Debate: Should rugby players eat sugar?

first_imgDURBAN, SOUTH AFRICA – JUNE 05: Dylan Hartley takes a drink during the England training session held at Northwood Crusaders on June 5, 2012 in Durban, South Africa. (Photo by David Rogers/Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS RW What foods and drinks should we avoid?ML: Fizzy drinks, smoothies, fruit juice, fruit yoghurts, cakes and pastries, and probiotic drinks. Some probiotic yoghurt drinks contains 17g of sugar!RW: Is sugar ever good for you?ML: Yes. Fruit sugar, or fructose, has little impact on the blood. So when eaten in small amounts, according to activity patterns, fruit is fine. Some sugar substitutes are good too, like Stevia and Xylitol. They taste sweet without causing a rise in blood sugar.Stealth sugars can be eaten as a treat, or if you’re trained yourself into the ground, doing exercise two or three times a day.Sugar also becomes essential for longer events, especially things like triathlon. Of course you can burn fat too but high intensity, long duration activity needs to be fuelled properly with sugars during the event.Water boy: keep hydrated, and consider taking a sports drinkRW: What does this mean for rugby players?ML: Most rugby players are pretty clued up about their diets these days. They need certain sugars to replenish those they’ve lost after playing and training. In fact, some are so cautious about what they eat that they could take on a bit more sugar post-exercise to aid their recovery.They need to eat mixed sources of slow-release carbs after exercise, like brown rice, sweet potatoes, wholewheat pasta and root vegetables.Before you exercise, a bowl of porridge is good with some yoghurt and berries, and a tiny spoonful of honey. I’d like to encourage people to think of sugar as fuel. It’s like the petrol you put in your tank.Sugar during exercise can be good as well. If you’re training hard, it’ll help increase the time to exhaustion – in other words, make you able to train harder for longer. Exercise does change the rules, but remember that if you’re training for an hour or less it really isn’t necessary to take on any sugars or gels during that time.RW: What will happen to your performance if you eat too much sugar?ML: You’ll probably get fat, and it’ll be like you’re carrying a dead weight around the pitch with you!RW: What should be done to help people cut down on sugar? Sugar hit: are you addicted to sweet stuff? It could affect your performance on the pitch if you areBy Bea Asprey, Rugby World Staff Writer SUGAR HAS been in the headlines a lot recently. Is it the new tobacco? Should we eat it at all? And what does all this mean for rugby players? We asked elite sports nutritionist Matt Lovell, who works with the RFU as well as Tottenham and Manchester City, for some advice.RW: Why is too much sugar so bad for us?ML: I believe that the obesity epidemic is largely down to the amount of sugar we have in our diets. There’s obviously an activity component to it as well but if you look at the stats, over the last 25 years we’ve eaten more slightly more sugar, fructose and less fat, and consistently got fatter and fatter. Diabetes has also risen as well because people don’t eat enough vegetables and don’t eat the right kinds of fats.The good life: most people don’t eat enough fruit and vegRW: What’s the science behind all this?ML: Sugar is a collective name for a group of carbohydrate compounds. If you break down a green bean enough, you’d get glucose, but in a sports drink there may be 50g of refined glucose. You never find this naturally.The primary reason sugar is so bad is because it drives our insulin levels up, and fat doesn’t. Insulin is a hormone that increases the amount of fat we store, and makes it more difficult to break it down when levels remain high.RW: Which foods contain a lot of sugar?ML: All processed foods are laden with sugar. And by that I mean pretty much anything in a box. Breakfast cereals, ready meals, frozen food, stir-in sauces, fruit yoghurts, smoothies, pizzas and of course biscuits, cakes and confectionary.What about low-fat foods, I hear you ask? Well, they’re also bad because they’re almost always high in sugar. Just look at the ingredients when you next wander round the supermarket. The only low fat food I’d recommend you eat is low-fat pesto, and low-fat mayonnaise.RW: What, there’s sugar in pizza?ML: Yep, we get it through refined wheat. We’ve been using this more and more since the industrial revolution, because we want to store foods and make them last longer. We’ve ended up with high levels of sugar, fat and salt in our food. It’s an addictive combination, and then you add preservatives, additives and MSG and it makes it even more addictive. It’s a real nightmare!RW: Are there other foods that contain more sugar than we might realise?ML: Yes, we call them stealth sugars. Things like fruit smoothies have loads of sugar in them, and if you drink more than two and a half cans of fizzy pop a day, it can increase your liver fat, which is not good.RW: Why have these things crept into our diet?ML: We shop on price, and eat foods that are easy to prepare. In addition, the nation is obsessed with cereal, and most people eat white bread over wholemeal, which is terrible for you. In fact many people do better off wheat than on it. ML: Given the rise in the obesity epidemic, the government does have a responsibility to do something. The message consumers are getting through advertising and marketing is wrong.Something everyone can do, though, is to make more food from scratch. People find it time consuming chopping up their own fresh vegetables, but you can drop 2% of your body fat by cutting out things like sauces from jars. Try it!last_img read more

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Why are Scotland wearing white against France in the Six Nations?

first_imgOrange is the new blue: Scotland’s ‘change’ shirt in 1999At Test level, teams most often revert to the tradition of home sides wearing a ‘change’ of kit. Although for commercial reasons, many Test sides may relish the opportunity to sport another kit in front of their adoring home fans, in hope that some may wish to purchase a replica shirt in an atypical shade.Scotland are of course no strangers to performing in surprisingly-coloured alternative kit. In recent years they have worn a shirt with a saltire on the stomach, and who can forget Scotland’s garish, orange alternative shirt circa 1999 (shown above)? Why are Scotland wearing white against France in the Six Nations?Although they traditionally wear blue, and despite them being the home side, Scotland are wearing white for their clash with France in the 2018 Six Nations. As France – known as Les Bleus –  also wear blue, Scotland have taken the move to wear white to avoid a colour clash. But if they are playing at home, BT Murrayfield in Edinburgh, why are they the ones expected to wear a ‘change’ jersey?Well, it is a long-standing tradition in rugby for the ‘home’ side to wear an alternative kit, should the issue of colour clash arise. This harks back to the days when the home side were more likely to have a change of shirt to hand. This is largely upheld in the amateur game, where the home side donning a change of kit is consider more in-keeping with the spirit of the game. White stuff: Stuart Hogg and Tommy Seymour in white shirts LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSHowever, in the professional club game, it is not uncommon to see the away side sporting alternative uniforms, much like teams in soccer do. For example, this season, when Exeter Chiefs visited Newcastle and when Saracens visited Wasps, the away sides in both Aviva Premiership clashes wore their alternative, white jerseys. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

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Six Nations Analysis: First-phase attack

first_imgNatural. Born. TryscorerWelcome back @anthonywatson_!#ENGvWAL #GuinnessSixNations pic.twitter.com/v9wybmftqx— Guinness Six Nations (@SixNationsRugby) March 7, 2020Lineouts are harder to attack from because you can really only attack one way – away from the lineout. The defenders therefore set up to push the attackers wide, which can cause some problems. Six Nations Analysis: Finishing Expand Length of the field: Justin Tipuric finishes off a try that started from receiving the kick-off (Getty Images) Collapse Six Nations Analysis: Finishing Six Nations Analysis: First-phase attackWe tend to remember those long defensive stands where teams hold out against phase upon phase of relentless attack. You only need to look back a year to Wales v England in the Six Nations when Cory Hill scored after 30-plus phases. Those tries may live long in the memory but they are a rarity. It is far more common for tries to come off first phase.Before we go any further, it’s time we clarify what is meant by a phase. Every time an attacker is tackled the phase count goes up by one. That count rises until they score or the ball is handed to the opposition at which point their phase counter starts.When we say first phase, we mean the first time the attack have an opportunity to attack with the ball. Typically this is from a lineout or a scrum, but could also be from a kick-off or turnover.Dan Biggar scored off first phase for Wales’ second try against England… Six Nations Analysis: The Last Pass Six Nations Analysis: Targeting Individual Defenders England set-up a fake maul, which draws the Welsh forwards to one place. Tom Curry is playing the part of the scrum-half, which allows Ben Youngs to move into the fly-half position. This set-up is increasingly common because it allows your fly-half to stand in the middle of the pitch and provide an immediate wide threat.Wales identify this and their backs look to close down the Ford threat in the midfield. Curry follows his own pass, which drags the players marking him over. That expands the hole in the Welsh defence and Youngs pulls the pass back towards Anthony Watson, who finishes with some exceptional footwork.Rather than put pressure on the wide channel, England threatened wide and opened up the defence close to the lineout. It was classic misdirection: show one threat and then attack a weakness the defence didn’t know they had.We have talked about set-piece first phase tries up to this point but the best try of the weekend, and arguably of any Six Nations, came from a kick-off. Six Nations Analysis: The Last Pass The opening round of the Six Nations showed…center_img Sam Larner uses examples from the latest round… Six Nations Analysis: Targeting Individual Defenders The April issue of Rugby World magazine – focusing on a new generation of Six Nations stars – is out now.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. At this point England were down to 13 men due to the Manu Tuilagi red card and Ellis Genge’s yellow. This causes clear problems for them because they cannot cover all the Welsh attacking options.They could have matched the back-line by reducing the numbers in their scrum to six but then they may just be pushed over the line by Wales. Instead they go for seven in the scrum and six defending the backs.It is interesting to see George Ford’s role. He is defending the blindside but he is going to dart to the openside as soon as it is clear that Wales won’t attack the blindside. He moves across nicely but Wales move the ball quicker and the defence cannot react.Henry Slade finds himself caught between stopping Nick Tompkins and drifting onto Biggar. England run out of numbers and Biggar rides the Slade tackle to the line.MORE SIX NATIONS ANALYSIS Wales’ numerical superiority allowed them to overload the defenders with options. The two cards made this a unique situation but attacking teams will always try to do it from first phase of a set-piece. They can run a practised move that is designed to exert pressure on a certain part of the defence. That isn’t the case in open play.England were able to score a first-phase try of their own earlier in the match for the opening try… In the second feature in this new series,… One of the greatest tries the #GuinnessSixNations has EVER seen#ENGvWAL pic.twitter.com/QskEGowmaw— Guinness Six Nations (@SixNationsRugby) March 7, 2020Kick-offs are generally not returned for tries. The reason for this is that the kicking team know where the ball is going and can chase to pin the receivers in that spot.In this example, England tried to do just that. Elliot Daly charges after the kick with George Kruis and Mark Wilson either side of him. When Tompkins receives the ball he has Daly bearing down on him.With someone moving that quickly, it is easy to step them and when Tompkins does that he just needs to get past Kruis before Wales can create a line break.Tompkins cuts infield to create a wider running lane for Josh Navidi on the outside. Navidi then cuts infield again to fix two defenders and give the ball back to Tompkins. From there it’s just a succession of two-on-ones that puts Justin Tipuric under the posts.England played a high-risk hand. If Daly had caught Tompkins with the ball then Wales would have been in their own 22 and possibly looking at a turnover. When Tompkins avoids the tackle the English defence is just a succession of individuals that Wales can slice through.Full stretch: Anthony Watson scores England’s first try from a lineout move (Getty Images)ConclusionFirst phase provides a great attacking opportunity. From set-piece, you get to place your attackers however you wish. This allows you to put pressure on defences who have to react to your training-ground move. It is no wonder that set-pieces provide such fertile attacking ground.From kick-offs or turnovers the attack may not know where the ball is going to go but the defence are suddenly thrown into a situation they didn’t expect. The Tipuric try is a perfect example: England expected to pin Wales in their own 22 but suddenly they were facing a rampaging Wales.Watch out for how Wales and Scotland deal with both attacking and defending off first phase in their final match of the Six Nations on Saturday. In the latest in his series, Sam Larner looks at how England and Wales scored tries from first phase at the weekend LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Expandlast_img read more

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The challenges of rugby’s return to training explained

first_imgProfessional sport returns in phase 2 of Scotland’s Covid-19 route map. Conditional on public health advice so contact sport unlikely to be at the front of the queue. pic.twitter.com/mXHcszHxRC— Cammy Black – Scottish Rugby Podcast (@CammyBlack) May 21, 2020“It’s doing that week after week and preparing properly for every game. And so you need to be very tolerant for training, because anyone can get through that one week, you can get through it and get through an 80-minute game and you can do that once. But to do that six weeks on the bounce you have to have a load of resilience, which is what top players do.“But as rugby has evolved and science has taken over and the understanding of human performance has improved, a big component of fitness now is training tolerance and building a sort of a chronic training load into the guys. When you do that, that’s the bit that gets fewer injuries.”Another byproduct of a truncated pre-season, if we endeavour to complete this season, is that we may see coaches’ schemes get stripped back. The clock is definitely ticking for any S&C department – and regardless of Bronco scores, rugby is a multi-faceted sport.For those who under-performed before Covid-19 hit, concluding the season after this break may represent a clean slate. But regardless, hard work will lie ahead. Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. The challenges of rugby’s return to training explainedWhile those in the UK and Ireland wait for clarity on when players should return to training at their club, in Italy one side is back at it.“Our Covid-19 crisis board, composed of our club’s and other external doctors, arranged a full and detailed protocol in order to respect the national and regional laws over this Phase Two in Italy and sport’s return to action at an individual stage,” explains a representative from Zebre.“Before starting any kind of activity, a serological test was done to understand if someone had the Covid-19 antibodies. In case someone was found positive, the club would start deeper analysis. As no one was found positive, (on Wednesday) every player got back to action on the pitch for his individual return to fitness – but not to rugby.“We’re waiting, as soccer is, for a full protocol for the return to contact training in the coming days/weeks and also for the Italian Rugby Union’s return to rugby guidelines.”Related: World Rugby’s Covid-19 return to play guidelinesIn Australia and New Zealand, they too are back into the grind. With fitness testing being conducted, it made global news that All Blacks star Beauden Barrett was busting records at the Bronco test. Yet elsewhere in Europe, there is rising consternation over rumoured schedules – with everyone waiting for a decree from governing bodies. We all need to know if the season can be completed at all. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Addressing this, Mellalieu says that players will recognise the financial imperative to get rugby back up and running. But it will be a strange experience at first. And tough.Related: Remembering the day Jackass joined London Irish trainingHe asks: “Is it realistic to be able to expect players to peak within a four- to five-week reconditioning phase? It’s very difficult to do, and then you’ve got a lot of contextual factors.“So if you’ve been a professional for ten years, you’ll have had nine or ten pre-seasons, you know how to handle your body, you’re probably very experienced at coming back into rugby and delivering very quickly, very successfully.“With your less experienced player, the rookie who has just come out of the academy, you’re finding your way in the group and it may take a lot longer to hit your straps. So there’s this desire to get everyone together and get games played but then I think there will be real challenges around actually getting good performances out of teams.“Because it’s one thing wanting to get people fit to be able to play, but actually then to perform is a real challenge. Obviously that’s where the pressure will come on the coaching staff, within that condensed time, to be able to deliver a programme that not only shows players are medically fit to play but also perform to their best.”Wood work: Tom Wood at home (Getty Images)Which is one side, but just as Gill said there will be an element of needing to hold some players back, Mellalieu knows there will be players who are straining to get back to some semblance of ‘normality’ or at least have some hard work to look forward to. And there’s another element.He clarifies: “I’ve been involved in some research work with the PRL and the RPA and the RFU around the psychological load of the season. And towards February, March the grind kicks in and we get an increased perception of load and symptoms we’ll see of a kind of burnout and overtraining and things like that. Mentally the boys feel tired.“We’ve almost chopped that bit off. Just as we were getting to the grind point, post-Christmas and Europe, everyone suddenly called off the day-to-day of having to go into the training ground. They’ve been told to train at home.“So as much as there are anxieties about when will we start back, the financial, the contractual, there probably has been a little bit of a recovery, regeneration for the players. Now, it’s not fully been time away from the game where you’ve been able to go and spend two weeks and lay on the beach and forget about the sport. Because everyone’s been in a training limbo. You’ve been expected to train just in case you come back early.“There’s not full recovery, like a proper off-season. But I definitely think a lot of the boys have just said, ‘I’ve got time in my family that I wouldn’t have had before. I’m loving seeing the kids, spending time with them, getting stuff done in the garden or all those jobs you have to cram into typical off-season.’ So I think there are a lot of positives in that sense.”As teams first come back in and maintain distancing measures, Mellalieu hopes innovations come to the fore. Digital interaction with online demonstrations could come in handy, as will visualisation and plenty of team discussion as contact comes back in and teams have to work on cohesion in a short space of time.PRE-ORDER RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE’S 60TH ANNIVERSARY ISSUE (JUL-20) HEREUp in Edinburgh, head of S&C Nick Lumley has looked to other sports like weightlifting and boxing, where prolonged time off between intense competition phases is more of the norm. But preparing an ambitious group of players to re-enter a season after enforced time on the sidelines is such a new challenge. Exciting, sure, but it is still terrain with no footprints on it.Lumley explains: “The challenge is the end point is the same as ever (putting players into competition in optimum shape), but what we don’t know is the starting point, because we don’t know the effect this time off has had on them.“They’ll have maintained (some) level of health and fitness, but we don’t really know fully how they’re going to come back. And so some guys naturally will do lots of training because they enjoy it and it’s good for their head and it’s good for their bodies, and it’s what they enjoy doing.“Some of them will have done loads of running, for instance, some of them have their own gyms so will have done loads and loads of weights. Some guys will have been doing circuits in the front room with a couple of dumb-bells because that’s what they’ve got. But from all these different starting points we’ve got to get them all to the same finishing point.Isolation station: Jack Nowell at home (Getty Images)“A big thing over the course of preseason, S&C wise, is that we need to build training load. Guys who do longer pre-seasons have fewer injuries. That doesn’t mean that if you have a long pre-season you won’t get injured, it just means you’re less likely to. That’s a very consistent trend that we’ve observed. This will be my fourth pre-season at Edinburgh and every single year we observe that the guys that get through pre-season, have fewer injuries in the season.“We’ve got very good rugby coaches who prepare the team very well, we’re well drilled and well organised and they do a really good job. They bring all the components together on the field on a Friday night, but as part of that is the training week that goes into that. We work hard during the week.“So it’s not just preparing guys to get through 80 minutes – it’s preparing guys to get to 80 minutes, have a day off and then train again on Monday or on Sunday. Two days later you’re back on the training field, repairing and reviewing and preparing for the next game, and then going again the day after. If you’re a forward it works out as 15 to 18km (run) a week, plus a lot of contacts and collissions. In the backs that’s in the early 20s. RETURNING TO PLAY AFTER PROLONGED TRAINING RESTRICTIONS IN COLLISION SPORTS accepted Int J Sports [email protected] @EliteSC7 @close_nutrition @Nicgill4 @Breathe_to_win @Andy_Kasper @drsimonkemp @SteveMellalieu Nick Pierce @fizziobob @BenjaminTWall @westy160991 @mattjcrossie pic.twitter.com/BQvTueLUph— Prof Ben Jones (@23Benjones) May 14, 2020Among those names on the paper is Stephen Mellalieu, Professor in Sport Psychology and Associate Dean for Research at Cardiff Met, who also helps out the Ospreys. He has done research alongside the RFU and RPA too.“A key period of reconditioning is needed – physical, tactical, technical, and mental before the players go back to full games,” says Mellalieu of the big takeaways. “Player have been able to undertake a degree of conditioning and you will have see Barrett smashing the Bronco test. So boys have been out to train, do a lot of running work and lifting work as well. But as you know, the biggest in the gym isn’t necessarily the best rugby player and they may be physically conditioned, but they need to be contact conditioned, to be prepared to play.Related: The uncertainty facing out-of-work coaches“The only  evidence we have (from a collision sport) about breaks in seasons is the NFL lockdown back in 2011. And there was a sharp spike in injuries when the NFL boys returned to competition and to training. So contact doesn’t just allow you to make better hits, contact obviously protects you from injury. So the concern is that if players have to do an accelerated return to rugby programme, they may be at greater risk of injury when they do start playing, essentially.”When you look at the academic literature, according to Mellalieu, there is a fair amount written on the effects of isolation and confinement, from a psychological perspective. He describes this global situation as a “trauma” and points out that: “We’re all people first; athletes or workers second.” Take the rugby out, there is clearly potential for distress in relation to this trauma.Back at it: Melbourne Rebels doing conditioning this month (Getty Images)If someone is unable to do their job, he says, it potentially impacts their sense of identity, for example. There are lots of challenges with training at home too. The broad approach is assessing how to deal with players after such a seismic change. But as well as that, any return to training ahead of the season resuming will be unlike any pre-season the athletes have experienced before.For a start there is the standard anxieties of a pre-season – impressing as you head towards the last year of a contract, hitting targets, returning from injury and more – but also the added layer of unease generated by having concerns over the health implications of joining back up. After all, any player may have a pregnant partner or also care for an elderly relative. Then there is the ticking clock, should we set a date for competition resuming. Prem Rugby’s return becoming more & more messy. Some clubs say 4 weeks needed to prep; others 8. Social distancing will only work in phase one of training at best. Mass testing required but costly. Plus players still on furlough and rules unclear. Early July games now v unlikely— Chris Jones BBC (@chjones9) May 21, 2020The Professional Game Board in England has stated more time is needed “to ensure that players, staff and officials can return to a safe training environment, and that is not expected to be in place for a minimum of two weeks”. So training in small groups is not likely to resume until June at the earliest.A report in the Telegraph describes the completion of a full English Premiership’s season as a ‘long shot’, while there are differing theories around the length of time clubs would be allowed to train together before full action does resume.But how difficult is it to get back into the swing of things anyway?“I would not say there is consensus on exactly what needs to happen following the lockdowns that have occurred in most countries,” explains All Blacks strength and conditioning coach Nic Gill of best practice for returning to training.“However, there is consensus that we must progress things based on a return to play window and what players have been able to do while at home and what sort of condition they come back in… A little bit of reverse engineering is likely to be required.“Here in New Zealand we have come out of lockdown and will look to play in three-and-a-half weeks. Our isolation has been about seven weeks but all players stayed on programmes with the anticipation we would be playing again.Solo sesh: All Black Beauden Barrett training alone during lockdown (Getty Images)“It is reasonably difficult to get back into things from a structure and progression perspective, but also with ‘rules’ to return to play around hygiene, cleanliness, contact tracing and the fact that many teams have probably lost staff or resources due to the pandemic. However, there is huge excitement to get back playing rugby so probably a little bit of pulling back will be required by staff as players’ energy and enthusiasm is peaking!”Related: Anatomy of a rugby transfer during Covid-19 crisisGill, alongside many others from the academic arm of the game, also contributed to a paper entitled Returning to play after prolonged training restrictions in collision sports that landed this month. When clubs get back to training, they have to work hard on conditioning, cohesion and dealing from rugby’s grind again Toally different: Harlequins during a traditional pre-season session (Getty Images) last_img read more

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Best Rugby Shirts For Kids 2021

first_imgCan’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Please follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Best Rugby Shirts For KidsWhen you’re a kid, your favourite sports stars are your heroes, and so it should come as no surprise that many young fans want to emulate their favourite players by donning the same jerseys as them. The good news is that for decades now teams have realised that the kids jersey market is huge, and as such there are loads of options for you to choose from no matter what team you support. By and large these shirts are the same as the ‘pro’ style adult jerseys, which means they’re not exactly the same as the ones the players wear, but they’re pretty damn close, and will certainly do the job for kids to wear while they’re playing or wearing casually. Below are our pick of the best options for kids’ rugby shirts in 2020 – and we also have a guide on the best rugby boots for kids. Best Rugby Shirts For KidsUmbro England Rugby 2020/21 Home Replica JuniorImage: Umbro+ Looks very similar to version worn by the pros+ Looser fit for comfort+ Multi-layered tonal pattern adds depth to classic England lookAfter seven years with rugby mainstay Canterbury, England jumped ship to British kit supplier Umbro – just in time for the Autumn Nations Cup. Umbro might be more famous for their soccer pedigree, but the brand has a long history with rugby, having supplied various test teams in the 70s and 80s, including the British & Irish Lions.Their first England shirt is as clean and classic as you’d expect, and this shirt is a close cousin of what Owen Farrell and co will be wearing this Autumn, right down to the multi-layered tonal pattern of the body fabric. Buy now from Lovell Rugby for £50But now from England Rugby Store for £40Macron Wales 2020/21 Home Replica JuniorImage: Lovell Rugby+ Dragon motif and hexagonal pattern just like pro shirt+ WRU ‘shield’ badge just like test jerseys+ Relaxed fit compared to test designAnother brand with a new kit supplier for 2020/21, Wales ended their 12-year association with Under Armour over the summer, and have switched to Italian brand Macron in a seven-year deal. The new shirt drew comparisons with Liverpool’s current home shirt, but that hasn’t stopped fans proclaiming it one of the nicest Wales shirts in years.Buy now from JD Sports for £55Buy now from Lovell Rugby for £55Macron Scotland 2020/21 Replica Alternate JuniorCredit: Lovell Rugby+ Gold touches celebrate first international match+ Tartan pattern on lower back+ Modern take on classic collarMacron and Scotland have been together since 2013, and in that time the brand has provided them with some of the most ‘classic’ looking test designs that we’ve seen in many a year. The 2020/21 version is no exception, and we actually think the white alternate version offers a more striking look than the traditional blue home shirt With a classic fold-over collar reinvented for the modern era and the classic blend of blue and white, it could be a shirt from a bygone age, and that’s with good reason – the flashes of gold on sleeves and collar placket are there to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the first ever international rugby match, which was held between England and Scotland in 1871.Buy now from Lovell Rugby for £55Buy now from Sports Direct for £54.99Adidas New Zealand All Blacks 2019/20 Home Jersey JuniorCredit: Adidas+ Reduced seams for extra comfort+ Low profile crew neck fit for all shapes and sizes + Classic black jersey with white collarThe All Blacks jersey is timeless and classic, so most of the clever stuff about the players’ jersey involves what’s going on under the hood – innovations such as ‘seamless technology’ designed to maximise comfort, a raw elastic low-profile collar and ‘triaxle’ fabric for enhanced strength. This kids jersey doesn’t have all that, but with the cool triaxle effect grip pattern across the front of the design, they’ll surely look the part on the field or at home. Buy now from Lovell Rugby for £37Buy now from Adidas for £45 The best rugby shirt for kids to wear when they cheer on their heroes Canterbury British & Irish Lions 2021 Pro Shirt JuniorCredit: Canterbury+ Striking ‘shard lion’ graphic on shoulders+ Replica of Lions test jersey+ Made of 100% recycled polyesterThe Lions tour is the pinnacle of home nations rugby and one of the most unique and special moments in the rugby calendar, so you can be sure kids will be desperate to cheer on the team in South Africa next summer, and they can do so in a pretty spot-on replica of the test jersey courtesy of Canterbury. The shirt features a variety of interesting features including a ‘shard lion’ graphic on both shoulders, ‘SA 2020’ embroidered logo, unique low-profile collar design and from an environmental perspective, it’s also made of 100% recycled polyester, which is a nice touch. Buy now from England Rugby Store for £44Buy now from Lovell Rugby for £50Canterbury Ireland 2020/21 Alt Pro Jersey JuniorCredit: Canterbury+ 3D Injection Moulded IRFU crest+ Vapodri fabric offers excellent moisture wicking+ Stretch collar for improved comfortIreland recently signed a new long-term deal with Canterbury, who they have been with since 2016, and marked the occasion by revealing the brand new jerseys that the men in green will wear this season. The shirt features a striking black and ‘bio lime’ pattern across the body, which apparently “demands attention, embodying youth, vibrancy and energy”… and it certainly feels like a jersey that will be a hit with kids. But now from Canterbury for £50Macron Italy 2020/21 Home Shirt JuniorCredit: Sports Direct+ Tonal pinstriped pattern+ Unique collar design+ Subtle Italian flag motifs throughoutThe Azzuri continually sport some of the best looking jerseys in all of rugby and their 2020/21 jersey is no exception, with the classic light blue jersey accented with white and subtle Italian flag touches on the back of the jersey and on the collar. The shirt also features a striking and unique collar design, and a rather lovely subtle double-pinstriped pattern that runs through the front and back of the design. Buy now from Lovell Rugby for £55Buy now from Sports Direct for £54.99Canterbury Ospreys Alternate Pro Shirt 20/21 JuniorImage: Canterbury+ Striking white, mint and pink colour scheme+ Eye-catching ‘Swansea area’ pattern+ Vapodri moisture-wicking fabricThe Ospreys are Wales’ most successful pro team, and one of the most successful teams in the Guinness Pro14, but the Swansea-based region are also famous for consistently having some of the most bold and eye-catching shirts in the world, and 2020 is no exception. Away shirts are often a bit bright and different and designed to appeal to kids, and this one with its, pink, green and white pattern designed to represent the topography around the Liberty Stadium, is certainly no shrinking violet. Buy now from Canterbury for £48Buy now from Lovell Rugby for £47.99 LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

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Episcopal Church website honored with ‘WebAward’

first_img Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit a Press Release In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Washington, DC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Albany, NY [Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs] The website of the Episcopal Church – www.episcopalchurch.org – has been honored with a 2012 WebAward for Outstanding Achievement in Web Development in the Faith-based Category by the Web Marketing Association.“This is a welcome validation of our small team’s work,” noted Anne Rudig, director of communication. “Creating a meaningful experience for both new and frequent visitors to the site was the goal. I think this award recognizes achievement of that goal.”The website was evaluated against seven criteria: design, innovation, content, technology, interactivity, copywriting, and ease of use. In particular, the award noted: “Videos throughout the site provide an excellent user interactivity opportunity.”Working with Duo Consulting and Atmosphere Design of Kansas City, Missouri, the Office of Communication launched the new website on Tuesday, December 27, 2011, utilizing Drupal open-source technologies.“The launching of the website this past December was the result a more than a year of careful, thoughtful and, at times ‘different’ thinking, about how the Church should be represented on the web,” noted Barry Merer, Episcopal Church manager of web and social media services. “The church itself, its beliefs, and the ministry and work it does are the stars of this project.”About the WebAwardsSince 1997, the Web Marketing Association’s annual WebAward Competition has been setting the standard of excellence for Website development. Independent expert judges from around the world review sites in 96 industries. The best are recognized with a WebAward which helps interactive professionals promote themselves, their companies, and their best work to the outside world. The WebAward Competition is the premier award recognition program for Web developers and marketers worldwide. Rector Collierville, TN An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Knoxville, TN Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Bath, NC Rector Martinsville, VA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Press Release Servicecenter_img Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Featured Events Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Cathedral Dean Boise, ID New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Pittsburgh, PA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Smithfield, NC Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Belleville, IL Featured Jobs & Calls Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Church website honored with ‘WebAward’ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Posted Sep 17, 2012 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, ILlast_img read more

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Video: The Rev. Tom Slawson reflects on the Way of…

first_img Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Hopkinsville, KY Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Tags Submit a Job Listing New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Gun Violence, Rector Martinsville, VA Submit an Event Listing Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Mar 26, 2013 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Collierville, TN An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Featured Events Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Youth Minister Lorton, VA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem [Episcopal News Service – Washington, D.C.] The Rev. Tom Slawson, vicar of St. Peter’s Episcopal Church in Ellicott City, Maryland, reflects on his participation in the March 25 Way of the Cross procession in a cold and rainy Washington, D.C. Video: The Rev. Tom Slawson reflects on the Way of the Cross The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Rector Columbus, GA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Director of Music Morristown, NJ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Washington, DC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Video Curate Diocese of Nebraska DC Stations, Rector Pittsburgh, PA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit a Press Release Rector Bath, NC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Tampa, FL Press Release Service Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Belleville, IL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Advocacy Peace & Justice, Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Albany, NY Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL last_img read more

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Connecticut priest recovers after life-saving kidney donation

first_img The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Press Release Rector Knoxville, TN Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 March 12, 2014 at 7:27 am Greg is a wonderful human being whose example of ‘giving’ has taken on new meaning. As one who too has faced kidney disease, Greg has given confidence to us all that, ‘seek and ye shall find, knock, and the door shall be open’. And that, all things come of thee, and of thine own have we given thee’. Thank you Greg, and may God bless, and heal those who recover .Blessings, Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY The Rev. Dr. Harold Lockett + says: Press Release Service In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Featured Events Rector Tampa, FL Rector Smithfield, NC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Connecticut priest recovers after life-saving kidney donation Director of Music Morristown, NJ An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Health & Healthcare Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL March 12, 2014 at 6:10 pm I am in awe of such a generous gift. What an example of giving for all of us! Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Tags Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Jane Davis says: center_img By Karin HamiltonPosted Mar 11, 2014 The Rev Mark K J Robinson says: Submit an Event Listing Submit a Job Listing TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Collierville, TN Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis March 13, 2014 at 11:38 am What Greg did was a wonderful example of The Gift Exchange, whereby the giver gives a gift out of love to a recipient whose distress is relieved as a result of the gift. Moreover, the exchange of his gift creates an inseparable bond between he and his recipient. What a wonderful act of love on behalf of Greg. May God bless him with ‘a greater love’ oneday. Amen. Kim Polhemus and the Rev. Greg Welin.[Episcopal Diocese of Connecticut] The Rev. Greg Welin is home and resting comfortably these days. Admittedly this wouldn’t be newsworthy except for the fact that he donated a kidney last month.A fatal genetic disorderHere’s the backstory: In 2010, Greg was serving as the priest-in-charge of St. John’s in New Milford. There, he met and worked with Kim Polhemus who was serving as senior warden at that time. While outwardly healthy, internally Kim was battling a genetic disease known as Polycystic Kidney Disease, or PKD. The disease is eventually fatal without dialysis or a kidney transplant. Kim has shared that PKD is rampant in her family. Other family members, including her father, have died from it — sometimes after languishing on dialysis for a few years before succumbing.Kim had PKD, as did one of her sisters, Kathy. A third sister, Michelle, did not inherit it.Back in 2010, tests coming back from the doctors at Yale-New Haven Hospital showed the kidney function in both women was diminishing to the point that the sisters would either need a transplant, or dialysis, within a year. After watching what had happened to their father, Kim said that finding donors for both herself and Kathy was paramount. Sister Michelle volunteered to be a donor; she was tested and found to be a good match for either sister. The hospital wanted Michelle to declare which sister she would donate to, but with both in need of a kidney, Michelle refused to commit to either until a second donor was found.Swallowing her pride, Kim wrote a letter that summer and sent it by e-mail to everyone in her contact list, hoping and praying it would help them find a second donor. Someone forwarded it to the local newspaper and a reporter interviewed her, generating more attention and broadcasting the need to an even wider audience. According to the National Kidney Foundation, 3,381 people died in the U.S. last year, waiting for a kidney donor.Just before Thanksgiving, as Kim was on the way back from a long weekend away, her sister Kathy called her with the name of a possible donor who had quietly stepped forward and been tested.It was Greg.He’d heard about it after he returned from his summer vacation, put his name on the list, and was called in that fall for tests. Greg had had a thorough medical workup to check whether he was a match and to make sure he was healthy enough for surgery, and the answer to both was “yes.” Kim had Kathy repeat the name twice before she realized who it was. Both were overwhelmed with gratitude.“When I received the call from the hospital I started crying with joy and kept saying ‘thank you’ over and over,” Kathy said. “I asked them to tell Greg thank you so much.” It brought tears to Kim as well. “I cried in the car. I never saw his name on the list, he never told me,” she said.While Greg’s decision to offer his kidney was certainly a gift and blessing to Kim’s family, it was also a blessing to Greg for a different reason. Years ago his sister had died and he hadn’t been able to do anything to help: this time, it would be different. He could help.Back at St. John’s, Greg had a practice of inviting people to stand up, after the congregation exchanges the peace during the Sunday service, and share something for which they’d like to give thanks. Kim and Greg stood up together and shared all the news with the congregation.The surgeries beginWith a second donor now in place, doctors determined that Michelle’s kidney was a better match for Kim, so Greg would be donating a kidney to Kathy.The next summer, as Kim’s kidney continued to fail, she had what the doctors at Yale-New Haven hospital called a “textbook transplant.” There was no infection or rejection, and Michelle was up and active again in a week.Unexpectedly, Kathy’s kidney function stabilized for a while. Greg, Kim, and Kathy stayed in touch by e-mail occasionally, as they waited. It wasn’t until the fall of 2013 that the doctors decided that it was time. Greg, who by then was the priest-in-charge of St. Paul’s, Woodbury, said that the end of the Epiphany season would be the best time for him. They all agreed on an early February date.Because the original testing had been in 2010, Greg was thoroughly re-tested, passing them all.Both donor, and recipient, along with Kim, Michelle, Kathy’s husband George, and Greg’s wife Amy, arrived about 6:30 a.m. at Yale-New Haven hospital on Feb. 6.Greg was quickly admitted and got to say “hi” to Kathy as she waited.Kathy needed some additional tests when she arrived so her surgery was delayed three hours. Surgery itself was three to four hours for each. Afterwards, each went to post-op care in Yale-New Haven’s Transplantation Center.Greg stayed for two days, going home Feb. 8. While he was in the hospital he saw Kathy a few times, to say hello. Kathy’s recovery was longer as her body has to accept the donated kidney.Kathy stayed until Feb. 11. Kim said that Kathy was home for a week but then was readmitted with a lot of pain. After two days she was released home again. “My sister is now on her way to a normal life with her new healthy kidney,” said Kim.Greg’s recovery was more straightforward. “I moved around a bit gingerly at first,” he said, “and had some trouble bending to get in and out of chairs and the bed.” But other than the tiredness and modest post-surgery pain, he said that he didn’t feel any differently.“I was relieved,” he said. “There were lots of unknowns: What would I feel like? What was the surgical process? How incapacitated would I be? I was relieved that it wasn’t as difficult as I was concerned it might have been. I always felt I was in good hands, though, and very supported. I didn’t feel alone.”Concerns about how the parish would do in his absence were relieved, also, as people were eager to help out. “They’ve been supporting me in a positive way,” he said.Amy, Greg’s wife, who is also the priest-in-charge of St. John’s in Waterbury, said she’s also relieved the surgery went so well and is now behind them. She supported his decision, yet it’s still major surgery so normal fears rose up along with those that she carried from having been widowed earlier in her life. “I’m very proud of Greg for being compassionate and generous,” she said. “And I knew the surgeon was good, but I was terrified. The night before the surgery I had to get out of bed for a while and have a cry.”God must have been listening. An Episcopal chaplain walked in on them when Greg was in pre-op – actually, it was a priest whom Amy had mentored – and offered prayers. Then next day when Greg was in post-op, two other chaplains, both Episcopal clergy whom she knew, stopped by.Greg continues to do well, in all ways. “I’m really happy I was able to do this,” he said. “In the back of my mind I was thinking of my sister, who died. I couldn’t do anything at that time. When the opportunity came up here, I thought I could help a fellow sister on the planet. It’s a great privilege to be able to help in this very tangible way.”“And,” he said, “how often do we get a chance to do something like this?”Kim also reflects on the journey. “It’s been a big circle,” she said. “It changes you on so many levels. First, my own survival, then my sister’s. I have an overwhelming sense of gratitude through all this, for his humbleness and generosity and life-giving spirit.“It’s hard to know how to thank someone sufficiently for saving your sister’s life.” Comments (3) Rector Washington, DC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Belleville, IL Rector Bath, NC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Albany, NY Comments are closed.last_img read more

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First female diocesan bishop in Church of England consecrated

first_img Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Comments are closed. Youth Minister Lorton, VA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group August 20, 2015 at 3:49 pm When will the Church of England change its name to “Church of Do Whatever Feels Good” and just get it over with? As Robin Williams indicated, being an Anglican (Episcopalian) is pageantry without the guilt. Rector Hopkinsville, KY Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Press Release Service Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Events Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York John Paul Parks says: Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Posted Jul 24, 2015 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Anglican Communion Curate Diocese of Nebraska Tags Rector Martinsville, VA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Albany, NY Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group First female diocesan bishop in Church of England consecrated Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Rector Columbus, GA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Bishops Rachel Treweek (left) and Sarah Mullally (right) with Archbishop Justin Welby outside Canterbury CathedralPhoto: Rob Berry/Canterbury Cathedral[Anglican Communion News Service] A wave of clapping and cheering greeted two newly consecrated bishops as they processed down a packed Canterbury Cathedral on a historic day. The Rt Revd Sarah Mullally, Bishop of Crediton, and the Rt Revd Rachel Treweek, Bishop of Gloucester, made history as the first women to be consecrated and ordained bishop in the historic heart of Anglicanism – Canterbury Cathedral.The service was celebratory from beginning to end. Opening with the rousing Wesley Hymn O for a Thousand Tongues to Sing, the service continued with readings from Song of Songs and 2 Corinthians preceding the account of the encounter between Mary Magdalene and the risen Jesus from the Gospel of John.The preacher, the Rt Revd Adrian Newman, Bishop of Stepney, reminded the congregation that the gospel depiction of Mary Magdalene was far removed from the imagination of masculine fantasy in works such as the De Vinci Code.Mary Magdalene was a significant leader in the community of Jesus, he said, and it was no accident that she was the first to speak with the risen Jesus and the first to tell the good news of his resurrection.In a sermon punctuated with pithy observation Bishop Newman called on Bishops Rachel and Sarah to make a difference in the life of the church.“I hope that women bishops will disturb us,” he said. “I hope they will challenge the conventions of the Church of England, which continues to be led and directed by too many people like me: white, male, middle-aged professionals.”Bishop Treweek is the first woman to be a Diocesan Bishop in the Church of England but she is not the first in the Anglican Communion. In Canterbury she was joined by the Rt Revd Helen-Ann Hartley, the Bishop of the Diocese of Waikato in New Zealand, and the Rt Revd Cate Waynick, the Bishop of the Diocese of Indianapolis in the USA.To add to the sense of history they processed alongside Bishop Barbara Harris, the first woman bishop in the Anglican Communion, who was consecrated in 1989.The Diocese of Gloucester has partnership links with dioceses in South India, Sweden, Tanzania and the USA. Its link Diocese of El Camino Real in California also has a woman diocesan bishop who became the first woman bishop to preside in an English Cathedral when she visited Gloucester as part of a Continuing Indaba journey in 2010. Rector Pittsburgh, PA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Comments (2) Submit a Press Release Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Knoxville, TN Submit a Job Listing Rector Shreveport, LA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Robert Horwath says: Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Belleville, IL Rector Tampa, FL August 2, 2015 at 6:09 pm What a grace! I know traditional Anglo-Catholics find this anathema…but how is female consecration of bishops invalid when in Catholic sacramental theology the sacred character of ordination is a mark on the SOUL not on the body…so go CofE…follow the Spirit of God as we have here in this Church…God has a way to climb over the walls of our bad theology…a theology even if it has been passed down to us from the Fathers (sic) and Doctors of the Church herself. Rector Bath, NC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID last_img read more

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Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society seeks partner to develop downtown…

first_img Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL September 16, 2015 at 8:12 pm Make it a refugee sanctuary while you are going through the process!! Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK [Episcopal News Service] Bishop Stacy F. Sauls, chief operating officer of The Episcopal Church, has announced a Request for Proposals for the development of land owned by the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society on behalf of The Episcopal Church in Austin, Texas, according to a Sept. 16 press release.Sauls announced that the redevelopment is Block 87: The Trinity Block, a full city block located at 7th and Trinity streets that was purchased in 2009 by the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society – the name under which The Episcopal Church is incorporated, conducts business, and carries out mission – as a potential site for the Archives of The Episcopal Church.The property, currently an income-generating parking lot, has the potential for more than 600,000 developable square feet, and is located on the border of the financial district and the Sixth Street Historic District, near St. David’s Episcopal Church, one of the oldest buildings in the city.“The Episcopal Church has been part of Texas and of Austin since its beginning,” said Sauls, in the press release. “We are particularly excited to be part of Austin’s development for the common good of this community for many reasons, including the fact that our next General Convention, our highest governing body, will meet in Austin in July 2018.  We are committed to this development being a benefit to all segments of the community and something of which Austin will be proud.”The Episcopal Church has worked with Studio8 architects on a vision for the property and is soliciting development partners to construct this or another creative design, including a space for the Archives of The Episcopal Church. Rendering: Studio8Plans call for the development of the land with a partner for office, residential, and retail uses along with a new Archives of The Episcopal Church, which are currently housed at the Seminary of the Southwest, a space the collection has long outgrown, Sauls said.Austin, the state’s capital with a population of 912,791, is the fastest growing big city in the country, home to the University of Texas Longhorns, Austin City Limits, and the popular SXSW music festival. The city’s unofficial slogan is “Keep Austin Weird”.Located 165 miles slightly northwest of Houston, Austin also is part of the Episcopal Diocese of Texas.“We are thrilled that The Episcopal Church has made plans to develop property in Austin for a permanent home for the church’s archives,” said Texas Bishop C. Andrew Doyle, in the press release. “This will insure a secure location for these historic documents in a setting that will welcome scholars to both build and access the church’s history for generations to come.”The Episcopal Church will be represented by the Rev. Canon Lang Lowrey III as asset manager, and Clinton Sayers II and Paul Byars, real estate brokers with Austin-based Sayers and Associates.“We welcome proposals from those in the development community who appreciate that the path to The Episcopal Church’s archives must come out of this transaction,” said Lowery in the press release.“This property sits at the crux of three distinct districts: Austin’s creative scene with the Red River District and East Austin, it’s burgeoning medical district to the north and the tech and hospitality anchors downtown already provides,” he added.“We believe that the Trinity Block promises the largest development opportunity in downtown. And given that there are so many different uses that could do well at this location – from the large, modern floor plan in office buildings to micro-units for residences – we are excited to work with prospective partners to develop this site.”For more information contact Bishop Stacy Sauls, [email protected] AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Episcopal Office of Public Affairs, Press Release Service This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Martinsville, VA Comments are closed. 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VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA By ENS staff Posted Sep 16, 2015 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Collierville, TN Tags Jerry Emerson says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society seeks partner to develop downtown Austin property Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET last_img read more

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