Student government passes the torch

first_imgAs students scramble to write final papers, study for exams and enjoy the last weeks of the spring semester, Notre Dame’s 2012-2013 student government is already hard at work after entering office April 1. Student body president Brett Rocheleau took the reins from his predecessor, Pat McCormick, in stepping up from his position as student body vice president following the 2011-2012 term. ND Minute talked to McCormick and Rocheleau about the accomplishments of their administration, its legacy and their hopes for the future of student government at Notre Dame. McCormick, a senior, also reflected on his time as student body president as a part of his overall Notre Dame experience. Rocheleau and student body vice president Katie Rose told us about their goals and plans for the upcoming school year, some of which build on the work he and McCormick strived for during their tenure. Rocheleau and Rose will focus on unifying the diverse Notre Dame community through a variety of means, especially at the residence hall level. They also hope to implement more practical reforms on campus, as well as continue to advocate for students.last_img read more

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Finding common ground

first_imgAs a first-year law student in 1970, Kathleen Cekanski-Farrand was one of 12 women out of 250 in her class, part of only the third coeducational graduate class in the Law School. Two years later, Cekanski-Farrand was mailing letters to welcome 119 women of the first female undergraduate class into her care in Badin Hall. In 1972, she was a third-year law student and the dorm’s first rector in beginning days of coeducation. “I thought some of the challenges that we had probably would be similar at the undergraduate level that we had at the Law School level,” Cekanski-Farrand said. “So I thought I could share some of those experiences and turn them into positives.” Cekanski-Farrand earned the job when she interviewed with then-vice president of student affairs Fr. Tom Blantz. Blantz, who stepped into that position in 1971, had been part of the administrators who determined the University would directly admit women to its undergraduate student body following failed discussions to merge Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s. “We wanted women on the campus because having an all-male school was maybe less attractive to some of the people out there who were coming from coed high schools,” Blantz said. “[Men and women] should study together so they could work together later on, and there should be places for young Catholic women to go to Catholic schools. … When the merger was called off, I think it was a logical expected step that we would admit undergraduate women ourselves. “It was pretty much around the Thanksgiving weekend [of 1971] that I got a call from the provost … that they had decided to admit about 325 women for next year, in the fall of 1972.” Approximately 125 freshmen women joined that incoming group of undergraduates, while 200 female students transferred to Notre Dame from Saint Mary’s and other schools, Blantz said. Blantz reviewed the dorms and decided to place the incoming women in Badin and Walsh Halls, and when Notre Dame admitted 500 more women the following year, he opened Breen-Phillips Hall and Farley Hall as well. “The first group of women, they had to put up with a lot,” Blantz said. “You had 300 women and 5,000 men roughly, so the odds, you are a minority. In the seminar, it’s quite probably you are the only woman in the class and that could be a little bit uncomfortable.” Some of the women were quiet in their courses at first upon entering these male-dominated classrooms, Blantz said. “I remember teaching a University seminar, a freshman seminar with 16 in the class, two women in the class and 14 fellas,” he said. “And the women rarely said anything but when they handed in their written papers, I could tell the two women were extremely bright. So it was just a question of trying to get them to open up and talk more. I think now you don’t have that problem at all.” As her residents became more comfortable with Notre Dame life, Cekanski-Farrand said she worked to build a “Badin Hall family.” “A family is what holds you together, is what keeps you together so that you feel comfortable sharing your concerns, both the good days and all the bad days too, and that they felt comfortable sharing if they had a problem in the classroom,” she said. “The more you share, the more you communicate, the better the adventure is going to be.” There were challenges to life in Badin Hall that first year, she said, from a cockroach problem to “panty raids” when male students would run through the hallways for women’s underwear. But Cekanski-Farrand worked to develop a dorm identity and support her resident by promoting a Badin Hall T-shirt and visiting classes to see for herself how her students were being treated. “We had to find some common ground,” she said. Even as that common ground became sturdier through the first months and years of coeducation, many graduates protested the initial decision to admit women to their alma mater. But Blantz said he saw this as a positive. “I remember giving a talk once [to alumni], and there was opposition to coeducation,” Blantz said. “One guy apologized, and I said, ‘No, no, I’m happy to hear this. If you guys were happy that we were going coed, then I think we wanted too long to do it. That you were happy and satisfied with your education and the way we gave it to you back then when it was an all-male school, now we simply have to demonstrate that we can do the same thing with men and women here. “‘But if you people were all happy that we were finally admitting women and changing, then we would have to think, boy, we should have done it 20 years ago and they weren’t happy here.’” Blantz returned to teaching in the fall of 1973 after two years in student affairs, and Cekanski-Farrand served as a rector in Breen-Phillips Hall before leaving Notre Dame and eventually beginning the first all-female law firm in Indiana. But she said Blantz and University President Emeritus Fr. Theodore Hesburgh remained by her side through those years as a rector and remain close friends today. Hesburgh himself only visited the dorm on a handful of occasions, Cekanski-Farrand said, but he did gift the women the first Badin Hall mascot – a small Snoopy statue that would represent the dorm for years. He judged a door-decorating competition at Christmastime, and Cekanski-Farrand said Hesburgh would often call her to make sure everything in the women’s hall was running smoothly. He shared her commitment, she said, to integrating women into the student body and bringing Notre Dame to the place it is today. “[Hesburgh] took the time to do that,” she said. “I couldn’t have asked for a more gracious individual who was wanting to make this a positive for the University. “Whatever it took to make it work, extra hours, we would do it.”last_img read more

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Notre Dame expands Asian studies courses

first_imgThe creation of a 2014 summer studies program in India and the on-campus Asian Studies Seminar on China this semester will provide Notre Dame students with the opportunity to further investigate their interest in Asia.According to Inez Suhardjo, director of undergraduate studies at the Liu Institute for Asia and Asian Studies, the summer India studies program comes in the wake of Fr. Jenkins’ recent travels to Asia and the announcement of the University’s partnerships with various Asian universities.“We wanted to keep up with the momentum of India being important on campus,” she said.The summer India studies program will allow students to spend two weeks at the St. Xavier’s College in Mumbai while earning three Asian Studies credits, Suhardjo said.“It’s a specially designed program with nine different modules, anything from popular culture, to traditional Indian art, to history,” she said. “It’s going to be a kind of survey introduction to India for any students interested, anyone who wants to get a sense of India, on the ground in India.”Suhardjo said student interest also contributed to the creation of the India summer studies program.“I had met with students at the end of last year, who had either been to India or were from India, and they were saying that Notre Dame just doesn’t have enough [classes] about India,” she said. “This is a way to speak to those concerns and those wishes, for something to do with India programmatically.”  Steph Wulz | The Observer Suhardjo said the summer program is just the first of several programs the University plans to develop with the intent of building stronger ties with India.“There are also some programs in the works for exchange programs, and we’re hoping after this pilot run of our summer India studies program that we can build this from here and make it bigger and better, to have it apply to University requirements,” she said.Students from all majors are encouraged to apply to the program, Suhardjo said.“India is going to be such an important player on the world stage that it’s important for everyone to really think about India on a deeper level, and get to know it and understand its position in the world,” she said. “It’s open to people who are looking to build Asia as a concept in their degrees, so it’s definitely something we’re hoping to get everyone involved and interested in.”As for the Asian Studies Seminar, Suhardjo said this one-credit course is built around a series of guest lecturers and will take place this semester from March 27 to April 4.“It’s a way for us to encourage students to connect with really important, prominent scholars that are coming to campus,” she said.The guest lectures are open to the public, but Suhardjo said visiting scholars will additionally lead small class sessions for students in the Asian Studies Seminar.“This semester we have a couple of very prominent scholars coming from China, and they will be discussing China today, in a historical and religious context,” she said. “One is speaking about the cultural diversity of rural areas, and another will be speaking about philosophical Daoism and Confucianism in China today.”Suhardjo said these programs aim to promote a deeper awareness of global interaction among students.“Both China and India are important, and these programs are a way for us to make sure the Notre Dame community is linked in to what is going on in Asia and seeing how the world is interconnected,” she said.Tags: Asian studies seminar, China, India, Liu Institute, study abroadlast_img read more

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ND students studying in Santiago relate experiences of earthquake

first_imgTraveling abroad can be an overwhelming experience, even without a natural disaster.For junior John Huber, one of 13 Notre Dame students spending the fall semester in Santiago, Chile, the 8.3-magnitude earthquake that struck the country Wednesday was “an interesting welcome to Chilean culture.”“When the earthquake was going on, I felt a mixture of excitement and uncertainty,” Huber said in an email. “… I think our group as a whole was a little bit shaken, but we’re completely fine.”According to an article from The Weather Channel, the earthquake — which was centered 145 miles north-northwest of Santiago — resulted in 15-foot tsunami waves along Chile’s coastline, as well as tsunami warnings in locations as far as Hawaii, California and even Japan. The same article said the earthquake has directly or indirectly caused at least 11 deaths.All 13 Notre Dame students studying abroad in Santiago were unharmed.Junior Rachel Francis said her parents were visiting her from the U.S. when the earthquake hit. They had taken a trip to the coast and were preparing to go out to dinner when they felt the first tremors, she said.“I felt pretty terrified initially and was having a hard time rushing to get my shoes on, but at the same time felt this need to stay calm, especially for my parents,” Francis said in an email. “Chile is such a seismic country, and I had felt some really little tremors before, but nothing like this.“And I just felt the need to kind of guide my parents — it felt like the roles were switched — because they were here visiting me in my now second home.”Junior Jackie Bruns said from what she’s seen, the earthquake has caused relatively little damage to the country’s capital.“I was in the metro when the earthquake happened,” Bruns said in an email. “I only knew it was happening because all the little old ladies stopped and looked up at the lights swinging above them.“You couldn’t feel much in the metro. But once I got home, I could feel the aftershocks which were actually pretty big. I live in an apartment on the 19th floor, and all the paintings were swaying and it was pretty crazy.”J. Nicholas Entrikin, vice president and associate provost for internationalization, said the University took immediate action upon receiving news of the earthquake. Notre Dame has a standard procedure in place for establishing contact with students and their host families in the wake of national disasters, he said.“As soon as we heard about the event, which was just a couple hours after it happened I think, we started our basic communication process to make sure that everyone was safe,” he said.Much of the responsibility for contacting students in the aftermath of the earthquake fell to director of the Notre Dame Santiago program Esteban Montes. Montes said in an email that in such circumstances, Notre Dame has “a very clear protocol to follow.”“The first thing is to do is to gather information from all students in order to know how, where and with whom they are,” Montes said. “So I immediately assumed that task until I was sure every student was okay and safe.”This is not the first time Notre Dame has dealt with an event like Wednesday’s quake in Chile. Entrikin said several years ago, the University had to evacuate students studying in Japan following the 2011 tsunami and subsequent nuclear meltdown.“We monitor the situation as best we can, we have people on the ground — those are our usual points of contact,” he said. “… Each situation is unique but we have a protocol for reaching out to students and staying in close communication with them.”Editor’s Note: News Editor Margaret Hynds contributed to this report.Tags: chile, earthquake, natural disaster, Notre Dame International, study abroadlast_img read more

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BAVO hosts Green Dot Activism Week

first_imgEric Richelsen The Saint Mary’s Belles Against Violence Office (BAVO) is hosting a Green Dot Activism Week at the College to encourage students to take action against sexual violence.Connie Adams, director of BAVO, said “Green Dots” are simple decisions made to make communities safer and can include actions, words, behaviors and attitudes that express an utter intolerance for violence and promote safety and support.“‘Green Dots’ are moments when we take ownership over our community and demonstrate that violence is not one of our community values,” she said in an email.The YWCA will be on campus Tuesday at 7 p.m. in Stapleton Lounge to share information about how to support a friend or family member who has experienced power-based personal violence, Adams said.“It can be difficult to know what to do when confronted with a situation directly, especially because we could know the person who was victimized or who perpetrated the act,” she said.A “green out” is scheduled for Wednesday, Adams said.“It’s a simple act to wear green to demonstrate the fact you care about this issue, but imagine how powerful it will be to see green everywhere,” she said.Adams said nationally-known speaker Tom Santoro will be on campus Thursday at 7 p.m. in Rice Commons to deliver a presentation on dating violence and warning signs.“Mr. Santoro has been touring the country for nearly two decades, and he is retiring from this work,” she said, referencing Santoro’s public speaking on his and his family’s traumatic experience with dating violence. “We are his final presentation of ‘Dear Lisa.’ He also shares a powerful personal story.”Other events this week include signing a pledge to be an active bystander and frosting a cookie in the dining hall, Adams said.“We will also have a display of red solo cups in the Student Center Atrium demonstrating the number of students impacted by sexual assault based upon the national statistic,” she said. “These are the ‘red dots’ we want to change and can change.”Adams said it is easy to become overwhelmed, frustrated and helpless when thinking of issues such as sexual assault, relationship violence and stalking.“While these emotions are understandable, the truth is that we all have power,” she said. “When we think of the issue as simply a global problem, we overlook that we have an individual responsibility and opportunity to reduce violence in our community. … Green Dot is a form of social responsibility, a core component of our [College’s] mission and captures what it means to be an empowered woman.”Students should feel empowered by this week’s events and find new ways to make an impact, she said.“It’s not about everyone doing the same thing but finding the right action for each person. ‘No one has to do everything, but everyone has to do something,’” she said, quoting a Green Dot mantra.“When everyone asks [themselves], ‘What is my Green Dot?’ and discovers the difference they can make, then we will see a dramatic reduction in violence. I have no doubt.”Tags: Green Dot Program, ND, SMClast_img read more

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Shooter targets, kills athletics department’s consulting physician

first_imgDr. Todd A. Graham, a consulting physician in the Notre Dame athletics department, was shot and killed Wednesday at the age of 56, according to a South Bend Tribune report.“The University of Notre Dame joins with the community in mourning the death of Dr. Todd Graham, who served as a consulting physician in our athletics department,” University spokesman Dennis Brown said in a statement. “Our condolences go out to his family and friends, and our prayers are with them.”According to the report, Graham was targeted by the shooter, Michael Jarvis, after a confrontation between the two earlier Wednesday when, during an appointment, Graham had declined to prescribe Jarvis’s wife an opioid medication. Jarvis later returned to the medical complex and ambushed Graham, according to the report, then shot Graham twice in the head.University spokesperson Paul Browne has confirmed Jarvis was an employee at the University, serving in parking services and as a “seasonal greenskeeper,” according to the Notre Dame directory.In addition to his work with the University athletic department, Graham was a physical medicine and rehabilitation specialist at South Bend Orthopedics, according to the report.Tags: athletics department, Dr. Todd A. Graham, Michael Jarvis, South Bend Orthopedicslast_img read more

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Journalist Francie Diep discusses confronting her cyberbully

first_imgWhile technology is an ever-changing force, human emotions have always remained constant, journalist Francie Diep said when she visited Saint Mary’s on Thursday to share her experiences with cyber bullying as a teenager. A staff writer at The Pacific Standard living in Washington, D.C., Diep grew up in Washington state as the daughter of Vietnamese immigrants. Diep was working as a freelance writer in New York City when she decided to stray from her field of scientific writing and submit a personal piece to The Atlantic.On Sept. 30, 2014, The Atlantic published Diep’s article titled “Confronting My Cyberbully, 13 Years Later,” in which she detailed the three years of online harassment at the hands of a former friend. Diep said she met Amanda, her very real but fictionally named cyberbully, in the early years of middle school.“I was totally enthralled by Amanda,” Diep said. “We met our very first day of junior high. We were both 12-years-old, so that liminal age between when you’re a kid and when you start to become more interested in more grown up things.”Amanda was followed by a loyal band of girlfriends, who Diep said wore makeup, styled their hair and spent time loitering at the local mall.“I quickly became friends with them. Amanda and I in particular became close very quickly,” Diep said. “We would talk for hours on the phone after school.”The friendship lasted for about a year and a half before Amanda and the other girls decided it was time to exclude Diep from their group.“They all got on the phone and called me on my parents’ landline to tell me this,” Diep said. “Admittedly, I had a pretty dorky reputation in school, despite Amanda and her friends’ glamor.”This was Amanda’s modus operandi, Diep said, having already witnessed Amanda and her friends kick another girl out of the circle for threatening the group’s “cool” reputation.“We were all sitting [at lunch] and all of a sudden, Amanda started talking really loudly, saying, ‘I just can’t believe people who can’t take a hint. You don’t even like them, and they still follow you around like a dog,’” Diep said. “This girl started sobbing next to us. She was sitting right there and none of us said anything. I personally felt relieved that Amanda was willing to do this so that she wouldn’t hang out with us anymore … turned out Amanda was willing to do that to me, too.”In the following weeks, Diep said the group ran a campaign to make her unhappy at school, giving her the silent treatment while they pretended to whisper about her in the hallway. The bullying followed Diep home after Amanda found a way to access her Yahoo email account.“We were so close that she knew my password and she knew the answer to my security question, which was an inside joke between us,” Diep said. “She would sign in, delete all my emails and leave one mean note for me.”Diep said she began to develop a physical response to logging into her own email account, the anxiety of discovering a new message making her heart race and her hands shake. She would read Amanda’s notes, then quickly delete them.“One thing I really wish I’d done is save those emails and taken screenshots,” Diep said. “It’s hard to do in the moment because you’re reacting and it’s really freaky and you’re emotional, but if this ever happens to you, save screenshots. That’s the most powerful thing you can do to make sure this doesn’t happen again to you and to make sure that the person who does this will see some kind of consequences. But I didn’t.”Diep didn’t tell her parents about the abuse, and said she refused to change her email address because she did not want to allow Amanda to “win” by forcing her out of her own account.“I carried this with me for so many years,” she said. “Maybe if I just changed my email, I would have been less affected by it.”Amanda grew more creative, Diep said, accessing her calendar and setting threatening reminders.  These notifications, worded in first person and often set at midnight, reminded Diep of “her own plans” to kill herself.“I would feel totally alone reading this,” Diep said. “Another really weird thing about this was that it made me feel like Amanda was in my head.”After three years, Diep said the emails and reminders started to slow down. She applied to colleges out of state, and was accepted by UCLA.“Fast forward ten years: I’m in New York, I’m in my mid-twenties, I’m a free-lance writer,” Diep said. “This is my dream. This is what I’ve always wanted to do. Ever since I was a little girl, I knew I wanted to be a writer.”Despite living out her childhood dreams as a journalist in New York, Diep said the introduction of Facebook made Amanda’s online presence a permanent and prominent fixture in her life. She said she would scroll through Amanda’s photos, following her life almost obsessively, watching her get married, have kids and move to the suburbs.“I didn’t feel good about looking at these pictures,” Diep said. “It had been so long, I just wanted to get over it. So I started telling some of my friends what had happened to me.”Her friends, mostly writers and producers themselves, encouraged Diep to take her experiences public.“I started turning the idea over in my mind,” Diep said. “Coincidentally, The Atlantic put out a call for itches about stories about how technology affected your life personally.”After The Atlantic accepted Diep’s pitch, she set about contacting Amanda.“I wanted to get as much out of her, what she was thinking, why she did this, as much insight as possible,” Diep said. “So I started messaging her through Facebook. Turns out, I was still scared of Amanda. I would get the same freaked out … feeling every time I messaged her. I started to hate the Facebook pop.”Diep said it took a long time for Amanda to open up about the cyberbullying, and though she apologized, gave little to no explanation for her actions other than the pettiness of adolescent girls.“I tried really hard to put myself in the headspace of my thirteen-year-old self when I wrote this story,” Diep said. “I tried to recreate the feelings for the reader, and I tried to tell painful truths plainly.”The story was published, and Diep said she received complimentary emails from editors inviting her to contribute to different publications, as well as a surprising feeling of closure.“An unexpected result of this was that I stopped wanting to check Amanda’s pictures,” Diep said. “It was amazing. I haven’t checked them since I wrote that story. I felt really free after I wrote that story, and I didn’t know how trapped I felt until I wrote that story. It was an incredible experience.”Tags: cyberbullying, Francie Diep, The Atlantic, The Pacific Standardlast_img read more

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‘Philosophical Fight Club’ debates God and the good

first_imgTuesday night, students from philosophy class “God and the Good Life” hosted “Philosophical Fight Club” at 8 p.m. in DeBartolo Hall. The event featured a debate between philosophy professor Meghan Sullivan and theology professor Fr. Kevin Grove, and functioned as a mid-term project for some 20 students in the class ranging from freshmen to juniors.Sullivan, who teaches the class, said the assignment was an open “campaign” for the students.“They’re just supposed to do something good and then talk about the philosophical argument behind it,” she said.Sophomore Joe DelleDonne said the group planned this event as their campaign project because they wanted to mirror the debate format of the class.“We do this kind of structured debate for our God and the Good Life class, and we really love them. People get really into them because they’re always centered on topics related to our daily lives,” DelleDonne said. “If you take a step back, it’s all sort of one-sided. We’re really curious about what our professors think, and specifically how they think.”Sophomore Nicole Skora said she is excited for the different perspectives from the two professors.“It’s one thing to see them lecture on it, but it’s another to see them debate their own craft,” she said.The central question of this debate was originally raised in a Platonic dialogue during the Golden Age of Athens regarding the Greek gods and adapted to Christianity: are good things good because God prefers it, or does God prefer it because it is good? Grove presented the former argument, and Sullivan presented the latter. Each made opening statements, followed by rebuttals, and then opened the discussion to questions from the audience.Sullivan opened the discussion with her argument, saying that God adheres to a moral code.“Being a good judge means you have reasons for the sentences you hand down, and those reasons are based on morally relevant facts,” Sullivan said. “They’re not just based on your whims at a particular moment.”She said that following a moral code does not mean God is any less powerful.“These principles, they’re not things like rocks or trees or even people. They’re necessary laws. And there’s no meaningful sense in which you can create a necessary law,” Sullivan said. “We already believe that there are some facts that could not be otherwise, because all the facts about God are exactly those kinds of facts.”During his opening statement, Grove argued that God is the standard for moral codes.“We have to start this conversation with the question of where goodness comes from,” Grove said. “There’s a temptation to define the goodness of God through some other thing: some property, some exertion. What’s the problem with that? It makes the other circumstances greater than God.”Grove said that the Biblical example of the story of Abraham and Isaac helps show God as the true basis for morality.“If we don’t vest goodness in God’s own self, we miss that shining moment in the story of the binding of Isaac in which Abraham was able to rise above his own self-interest to be governed by the covenant for which he was created,” he said.In the rebuttals, each professor addressed weaknesses in each other’s and their own arguments. In reference to Grove’s argument for a God who does not need to follow a moral code, Sullivan said that is not what is looked for from God.“Surprises are great, but I don’t want moral surprises from God,” Sullivan said.Meanwhile, Grove said that there were issues with Sullivan’s position on how to define good.“The temptation for Abraham is to try and micromanage his covenant, to forget trusting God and take it over himself. This is my worry about Professor Sullivan’s position: that we, by defining the good outside of God, take over the management under the auspices of our own reason.”During the open forum section of the event, topics for questions ranged from the Eucharist to the transfiguration of humans, and even to whether using the term “good” makes this discussion a false question.Tags: Debate, Meghan Sullivan, Philosophical Fight Club, philosophy, Platolast_img read more

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Chinese students respond to supply shortages throughout hospitals in Wuhan City in the midst of coronavirus outbreak

first_imgThe outbreak of coronavirus has killed 213 people and sickened 9,720 in China as of Jan. 30, according to the People’s Daily, the largest official newspaper of the Chinese Communist Party.The epidemic began in Wuhan, the capital city of Hubei Province. Cases of the virus have since turned up in 19 countries, including the United States where six people have been diagnosed. On Thursday night, the State Department issued a travel advisory telling Americans to avoid traveling to China because of the health risks of the outbreak.Diane Park Hospitals in Wuhan are facing a severe shortage of medical supplies, including N95 respirator masks, protection suits, goggles and coronavirus testing kits. Posts from doctors requesting donations are widely spreading on the internet, and some Chinese students at Notre Dame are responding with help.Yizhi Hu, who graduated from the Department of Political Science in 2019, established the donation network with a group of volunteer students and alumni from Notre Dame, the University of Chicago and other schools in the Greater Chicago Area. The network is comprised of logistics, procurement, communication with suppliers and hospitals, publicity and legal compliance, Hu said.“We established this network so people who have resources can directly provide their help to hospitals,” she said. “If you have purchased medical supplies in America, we can help to contact international logistics channels. If you have a bunch of masks in China, we can ask voluntary truck teams to deliver them.”The posts asking for support have been largely spread through Facebook, Instagram and WeChat, a Chinese messaging and social media app. The Chinese Students Association of Northwestern and University of Michigan helped spread the word.“We unite everyone’s power together, so we are able to accomplish something that is hard for a single person to do,” Hu said.As of Jan. 30, the group had raised $15,000 and delivered 50,000 N95 respirator masks and 1,500 protection suits to over 40 hospitals in Hubei Province. On Jan. 31, 150 goggles will be transported from Chicago to Shanghai, before being delivered to the Union Medical of Wuhan. The group plans to purchase and deliver more goggles.The network was built up from scratch, Hu said, with the initial network coming together after a number of phone calls made to the staff of 40 hospitals in Wuhan.In these phone calls, the group asked hospital staff to list the supplies they needed. They then worked with other groups and associations such as Wuhan Jiayou, (Chinese) International Students in North America and the China Chamber of Commerce to build the logistics channels to China from Boston, New York, Los Angeles and Chicago.In order to ensure the donations meet official standards, Hu said one of the team members listed the types of masks that fit within these standards. Notre Dame law student Wuyue Wang also helped with the process.But the policies around receiving foreign donations are confusing and subject to change.On Jan. 23, foreign donations were rejected, according to the Wuhan Headquarter of Prevention and Control of Coronavirus. But on Jan. 26, Wuhan Red-Cross announced that foreign donations was permitted and would be uniformly managed by Wuhan Red-Cross.According to the China Youth Newspaper, hospitals forbid doctors from receiving donations.“The government changes their policy every single day, and we have no idea when and in what identity our medical supplies are able to pass the custom,” Hu said. “In order to cope with this uncertainty, we ship our supplies to Guangzhou and Shanghai, and voluntary truck teams deliver them to Wuhan.”Even the necessity of supplies is uncertain.On Jan. 23, the governor of Hubei Province said the medical supplies in Wuhan were sufficient, while at the same time, large amounts of doctors were posting on social media about the severe shortage of medial supplies and urgently requesting donations.Kay Xu, a member of the voluntary Chinese students group who graduated from Mendoza Business School in 2016, said that they directly contact doctors to avoid being affected by the lack of transparency from the Chinese government.“All the demands are told by doctors or hospital staff in our chat groups on WeChat,” Xu said. “They are on the first line of battle. If they say it’s urgent, it’s urgent.”When the first donations arrived in Wuhan on Jan. 26, the large hospitals found their supply shortages alleviated, Xu said. However, smaller hospitals and those outside of Wuhan were still severely lacking.“That’s why our supplies are distributed to 40 hospitals to keep balance,” Xu said. “We know doctors are forbidden to receive donations but we have no choice. Wuhan Red-Cross is ineffective in distributing supplies and some volunteers don’t really trust it. Also, if we send supplies to the official department of hospitals, in some cases the official staff just put the supplies in a room, locked the door and doctors got nothing. Therefore, our strategy is sending supplies to specific doctors in specific hospitals.”Although Notre Dame students and alumni are busy, they all try to set aside time to help, Hu said.“I feel lucky about being in America, and thus I feel responsible to bring resources to China for people fighting against coronavirus,” Hu said. “I’m really, really painful when watching the news. It’s the Chinese New Year and the doctors don’t even have decent food to eat. They left their husbands, wives and kids, vying for going back to hospitals to rescue lives. It’s just so moving and so sad.”Hu is originally from Wuhan, and currently works in Chicago. In order to dedicate enough time to set up and coordinate the donation network, her work has taken a back seat.In the past few days, she said she has woken up to find around 2,000 messages about the donation network. She usually spends the whole day on the phone and goes to sleep at 1 a.m., at which time the volunteers living in China head to work.“We had large progress but we are too tired to feel happy,” Hu said.So far, most of the students engaging in the donation network are Chinese. Senior Betty Qi, a member of the Chinese voluntary students group, said that they hope more American students and departments of Notre Dame will get involved.“Not only Chinese students, but Asian students … all the students and school departments can help us and reach out needed resources and get through this hard time together,” Qi said. “As a part of Notre Dame community, we should all contribute to create a caring environment.”However, some Chinese students said they have experienced discrimination due to the outbreak of coronavirus in China.In response to these experiences, Dennis Brown, University vice president for public affairs and communications said that “the University has been caring for our students from China, and encourage any students to reach out if additional support is needed. Any student who is experiencing or knows of any harassment and discrimination is strongly encouraged to file a report through speakup.nd.edu or the Office of Community Standards so that the University can assist and respond.”The University does not believe there is public health risk to the campus at this time, Brown said in an email.“University Health Service worked with Notre Dame International to identify recent students from Wuhan or travelers from the region, and then reached out proactively and confidentially to the relevant students with education and offers of support,” Brown said. ”International Student and Scholars Affairs staff is available as a resource for all international students, and they have referred any concerned students to appropriate campus resources.”The University will not suspend next semester’s international programs to China at the moment, according to Michael Pippenger, the vice president and associate provost for internationalization.“We are monitoring events closely to support our students, faculty and staff in this current moment,” Pippenger said in an email.Don Bishop, the associate vice president for undergraduate enrollment, said that the University “[does] not expect that this health issue will impact our recruitment and enrollment of students from China.”“We do not expect to make admissions decisions with this issue affecting decisions,” Bishop said in an email.Notre Dame International advises all travelers to avoid all travel to Hubei Province and reconsider any non-essential travel to mainland China in the near term given the fluidity of the outbreak and travel restrictions imposed by the Chinese government. Any student or staff member who returns from mainland China is advised to seek out a screening from University Health Services or the Notre Dame Wellness Center.Tags: China, coronavirus, Donations, hospitals, Hubei Providence, International students, supply shortages, Wuhanlast_img read more

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Woman Arrested Following Month Long Burglary Investigation

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) WNY News Now File ImageLAKEWOOD – A Sherman woman was arrested and charged following a several month long burglary investigation in the Lakewood area.The Chautauqua County Sheriff’s Office says deputies started looking into a burglary and fraud case stemming from an incident on Fairmount Avenue in November 2019.Following the inquiry, Chelby Murray, 28 was taken into custody Tuesday.Murray is charged with two felony counts of first degree criminal possession of a forged instrument and two counts of petit larceny. Deputies say Murray was taken into custody without incident and was brought to the Chautauqua County Jail for centralized arraignment.last_img read more

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