Mediajump skyscraper

first_img  21 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Howard Lake | 6 March 2010 | News Mediajump skyscraper AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThislast_img read more

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No accounting for taskforces

first_img Comments are closed. No accounting for taskforcesOn 11 Nov 2003 in Personnel Today TheKingsmill report wasn’t worth the wait. It flunked the central question of howto effectively measure peopleAtToyota in the US recently, managers were shocked to get hold of the latestemployee survey. This showed that staff felt performance ratings wereirrelevant to pay and promotion prospects, while despite all the company’s talkabout the importance of training and gaining experience in different bits ofthe firm, doing so did not enhance careers. Indulge the bosses’ delusions was thecollective view.Inresponse, the company felt it really had to prove to its staff that performanceand training mattered. So it went back over several years’ records andestablished what had happened to people who were rated highly in appraisals,those who undertook development, and those who gained experience onassignments. Sure enough, they were better paid and advanced quicker thanothers who did not. The company could put numbers on how much better they did.The system was doing what it was supposed to. Thisstory comes from Play to Your Strengths*, a scholarly new book by fourconsultants at Mercer. It strikes me as a sensibly demystifying way of lookingat the mystifying subject of human capital. HR departments should borrow sometricks from marketing, the authors suggest. As well as finding out preferencesby asking people, marketers examine spending habits. HR should do the same withbehaviour. Modelling the statistical patterns of how workers respond to therules and rewards of an organisation (the book calls it ‘internal labour marketanalysis’), ‘the facts’ about the impact of HR become clear, and “thesay-do trap” can be avoided. Takeexit interviews, for instance. Pay is often the most popular reason for leavingbecause it is a socially acceptable motive, whereas telling the truth can burnbridges. Yet a company really does need to know why people leave. The solutionis to track behaviour. People may leave from a particular grade at a particulartime, in flight from a particular manager. Model how employees move through anorganisation statistically, counsels Mercer. An objective answer will emerge,and HR efforts can be directed accordingly. Mercercalls this “the new science of human capital measurement”, whichmakes it sound a little sinister, a little ‘Taylorist’ (see box). Yet while itmay be complicated, it also makes sense in a way that most things written abouthuman capital do not. Human capital, the book says, is “the stock ofaccumulated knowledge, skills, experience, creativity, and other relevantworkforce attributes” – in other words, the full gamut of labour servicesavailable to an organisation. ‘Human capital management’, meanwhile, is aboutquantifying the value of such attributes and managing on the basis of thatknowledge. It is, therefore, subtly distinct from HR. Thatseems clear enough. So contrast it with the definition of human capitalmanagement used in last week’s report from the Accounting for People taskforceheaded by Denise Kingsmill. Human capital management (HCM), it says, is “astrategic approach to people management that focuses on the issues that arecritical to an organisation’s success”. Itis hard to imagine a worse definition. What issues? What does ‘a strategicapproach’ mean? Could you not use exactly the same words to describe humanresource management? Is HCM just a repulsive new buzzword for personnel, then?If so, I’m sure we could live without it.Froma close reading of the Kingsmill report and related website, it soon becomesclear that contributors – those who don’t sound too mystified, that is – aretalking about wholly different things. Some use HCM as a new label for the sameold same old. Others see it (correctly, I would say) as the attempt to measurethe value of human assets and the effectiveness of HR interventions.CadburySchweppes, for instance, waxes in the report about its commitment to diversity,learning and careers – what most of us would call bog-standard HR. But there isnothing about linking these policies to performance. A more recognisablyHCM-inspired approach is demonstrated by the RAC motoring organisation. Thecompany has produced a “People P&L” (yuck), which quantifies thecost of turnover, retention and absence and uses them as performance indicatorsacross business units. Inother case studies, employee opinion surveys form the mainstay of attempts tomeasure the effectiveness of people management. There is a long pedigree ofsuch surveys in HR, and no-one would deny their value. But do they reallymeasure the effectiveness of HR programmes? Or, rather, do they simply reflectwhat workers think at any given moment – the ‘say-do trap’? Thetaskforce does not have a view. In fact, once the HR world stops being sograteful that the Government is interested in their subject, I hope they cometo see that the Kingsmill taskforce does not have a view about very much atall. To summarise: companies should be encouraged to report somethingpeople-related. In a few years, it hopes a consensus will emerge about whichcategories of information provide the most insight. For the moment, anythinggoes.Thetaskforce has thus flunked the central issue that makes Mercer’s book sotimely: how do you distinguish between an effective way to measure the impactof people management and an ineffective way. Meekly, the Kingsmill report saysthat out of all the well-known approaches – the Scandia Navigator, balancedscorecard, HR benchmarking, etc – “none is widely regarded as providing acomplete answer”. Well, that was worth the wait.Sohere is another distinction: there are taskforces that wait for a consensus andtaskforces that try to build one.‘Taylorism’in a nutshellFrederickTaylor wrote The Principles of Scientific Management in 1911. These principlesbecame known as ‘Taylorism’:–Develop a ‘science’ for every job, including rules motion, standardised workimplements, and proper working conditions–Carefully select workers with the right abilities for the job –Carefully train these workers to do the job, and give them proper incentives toco-operate with the job science –Support these workers by planning their work and by smoothing the way as theygo about their jobsHowever,in reality Taylorism changed the nature of the workplace forever, introducinghierarchical leadership, split locations for office and manual work, thedivision of labour, and changing the focus of business  to products and outcomes rather than theneeds of the customer. Perhapsone of the most insidious effects of Taylorism has been ‘office envy’ – when itcomes to offices, size seems to matter.”Theprincipal object of management should be to secure maximum prosperity for theemployer, coupled with maximum prosperity for the employee,” said Taylor.Source:Cornell University Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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The life and times of today’s CMO

first_imgIn the ever-changing world of brand marketing, the most volatile position is right at the top – the Chief Marketing Officer. Over the years, the role of CMO has been the subject of much scrutiny and introspection. If the “buck stops here” for the CEO, the “buck gets going” thanks to the efforts of the CMO. And that always gets everyone’s careful attention in the boardroom.Only The Strong Need ApplyNeil St. Clair observed “CMO” is “the most dangerous title around.” No doubt, most CMOs would agree. Estimates of average tenure range from 28 months (less than a coach in the NFL) to a little over 6-1/2 years. Better than the average life expectancy for most CEOs, but hardly destined for a corporate anniversary watch. Indeed, it’s the toughest job in the toughest business of brand marketing. And it keeps getting tougher.Survival Of The FittestMany long for the days when all a Chief Marketing Officer would do was, well, marketing. Mark DiSomma asked in “CMO TO CEO: The Next Generation of Brand Leadership” if the role of CMO would continue to evolve. Just two years later, we can answer a resounding “yes” … and the evolution hasn’t stopped. As Mark quoted Ad Age, CMOs will continue to require “vision, results and leadership.” But in today’s digital and dynamic competitive marketplace, the CMO will need so much more to survive and thrive. continue reading » 4SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Defense lifting Wisconsin to new heights in Eaves’ 4th year

first_imgMike Eaves brought a tough brand of hockey with him when he began his coaching career at Wisconsin in 2002. When he took the helm, he vowed to whip his team into shape with a healthy dose of discipline and hard work. He would also teach them how to play defense.Eaves’ first season was not as successful as he would have liked. His first team went 13-23-4 overall and finished eighth in the WCHA. The Badgers that year averaged just 2.3 goals per game while allowing 3.3 goals per game to the opposition.The Badgers improved their defense the next two years, giving up just 2.2 goals per game from 2003 to 2005. Now, the Badgers rank first in the country in team defense, allowing a paltry 1.44 goals per game on their way to a unanimous No. 1 ranking. “Our coaches are great teachers of the game,” sophomore defenseman Joe Piskula said. “They make sure we know everything we need to for any defensive situation.”Assistant coaches like Mark Osiecki and Kevin Patrick, both former defensemen, have made impacts with the team early on. Their success is evident in the way every player on the ice works together defensively, no matter what the situation.Players who have come to Wisconsin in the Eaves era have been asked to buy into his defensive system. Beginning with his first class, his teams have bought into that system, and the results have shown. Even with a lean offense, Eaves managed to squeak out wins with a defense that made opponents work for every goal.”Those kids bought in right away,” Eaves said of the first Wisconsin team he coached. “Our seniors and juniors, they’ve had a lot of reps at this now. It has almost become second nature to them.”Eaves’ defensive system isn’t complicated by any means. Even a casual hockey fan could understand it with a little practice. When the opponent has control of the puck, the Badgers leave one defender in front of the net while the other works the corner. One of the forwards goes down low to help the defenseman in the corner, and the other two forwards remain at the front of the defensive zone covering the slot and the point.The effectiveness of this defense comes from repetition in practice and in games. Players must make their reads and know how to position themselves. They must also have the discipline to worry only about their individual jobs.To this point, the Badgers have done just that. And as their opponents’ scoring average has gone down, Wisconsin’s scoring average has gone up. Wisconsin has averaged 3.25 goals per game this season overall, and 3.5 goals per game in league play, good for second in the conference.”Good defense leads to offense,” Eaves said. “One of the ways you can sell good defense is if we’re good when they have the puck, we get it back quicker. If I’m an offensive guy, that makes a lot of sense to me.”The Badger defense is led by the duo of Tom Gilbert and Piskula. The two have played side by side all season long, shutting down some of the country’s best players, including national scoring leader Brett Sterling of Colorado College and Minnesota’s dynamic freshman Phil Kessel, who were all but invisible when they went up against Wisconsin.”They’re both rangy guys. They’re both six feet or over. They both skate very well. Tommy gets a lot of the credit for helping a young man like Joe learn the game,” Eaves said of the duo.Added Piskula: “Tom’s just a great defenseman. He knows where to be with and without the puck. He’s always there to support you. I think I’ve found that role being there for him, too. We just click.”Players like sophomore Kyle Klubertanz, junior Jeff Likens and junior Matt Olinger have also bought into the Eaves system, filling out a talented Badger defensive corps.The defenders, as well as the forwards, have also learned one of the hallmarks of defensive hockey — blocking shots. “Osiecki and our coaching staff emphasized that and taught us the proper way to block shots. It really helps our team out,” Piskula said of his team’s shot blocking abilities.Forward Robbie Earl, perhaps the Badgers’ most offensive-minded player, summed up his team’s defensive efforts best. “You have to play defense to win championships,” he said.last_img read more

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Lily May wins Annika Invitational Europe

first_img20 Jun 2019 Lily May wins Annika Invitational Europe Tags: Annika Invitational Europe, Lily May Humphreys England’s Lily May Humphreys has won her third big title of the year with a wire-to-wire victory in the Annika Invitational Europe.The 17-year-old – who was immediately drenched by well wishers – was 12-under par after 54 holes, scoring a one shot win over the international field at Vasatorps Golf Club in Sweden.She’s the first English winner of the championship and she beat a field featuring the best female junior golfers in Europe. The 79 players represented 23 different countries and included five of the top-100 girls in the World Amateur Golf Rankings – including Humphreys, who is currently 26th.The win brings Humphreys a Ladies European Tour exemption into the La Reserva de Sotogrande Invitational hosted by Annika as well as coveted PING Junior Solheim Cup points.Humphreys opened with scores of 69 68 and held a three-shot lead as the final round got underway. Denmark’s Anne Normann chased her hard, shooting four-under on the front nine and drawing level after a fifth birdie on the 10th.But Humphreys moved ahead again with birdies on 14 and 16 and although Normann birdied the last, the title belonged to the English player.Humphreys said afterwards: “When Anne made three birdies in a row to get within one, the back nine became a bit edgy, but it was a fun day.”Annika commented: “Big congratulations to Lily May on the win and I look forward to following the future successes of all the players.”Humphreys adds this to the Welsh and Irish Women’s Stroke Play titles which she won earlier this season.Click here for full scoresCaption: Annika Sorenstam congratulates Lily May Humphreys (Image courtesy Annika Foundation)last_img read more

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Salvation Army to Hold Toy Distribution on Tuesday

first_imgRED BANK – Those who missed the signup dates for Christmas assistance from the Red Bank Corps of the Salvation Army have one more chance to get toys only.On Tuesday, Dec. 20, those who want toys for their children can come to the rear of the corps’ center at 180 Newman Springs Rd. between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m.The Salvation Army will require photo identification from applicants (driver license or another form of state identification or a passport). Assistance will be limited to Monmouth County residents.People may not apply who already are receiving or plan to receive holiday assistance from another organization, church or agency.Questions may be directed to the Red Bank Corps at (732) 747-1624.Children of Rumson Department of Public Works employees helped with the DPW’s annual toy drive this year. Pictured left to right are Michael Guinan, 11, and Matthew Guinan, 9, of Eatontown; Brodie Davidson, 6, and Taylor Davidson, 9, of Rumson. DPW workers and their elves collected more than 1,000 new toys which will be delivered to area charities to brighten the holidays for those in need this year.last_img read more

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With Slight Route Change, RB OKS Run For Haiti’s Children

first_imgBy John BurtonRED BANK — In a reversal of a decision made late last year, the Borough Council agreed last week to allow a charitable fundraising run in the borough this spring.The council last Wednesday conditionally agreed to permit the Race for Haiti’s Children 5K-run organized in part by Tower Hill-First Presbyterian Church, 255 Harding Road.The council’s approval was based upon a recommendation by the borough’s special events committee, which approved it with some conditions attached.This was a complete turnaround from a decision made by the committee and council back in early December when it denied the request to hold what would have been the second such run to raise money for Haiti relief aid.Mayor Pasquale Menna and Council President Arthur V. Murphy III said at that time the committee’s denial was based upon the impact the event would have on residents and businesses.The officials referred to a memo written by borough Police Chief Stephen McCarthy, who is a member of the special events committee. While noting it was for a worthwhile cause, McCarthy said it would likely inconvenience locals who face the same obstacles of closed streets and redirected traffic from the longstanding annual George Sheehan Run. “These types of events generate a great amount of displeasure and complaints from business owners and residents,” the memo stated.Adam Beacher, a Rumson resident who helps organize the event, said organizers asked the committee what could be done to change its mind. In response, Beacher said last week, organizers acknowledged their route was quite similar to the Sheehan run and worked with McCarthy to determine a route that would be less disruptive. “We changed the course completely,” Beacher said last Thursday.This new plan doesn’t’ require the complete closing of any of the streets along the route and runners would wind up at Red Bank Regional High School, Little Silver, using that as part of the course, according to Beacher.“It works out really well for us,” Beacher said, as the route would be safer this way.“We do have to have concerns over how it impacts the business district as well as the residential areas,” McCarthy explained. But now with the changed routes and other stipulations, “They conditionally satisfied all of our requirements,” McCarthy added.Little Silver police this week have signed off on the event and organizers now have to submit the appropriate paperwork, for such things as proof of insurance, to move forward, Beacher said.The run is slated for April 21 and Beacher said organizers hope to have up to 500 runners participating. Last year’s event had about 315, and 40 volunteers. It raised approximately $18,000 that went to such organizations as Aslan Youth Ministries, here in Red Bank, and Anita’s Children, doing humanitarian work in Haiti, according to Beacher.last_img read more

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Selects settle for Silver Medal, again, after dropping 2-0 decision to Prince George

first_imgScoreless at the half, the Timberwolves netter the only goal they would need 15 minutes into the second half.A rare defensive miscue by the Select coupled by some hard work by the Timberwolves led to Prince George scoring the winning tally past Nelson keeper Hanna Quinn.Looking for the equalizer, the Select moved defender Maya Ida to the striker position.However, it was the Prince George defenders that limited the Selects to no real good scoring chances before putting the game away with a goal minutes from the final whistle.”There was a time when it was a big deal for this program just to get into a medal game,” Bennett said after NYS squad won its third silver medal.“Now these girls don’t know anything else but winning medals. This cements the fact that Nelson has a terrific program and the younger girls in our community can see the success we’ve had and build on it.” Nelson, winners of Group one following round robin action, opened the tournament with a 3-1 win over host SurDel from Surrey Delta.The Selects then pounded Burnaby Girls Impact 5-0 before scoring a date in the final with a 1-1 draw against Vancouver.Meanwhile, Prince George won Group two by edging Penticton Pinnacles on gold differential after both teams finished with a 2-1 record. For the third consecutive year, the Nelson U18 Selects take home the silver medal at the BC Soccer Provincial B Cup.Prince George Timberwolves scored the game-winnng goal 15 minutes into the second half en route to a 2-0 victory over Nelson in the final of the U18 Girl’s Provincial B Soccer Championships Sunday in Surrey.The loss marks the third straight season Nelson U18s have finished in the runner-up spot at the Provincial B Cup.”It was a real tough one,” said U18 Selects coach Chuck Bennett following the heartbreaking loss.“Tough in the sense that we lost, but not tough because the way we played. If we managed a goal in the first half, I think we win the game by more than one. But once you leave it to the second half then you risk that one bad bounce that leads to a goal and you spend the rest of the half chasing.”Bennett & Company thought the Selects broke through against the Northern Reps 37 minutes into the first half when Shianne Michalchuk made some great moves through the middle before placing a nice pass to teammate Jodi Surina just inside the box.The only problem, Surina’s rocket of a shot rattled off the crossbar.last_img read more

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Govt, business unite against crime

first_img6 July 2007Business Against Crime South Africa, backed by over 250 CEOs through its association with the Industry Alignment Forum, has committed itself to an intensified partnership with the government in the fight against crime in the country.The partnership is starting to make a meaningful impact on violent organised crime, with the business coalition claiming successes in the priority areas of house robberies, vehicle hijacking and business robberies.Speaking after the release of the 2006/07 crime statistics this week, Business Against Crime CEO Siphiwe Nzimande cited as an example of the progress being made the police-led “flood and flush” operations which had “yielded over 5 400 arrests during the month of January to February.”By focusing on outstanding warrants and crime scenes, the SA Police Service (SAPS) had identified and arrested 298 suspects in April 2007 alone, Nzimande said, adding that the business-government partnership would ensure that these arrests received priority attention when it came to prosecutions.Through its partnership with the government, South Africa’s business sector has also completed and adopted minimum standards to regulate the cash-in-transit industry, while developing innovative crime prevention initiatives in the retail environment, particularly at shopping centres.Other support initiatives mooted by business include a more effective exchange of intelligence between business and the police, micro-dotting of business vehicles for easier identification, and more effective cooperation between the country’s private security firms and police.Organised business is also considering the design and implementation of improved cash management and the upgrading of close circuit television systems countrywide to support law enforcement and prosecution.The partnership between the government and Business Against Crime was strengthened further with the launch earlier this year of the Anti-Crime Leadership Forum, comprising four working groups co-chaired by government and business leaders.According to Nzimande, the working groups, whose task it is to come up with tangible crime-fighting initiatives, are busy finalising plans to mobilise society to fight crime, to tackle violent organised crime, and to review and improve performance in SA’s criminal justice system.Nzimande said he was confident that these and other initiatives would yield better results in the months to come, adding that information collected by businesses between April and June “confirms our cautious optimism”.At the same time, Nzimande said, “sustained work and commitment will be required by all who are dedicated to the anti-crime struggle”.SouthAfrica.info reporter Want to use this article in your publication or on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

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SA’s Kargo granted UCI pro MTB team status

first_img24 January 2014 In a first for the South African mountain biking community, the Kargo Pro MTB team has been accepted as a UCI MTB team by world cycling’s governing body. Phase one of team manager Shaun Peschl’s dream was realised on Tuesday when he received official confirmation from the UCI that his “team will be registered as a 2014 UCI MTB Team”, paving the way for the outfit to start their international journey and, hopefully, follow a similar pathway of success to that of South African road cycling phenomenon Team MTN Qhubeka, presented by Samsung.‘Thrilled’ “We are thrilled by the news that we can now officially call ourselves a UCI mountain bike team for 2014,” an ecstatic Peschl said in a statement on Thursday. “Looking at how far Doug Ryder has gone with his MTN Qhubeka team on the road, he has truly been an inspiration for us and we hope to have the same impact on the South African MTB scene,” he added. The UCI’s acceptance of the Kargo setup will see the “Proudly South African” outfit turn their full attention towards their short term goals while always bearing in mind their ultimate motivator: the Olympic Games.SA sponsors and bicycles “We really are very proud of the fact that almost all of our setup is South African. All our riders are from SA, our title sponsor, Kargo, is a South African company and even the bikes we ride, Momsen Bikes, are from here,” Peschl explained. “We had a really good pre-season and our season began nicely a couple of weeks ago. Now it’s all about fighting for every UCI point available. “Short term goals for us are to be as consistent as possible locally, to achieve good results at the UCI World Cups and the 2014 Commonwealth Games, and to have at least five of our riders compete at the 2014 World Champs, while our long term dream is definitely all about the Olympics,” he said.A major step in the right direction For the team cross-country ace Rourke Croeser, the news is a major step in the right direction, not only for the Kargo Pro MTB team but for the sport of mountain biking throughout South Africa. “It really is just great for cycling, and particularly mountain biking, in South Africa,” commented Croeser. “Hopefully this also starts a trend here in South Africa and other teams start taking competing internationally seriously as well. “The more UCI teams we have in SA can only be good for mountain biking in the country.” SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

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