Charity in crisis over costs

first_imgCharity in crisis over costs AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Sports presenter Tracy Piggott raised ‚€70,000 for Self Help at a star-studded ball last year, but left the aid organisation shortly afterwards to set up her own charity Playing for Life where all the administration costs have been met out of her own pocket. The charity boasts on its website: “Donations, large and small, are being utilised in the most cost-effective ways.” But some supporters were annoyed to discover that the financial statement for 2004 showed ‚€143,087 was spent on the charity’s ’20th anniversary expenditure’. The charity received more than ‚€2.4m of taxpayers’ money from a Government grant, and just over ‚€300,000 directly from other charities, in 2004. But a legal stipulation means a maximum of four per cent of the Government grant can be spent on administration, meaning at least ‚€828,000 of the ‚€925,049 administration costs for the Irish office had to be taken directly from money donated by the Irish public. Property developer Jarlath Sweeney is one of a number of high-profile supporters who have recently become disillusioned by the Irish charity’s management style and administration costs. Mr Sweeney was so outraged by the high administration costs he and businessman Dermot Divilly set up their own charity the Support Africa Foundation which they have promised will deliver 100 per cent of the funds it raises directly to Africa. As the first ever GAA Charity of the Year, Self Help is particularly well supported in rural areas where it enjoyed the backing of all the country’s main farming organisations. A GAA spokesman said that if there were any administration problems they would review their involvement. Self Help was founded in response to the Ethiopian famine of 1984 by Dr Noel McDonagh and missionary priest Fr Eoin Lambert. Dr McDonagh retired as board chairman in March and his daughter Hilary McDonagh is the CEO. A leading Irish Third World charity is in crisis after it emerged that close to a quarter of the charity’s overall budget, most of which is grant aid from the Government, was spent on administration and fundraising costs. Self Help Development International had a budget of ‚€4.1m for its work providing famine and poverty relief in five African countries in 2004, but spent ‚€925,049 of this on “management, administration, fundraising and promotion” costs. The revelation has led to bitter in-fighting at Self Help and former company members are seeking to overthrow the current board. In a further blow to the charity, a number of wealthy patrons have walked away and set up their own aid organisations. The most recent accounting figures show more than ‚€1.3m was raised for Self Help from public donations in 2004 and the ‚€925,049 administration and fundraising cost was taken directly from this money. Advertisement Tagged with: Irelandcenter_img Howard Lake | 17 May 2006 | News  27 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

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Accused don declared fit for prison

first_imgOxford University professor Tariq Ramadan has been declared medically fit for prison despite reports of his suffering from multiple sclerosis and another “severe chronic illness”.The academic was hospitalised last week after 12 days in a Paris jail.His family claims on their site ‘Free Tariq Ramadan’ that the medical report which found him fit for prison is “going against science”.Ramadan’s wife, Iman said: “I’m not sure right now that he’s receiving a fair and just treatment.”The site claims that “his health continues to worsen every day” and they have heard that in prison he is “unable to feel his legs”.The 55 year old Islamic scholar, charged with rape and rape of a vulnerable person, is awaiting trial in France.There have also been allegations in the Swiss media of sexual misconduct against teenage girls in the 1980s and 1990s.A court ordered Ramandan’s detention earlier this month ahead of the trial on the grounds that he was a possible flight risk.He was denied bail four days into his custody in France.Ramadan’s case is one of the most prolific in France to come out of the “Me Too” and “Balance Ton Porc” (“squeal on your pig”) campaigns.Henda Ayari, a feminist activist, first described an alleged rape in Paris two years ago, in her book I Chose to Be Free. However, she did not explicitly accuse Ramadan until October last year.She has since been placed under police protection following death threats.A few days after Ayari went public, a disabled Muslim woman, going by the alias Christelle, brought forward her claim that Ramadan raped and beat her in the French city of Lyon in 2009.After receiving Ramadan’s advice for months online, the woman arranged to meet him in the hotel bar where his confer- ence was being held.Ramadan, a Swiss national and grandson of the founder of Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood, categorically denies all claims made against him and says he is the victim of a smear campaign.Ramadan agreed to take a leave of absence from the University of Oxford in November soon after the charges became public, following backlash from students.At the time he said: “I have taken leave of absence upon mutual agreement with Oxford University, which will permit me to devote my energies to my defence while respecting students’ need for a calm academic environment.”A statement from the University said: “An agreed leave of absence implies no presumption or acceptance of guilt.”last_img read more

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Gratitude, excitement surround Graduate Commons Program leadership transition

first_imgThe Graduate Commons Program (GCP) will soon bid farewell to faculty directors Jim and Doreen Hogle, after seven years of service and mentorship to the Peabody Terrace community. They will retire to Vermont following a year of research at the University of Leeds (U.K.) where Jim Hogle — currently the Edward S. Harkness Professor of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology and director of the Hogle Lab — will be a visiting professor. Residents said they will miss their exceptional leadership, kind natures, and generosity of spirit.The couple are warm and inviting hosts whose monthly open houses and other events enabled residents of all ages and affiliations to find a support system within Harvard University Housing. They’ve hosted dozens of engaging speakers as part of their commitment to “learning outside of the classroom,” reinforcing GCP’s goal to build bridges between disciplines and cultures. Special guests included George Church of Project Genome and Harvard Medical School, Pulitzer-prize winning historian Annette Gordon-Reed, and visiting gender and identity scholar Keridwen Luis.When asked about their participation in the program, Jim and Doreen shared, “It has been a pleasure to work with the wonderful GCP staff and community advisors over the years, and a privilege to be part of the remarkably talented and engaging Peabody Terrace community of students and their families. It has truly enriched our lives, and we have learned so much from sharing with this group.”As the Hogles take this next step, Graduate Commons is excited to welcome new faculty directors, Vinny Manoharan, Michelle Carter, and their son, Samuel, to the Peabody Terrace community this August. Vinny is the Wagner Family Professor of Chemical Engineering and Professor of Physics, and the co-director of the Quantitative Biology Initiative at Harvard’s John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences and the Faculty of Arts and Sciences.“The Harvard experience isn’t just about academics, but also about being part of an amazing community,” said Vinny. “Unfortunately, as I learned through my work on the SEAS Committee on Diversity, Inclusion, and Belonging, not everyone feels that sense of belonging. The Graduate Commons Program goes a long way towards addressing that issue, and we’re eager to be part of it.”Michelle, a practicing painter, is assistant professor and chair of the Art and Design Program at Northern Essex Community College, where she teaches drawing, painting, and design foundations. Fostering community is key to Michelle’s work at NECC, which has many non-traditional students with significant responsibilities outside of school. “My colleagues and I create a supportive environment by getting to know all our students, organizing exciting events, and emphasizing strong communication.” said Michelle. “I’m looking forward to doing similar work with the Peabody Terrace community.“We’re grateful to the Hogles for cultivating such a welcoming community. We were drawn to this position because it’s a unique opportunity to live among and make connections between people from very different disciplines and backgrounds. We’re excited to get to know the residents!”last_img read more

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Bulldogs Beats South Dearborn Behind Roell’s No-Hitter

first_imgAlex Roell was brilliant on the mound on Thursday, as he threw a no-hitter to lead Batesville past South Dearborn 2-0.The pitching was strong on both sides. Senior Alex Roell earned the win for the Bulldogs and struck out two, while South Dearborn’s Rose sat down seven. Roell pitched five innings, giving up zero runs, zero hits, striking out two, and walking one. Rose took the loss for South Dearborn. He threw five and a third innings, giving up two runs, four hits, and striking out seven.The only runs on the day were from Jacob Christie’s one out double in the third inning, as he plated Trey Heidlage and Zach Britton.Jack Blomer, Jacob Christie, Joe Bohman, and Quinn Werner each managed one hit to lead the Bulldogs.The win makes the Bulldogs 8-5 overall and tied for first in the EIAC with a 4-1 record. Batesville will compete against North Decatur (10 am) and Connersville (6:00 pm) on Saturday evening.Courtesy of Bulldogs Coach Justin Tucker.last_img read more

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‘Nutty’ sets bar for success at Wisconsin high

first_imgEd Nuttycombe is no stranger to success. He has been the head coach of the Wisconsin men’s track and field team for the past 24 years — longer than many of his present runners have been alive. But one thing fans of any age can appreciate is what he has led the Badger harriers to do.After winning 22 Big Ten titles and the school’s first NCAA indoor track national championship, Nuttycombe was named the NCAA Division I indoor Coach of the Year.”It’s a great honor,” Nuttycombe said. “I never thought when I first came here that we could get to this point, but it’s here, and it’s something to be proud of.”Highlighting Nuttycombe’s 24-year tenure is an astounding 22 Big Ten titles between the indoor and outdoor track seasons. With one more title he would tie the late-Indiana swimming coach James Counsilman for the Big Ten’s all-time record for conference championships won, something he could accomplish within the next two months with the Big Ten Outdoor Championships just right around the corner.”I’ve been fortunate to have some great guys around me over the years,” Nuttycombe said. “We’ve had so many guys come through here. … That’s what you remember. The student-athletes I’ve had the pleasure of coaching and the assistants that have worked with us over the years — they’re the reason we’ve been so successful over the years.”A lot of people chip in in a lot of different areas, and our formula has been to have some good athletes at the top and to kind of overwhelm with numbers and depth.”That type of formula has become synonymous with Nuttycombe. Having a team with that sort of depth is one of the biggest reasons the cardinal and white have won 10 of the last 12 indoor Big Ten titles and nine of the last 12 outdoor titles. It also helps to have talented athletes on the team. In 24-plus years, Nuttycombe has coached 140 individual Big Ten champions, seven Big Ten Indoor or Outdoor Athletes of the Year and two Big Ten Freshmen of the Year.Because of the success his athletes have had, Nuttycombe has garnered his own accolades over the years. Nuttycombe has been named Big Ten Coach of the Year 18 times and Great Lakes Regional Coach of the Year seven times. With all the success he has had in the conference, however, it wasn’t until this year that the he truly put Wisconsin in the national spotlight.Having scored in the past 13 indoor NCAA championships and 20 of the past 23 outdoor is something some teams would be proud of. But for a team that has dominated one of the best conferences around, why was it so hard to take that next step and bring home a national title?”This year was our best year by far,” Nuttycombe said. “We had so much depth in our events. I think that was what helped us take this step and win it all. We’ve had great teams in the past, but the combination of athletes and a new assistant coach this year was probably what pushed us over the top.”Nuttycombe could not have asked for a more qualified new assistant when Mark Guthrie landed on his doorstep. Guthrie had spent the last 19 years as the head coach at UW-La Crosse, where he was a force to be reckoned with. If you thought Nuttycombe’s numbers were good, wait for this.While coaching the in-state Eagles, Guthrie’s teams won 21 Division III titles, sweeping the indoor and outdoor meets in 1988, 1991-93, 1997, 2001-04 and 2006. He was named National Coach of the Year eight times, as well as Wisconsin Intercollegiate Athletic Conference Coach of the Year 16 times. “I heard Ed needed another assistant,” Guthrie said. “So I called up and talked to Jerry (Schumacher, head cross country coach) first. I had already accomplished so much up at La Crosse that I felt I was ready to make take the step to Division I.”So I moved to Madison and started here. I didn’t really know what to expect at first, but Ed is such a great guy that it was easy from day one. Some head coaches like to dictate the whole team, but Ed trusts his assistants so much to let them coach. He brings us in to help set the foundation for what he wants. He’s the true architect of this program.”The program this architect has built is the best in school history. After winning the schools and the Big Ten’s first ever NCAA championship two weeks ago, Nuttycombe took a moment to reflect back at everything that has happened to him during his very successful career.”It’s amazing when you think about it,” Nuttycombe said. “I came here 27 years ago with my wife, not knowing where we would be in two years let alone 20. We didn’t know anything about Wisconsin. But after those first few years and even now … it’s home. We’ve raised our kids here, and now we’ve got a grandson here. Above anything else, this place is home.”last_img read more

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