to say the majority of the Georgia peanut belt is in good shape,” Beasley said.Comfortable CottonMuch like peanuts, Georgia’s cotton crop needed the recent rains, said to Steve Brown, a UGA cotton agronomist.”In many places the crop is in good shape,” Brown said. “But the showers have been scattered. And those areas that have missed altogether are reaching the point of desperation. Some are even past the point of desperation. In those places, the crop is essentially finished.”The cotton crop has reached the bloom stage of development. As is the case with peanuts, getting enough moisture becomes critical during this time.”Generally, prospects are good if we receive broad rain frequently in the coming weeks,” Brown said.Tiny early-season insects known as thrips were particularly tough this year. “But we’re past that now,” he said.An unusually high number of aphids have surprised some cotton farmers. Aphids can suck the life out of cotton plants. But there’s something out there now keeping the population in check, Brown said.”A biological control for aphids, a naturally occurring fungus, is beginning to knock aphid populations down,” he said. “We rarely spray for them. We routinely rely on this fungus to eliminate them.”July marks the beginning “of real insect problems” in cotton, he said. For the next six to seven weeks, farmers and cotton scouts will have to be vigilant.last_img read more

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Thrips threat

first_imgThrips don’t like cold weather. They stop reproducing and become dormant when temperatures sink below 50 degrees. But it takes a few days of hard-freezing temperatures to kill them, he said. Thrips have liked the recent warm weather in south Georgia, leading to the higher numbers, he said. Daytime temperatures in the region reached the mid- to upper-70s in late December and January – 10 degrees to 15 degrees above normal.When temperatures get this high, thrips that survive winter become active. They’re hungry and ready to reproduce. A female thrips can produce five to 90 more female thrips. Each can reach maturity in about two weeks and produce another 5 to 90 more. A field of peppers, for example, could have 10 million thrips per acre by April, Riley said. And that’s a conservative number.Cool weather returned to south Georgia in the past week. This could suppress thrips’ activity. But what is believed to be their favorite food has emerged, too. Pine pollen now covers most fields, homes and cars in south Georgia, ready to give thrips a nutritious springtime kick once warm weather returns.No curePrevention is the only cure for TSWV. Once a plant gets it, it will die or yield little. To protect their crops, farmers can spend more money for TSWV-resistant crop varieties and insecticidal sprays to control thrips. Many farmers grow vegetables in fields of raised beds wrapped in plastic film. This helps farmers better control the crop environment. Most use black film. But some use metallic film, which disorients thrips and keeps them from landing on crops’ leaves. It costs about $150 more per acre to use.TSWV was bad last year. It cost Georgia tobacco farmers about $10 million in damage and control costs. It was tough on peanuts, too, reaching levels not seen since the late 1990s, when it cost farmers about $45 million in damage.“Based on the thrips survey data,” Riley said, “the disease could be strong this year and become a problem earlier.”To learn more about TSWV or the survey, go to the Web site at www.caes.uga.edu/topics/diseases/tswv/.A farmer who would like to have his area sampled should contact the local UGA Cooperative Extension office at 1-800-ASK-UGA1. By Brad HaireUniversity of GeorgiaThrips, tiny insects that can carry a deadly crop disease, have weathered south Georgia’s winter better than usual. Farmers should think about taking precautions this spring, says an expert with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. Thrips can get the tomato spotted wilt virus from an infected plant when they are nymphs. When they get older, they can carry the disease to other plants as they feed, said David Riley, a CAES research entomologist in Tifton, Ga.The severity of the disease can vary from year to year. Over the past two decades, TSWV has cost Georgia farmers hundreds of millions of dollars in damage to crops like peanuts, tobacco, peppers and tomatoes.“Conditions in south Georgia are developing to an increased risk of tomato spotted wilt virus this spring,” he said.Thrips count Two years ago, Riley and his research assistants began to keep track of thrips in Brooks, Colquitt, Decatur and Tift counties in south Georgia, the region where most of the peanut, tobacco and vegetable crops are planted.They collect weed samples monthly from two sites in each county. They collect every two weeks during the months leading to spring planting, he said.Thrips numbers are running high, he said, twice those taken this time last year from Colquitt and Tift counties. Five percent of the weeds sampled in these counties are infected with TSWV. Based on research, anything above 2 percent now would indicate a risky year ahead.The numbers in Brooks and Decatur counties are about the same as last year. last_img read more

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