Flood damage prevents petting zoo from reopening

first_imgThe Errigal View Petting Zoo has had to tell families the disappointing news that they cannot reopen this weekend due to flood damage. The petting zoo in Gaoth Dobhair was hit by flash floods on Tuesday 27th August. All the animals were taken to safely, but as heavy rain continued during the week, the owners were forced to close the farm to the public.It was hoped that Errigal View could reopen this weekend, but many parts of the zoo are still not ready for the public. “It was a lot worse that we thought,” owner Connie Gallagher told Donegal Daily.“The fencing is all damaged and the paths are unwalkable. We will try to open next week, but we want to tell people to follow our Facebook page for updates.”This video shows the extent of the flooding on Saturday: Video via Errigal View Pet ZooFlood damage prevents petting zoo from reopening was last modified: September 6th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:errigal view pet zooFLOODINGGweedorelast_img read more

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Loggers top Crusaders, advance to H-DNL championship

first_imgOlivia Stone had two goals and the Eureka High girls soccer team overcame a gritty defensive performance by St. Bernard’s for a 4-0 victory in the semifinal round of the Humboldt-Del Norte League tournament, Wednesday night at Albee Stadium.The No. 1 seeded Loggers (15-0) will face the winner of today’s match between No. 3 Arcata and No. 2 Fortuna in the H-DNL championship match on Saturday. St. Bernard’s (14-9-1), now done with H-DNL play, will await the start North Coast Section playoffs …last_img

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Sharks still seeking answers to Tierney-sized hole at third line center

first_imgSAN JOSE — One month into the 2018-19 season, the Sharks are still looking for answers to the major question that came out of the Erik Karlsson trade: who will fill Chris Tierney’s skates at third line center.Adding Karlsson to an already-deep blue line required the Sharks (6-4-3) to open a hole elsewhere in the lineup as they traded Tierney, who gave the team one of the league’s deepest center alignments by anchoring the third line.On Saturday, when the Sharks play their 14th game of the …last_img

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South Africans championing human rights

first_imgBesides the late Nelson Mandela, many other South Africans have stood up for human rights. Among their names, we can count people like Desmond Tutu and Miriam Makeba. They have all devoted their time and talents to improving the lives of all people.Human rights advocates have worked tirelessly to improve the world. Among their number is Desmond Tutu; there are many more. (Image: Kristen Opalinski/LUCSA, Wikipedia)Priya PitamberMany people have championed various human rights causes in South Africa. They were outspoken against abuses during the apartheid years, and remained advocates of human rights for all people in post-apartheid South Africa, some till their deaths.Desmond TutuDesmond Tutu’s hearty laughter matches his passion to improve the lives of people throughout South Africa and the world. Before he became a priest, Desmond Tutu, born in 1931, was a teacher. Following the introduction of Bantu education, however, he decided to join the church.In 1978, he was appointed the general secretary of the South African Council of Churches, where he became vocal about unjust racial laws. He climbed the ladder in the church: in 1985, Tutu was appointed the Bishop of Johannesburg; in 1986, he was chosen as the Archbishop of Cape Town, the head of the Anglican Church in South Africa – hence his affectionate nickname, “The Arch”.He was the first black person to hold the position, the highest in the South African Anglican Church. In 1987, he was also named the president of the All Africa Conference of Churches, a position he held until 1997.Tutu used his position to call for equality, and was a vociferous campaigner for human rights. In 1996, Nelson Mandela appointed him chair of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, the body set up to investigate human rights violations during the apartheid.Tutu acknowledged that bringing an end to apartheid was a collective effort. “In South Africa, we could not have achieved our freedom and just peace without the help of people around the world,” he wrote on Huffington Post, the American news site, “who through the use of non-violent means, such as boycotts and divestment, encouraged their governments and other corporate actors to reverse decades-long support for the apartheid regime.”Among other accolades, Tutu won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1984, the Albert Schweitzer Prize for Humanitarianism in 1986, and the Gandhi Peace Prize in 2007.Here is his simple message to the world:Helen SuzmanHelen Suzman was an anomaly in parliament – an English-speaking Jewish woman at a time when it was filled with and controlled by predominantly Dutch Reform male Afrikaners. She won her parliamentary seat as a representative of the United Party in 1953, and was an MP for over three decades, resigning in 1989.Throughout her years in parliament, Suzman remained critical of the numerous unjust apartheid laws. She was vocal in her opposition to the death penalty; she argued against banning the South African Communist Party, and she addressed gender discrimination.“For an astonishing 36 years, Suzman was a flickering flame of white conscience in apartheid South Africa,” British newspaper The Guardian wrote. “For 13 of those years she carried that light alone, a one-woman party in a parliamentary sanctum of hostile men.”But leaving parliament was not the end of her involvement in public life: she became the president of the South African Institute of Race Relations and was a member of the Human Rights Commission in a democratic South Africa.Suzman passed away in 2009; in an editorial, The Star newspaper described her as “an icon of anti-apartheid activism and a woman who took a fearless and often lonely stance during the darkest days of our recent history”.Miriam MakebaSinger Miriam Makeba helped to change the world lyric by lyric, yet insisted: “I’m not a political singer.” She told The Guardian: “I don’t know what the word means. People think I consciously decided to tell the world what was happening in South Africa. No! I was singing about my life, and in South Africa we always sang about what was happening to us – especially the things that hurt us.”Makeba came to be known as Mama Africa, along the way winning not only a Grammy Award for her music, but also the Dag Hammarskjold Peace Prize in 1986.In the early 1960s she addressed the United Nations. “I ask you and all the leaders of the world, would you act differently, would you keep silent and do nothing if you were in our place?” she asked. “Would you not resist if you were allowed no rights in your country because the colour of your skin is different to that of the rulers?”After the end of apartheid, Makeba continued her humanitarian work through the Miriam Makeba Rehabilitation Centre for abused girls and the Zenzile Miriam Makeba Foundation. In 2008, at the age of 76, she died after suffering a heart attack.Albie SachsIn an interview with Australia’s ABC, Justice Albie Sachs described being a judge as an extreme sport. As a law student, Sachs took part in the Defiance of Unjust Laws Campaign when he was 17. He also attended the Congress of the People when the Freedom Charter was adopted in Kliptown in 1955.He became a member of the Cape Bar when he was 21, taking on cases in which people had broken racist laws. It made him the subject of security police scrutiny, and eventually he was jailed. By 1966, he was forced into exile, first in England then in Mozambique. In 1988, a bomb placed in his car by South African security agents blew up, causing him to lose an arm and vision in one eye.But that did not stop Sachs from preparing for a democratic constitution. He returned to South Africa in 1990 and became part of the Constitutional Committee. After 1994, Mandela appointed him to serve as a judge of the Constitutional Court.Passionate about art, Sachs was instrumental in choosing many of the works of art on show in the court, the highest in the country. “One artist, Judith Mason, was listening to the Truth Commission processes on the radio while she was painting, and she heard the story of an African woman, a freedom fighter, whose naked body was discovered because the man who executed her pointed out where she’d been buried,” he told ABC about a particular work, The Blue Dress, “and the only covering the body had was a little bit of blue plastic bag over her private parts.“And Judith was very, very moved by this, and she went out and she bought some plastic bags and she sewed them into a dress for the person she called ‘My Sister’, and that dress is now hanging in our court.“And they represent a kind of a spirit of the sacrifice, the loss, the pain that was involved in the treatment of our democracy, but also the spirit soaring and the rights that are now protected.”Sachs was also instrumental in bringing about the Civil Union Act, which grants same-sex couples the right to marry. It made South Africa the fifth country in the world to grant such a right.Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

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Hawaii Tinkers With Its Solar Formulas

first_imgThe electric utility serving the Hawaiian island of Kauai is well on its way to replacing generating stations running on fossil fuels with utility-scale photovoltaic (PV) arrays that can handle a substantial part of the utility’s peak electrical load.The utility is in the process of completing a pair of 12-megawatt PV facilities at Anahola. When the second one is finished later this year, the facility will account for a sizable portion of the island’s total 78 MW peak power supply. On some days, the island’s solar arrays will meet 80 percent of the total load.It’s an enviable achievement for renewable energy. But as Peter Fairley writes in a post at the MIT Technology Review, the Kauai Island Utility Cooperative has learned that progress doesn’t come without some growing pains.The problem, Fairley explains, has been with the batteries that the utility installed to even out fluctuations in PV output. Current can drop by as much as 80 percent in less than a minute when clouds drift over the array, causing a variety of problems on the grid.The utility invested in lead-acid batteries, building a $2 million facility designed by Xtreme Power at a 6-MW solar facility that opened in 2012 at Port Allen. The batteries were capable of releasing 4.5 MW of electricity in short bursts, and the utility hoped they would eliminate some of the problems associated with lapses in power. That included a drop in the frequency of the alternating current on the grid to below the 60 hertz standard, a problem called “frequency droop,” which could damage electrical equipment belonging to customers.But the batteries degraded much faster than the utility had hoped. While they had been designed to last eight years, Fairley writes, they had very little capacity after just two years. A major Hawaiian utility alters its net metering rulesElsewhere in the islands, the state’s biggest utility, the Hawaiian Electric Companies (HECO), has proposed abandoning its existing net metering program by April and replacing it with a tariff system based on the wholesale cost of electricity.As reported at Greentech Media, the proposal to the Hawaii Public Utilities Commission this week is a way of transitioning to a new distributed generation program by 2017. By then, HECO promises a system that employs smart inverters, energy storage, and other technologies and makes it possible for customers to make money from renewable energy systems.In the meantime, solar advocates probably won’t like what they hear.During this transitional period, HECO proposes to pay customers who sell excess power to the grid a rate based on the wholesale cost of utility power. According to Greentech Media, the credit would be calculated as the sum of the Base Fuel Energy Charge, which is taken from the price of fuel, and the Energy Cost Adjustment rate, which lets each island to modify the base charge due to changes in fuel costs and the price of electricity it has to buy from independents.This month, those credits would add up to about half the island’s average retail electricity costs, which range from 31.2 cents to 37.7 cents per kilowatt hour, the highest in the country.Even with the reduction in payments, HECO said, the proposed credits should be high enough to pay off a 5-kW photovoltaic system in five to nine years.HECO says that its net-metering payments have grown from about $19 million at the end of 2012 to $53 million by the end of last year. It claims that the existing net-metering rules force more costs onto non-solar customers, and makes the state less attractive for utility-scale and community-owned solar and geothermal projects, Greentech Media said.The utility is concerned that the relatively high percentage of distributed generation — more than 15 percent on some circuits — causes a variety of problems on the grid. It has been working with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and SolarCity on research aimed at showing how programmable inverters will be able to relieve some of the problems. Lithium-ion batteries in a redesigned storage systemAlthough the utility might have tweaked the lead-acid batteries for somewhat better performance, other Xtreme customers were having problems, too, and the Texas-based company eventually declared bankruptcy.So the utility switched gears and chose a lithium-ion battery system manufactured by SAFT, a French company, Fairley says. The new batteries should be able to handle four to six times as many charge-discharge cycles as the lead-acid batteries, and the $7 million battery installation will be able to deliver 6 MW of power continuously and 12 MW in short bursts.The utility hopes that the increased capacity of the batteries will help ease the frequency drooping from the island’s other solar farms. Finally, when the PV facility at Anahola comes on line later in the year, there are times when solar output will exceed what the grid can carry. The batteries should be able to absorb some of the excess and distribute it at night.last_img read more

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7 hours ago​Rodgers rejects talk of Leicester as title contenders

first_img​Rodgers rejects talk of Leicester as title contendersby Ansser Sadiq7 hours agoSend to a friendShare the loveLeicester City manager Brendan Rodgers has rejected talk about them being title contenders.City are flying high in the Premier League, as they have emerged as the third best side in the league after Liverpool and Manchester City.But Rodgers knows that it is still a very early part of the season, and he does not think they have the depth to challenge for the title.He told reporters: “Yes [it is crazy to label Leciester as title contenders]. Everyone recognises that Liverpool and Manchester City are the top two teams. There is a group behind those.”We can’t forget what our objective was at the start of the season, that’s why we don’t get carried away with it.”We’re nine games in, we’ve made a very good start, and since we’ve worked together from February, the players have accumulated a lot of points and performed very well.”We’re very much at the beginning of where we want to go to and it’s a very long season. It’s been a very good start but there are lots of really good teams in the league.”I see the next game. That’s all I see. Football is very difficult to forecast.”I’m not one, especially now with more experience, I’m not one to forecast ahead over five games, 10 games, looking at so many points. Our focus is on the next game. That’s what’s most important for us.”Leicester last won the league against all odds in the 2015-2016 season. About the authorAnsser SadiqShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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1400 arrested at Moscow election protest

first_imgMoscow: Russian police arrested almost 1,400 people as they gathered in Moscow at the weekend to demand open elections, a monitor said, the biggest crackdown on a rally in the country in years. Some 3,500 people took part in the unauthorised protest on Saturday, according to official figures, after authorities blocked prominent opposition candidates from taking part in city elections. The meeting came a week after 22,000 took to the streets calling on authorities to reverse their decision ahead of the vote. Police used batons on protesters as they tried to gather outside city hall on Saturday, and AFP reporters at the scene saw demonstrators with injuries. Also Read – Saudi Crown Prince ‘snubbed’ Pak PM, recalled jet from USThe EU in a statement denounced the “disproportionate use of force against peaceful protesters,” which it said undermined “the fundamental freedoms of expression, association and assembly”. Amnesty International also condemned what it said was the use of excessive force by the police. After the rally last week investigators raided the homes and headquarters of a number of disqualified candidates. Top Kremlin critic Alexei Navalny was jailed for 30 days for calling the fresh protest. Also Read – Record number of 35 candidates in fray for SL Presidential pollsSeveral would-be candidates were detained before or during the meeting on Saturday. Among them was Ilya Yashin, who called for another protest next weekend. OVD-Info, an organisation that monitors protests, reported Sunday that 1,373 people were detained. It said this was the highest number since mass demonstrations in 2012, when tens of thousands protested President Vladimir Putin’s return to the Kremlin after four years as prime minister. The new protests come amid wider public anger over declining living standards that has hit Putin’s approval ratings. Elections to Moscow’s 45-seat legislative body, currently controlled by the pro-Kremlin United Russia party, are due to be held in September. While pro-Kremlin candidates enjoy the support of the state, independent candidates say they have been made to jump through countless hoops in order to get on the ballot for the city polls. Following pickets last week, including outside the local election commission building, investigators said they were launching a criminal probe into obstructing the work of election officials. If found guilty, organisers risk up to five years in prison.last_img read more

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Sailor testifies superior sexually assaulted him aboard Canadian destroyer

first_imgHALIFAX – A Halifax sailor has told a military court he woke up in his bunk to a superior performing oral sex on him while a navy destroyer was visiting Spain in 2015.The leading seaman was testifying Wednesday in Halifax at the standing court martial for Master Seaman Daniel Cooper, who is accused of sexual assault and ill treatment of a subordinate.The man, whose name is protected by a publication ban, said he left HMCS Athabaskan around 10 a.m. on Nov. 9, 2015, to have some drinks with other crew members in Rota, Spain. He said he drank a number of beer throughout the day at a hotel and restaurant and later in the evening he and Cooper returned to the ship in a taxi.He said the men had a few more drinks in the mess and eventually went to bed around 1 a.m. on Nov. 10, 2015 — but he woke up about three hours later as someone was performing oral sex on him.“I’m trying to figure out what’s going on. I’m in shock. I’m frozen stiff,” he told the court. “I’m not sure what to do.”The man said it was dark and he couldn’t really see, but the person performing the act was repeating a sexual phrase to him, and he recognized the voice to be that of Cooper, a naval communicator at Canadian Forces Base Halifax.He became emotional in the courtroom as he spoke about fearing for his safety and attempting to alert a crew member in the bunk below him — but he said his pleas for help went unanswered.“I said, ‘I think I’m getting raped’ … But he didn’t believe me. His response was, ‘You’re drunk and I have duty in a few hours. Go back to bed’,” he said.The junior sailor eventually told his alleged assaulter, “I’m not gay,” to which he replied, “Oh, sorry,” and left.The alleged victim said once Cooper left, the sailor in the bunk below him realized he had been telling the truth. He said that sailor convinced him to report the sexual assault, and his superiors were notified of the alleged incident shortly after it happened.He told the court he never invited Cooper into his bunk or consented to oral sex.Cooper has pleaded not guilty to both charges.During cross-examination, defence lawyer Maj. Philippe-Luc Boutin appeared to suggest the oral sex was consensual.He asked the leading seaman if he remembered becoming aroused while speaking with Cooper near the bunks after they left the mess, and a discussion about sexual activity.“I’m going to suggest to you … that your account of that night is not the truth,” said Boutin. “You made up a story because it was more convenient for you.”But the man flatly denied the suggestions in the defence’s line of questioning.“I was raped,” he said, speaking louder than previously.Boutin also pointed to inconsistencies in his testimony. He noted that he told the court Wednesday that he was “very drunk” when he went to bed early that morning, but told police days after the incident that he wasn’t that drunk.Before dismissing the alleged victim, Military Judge Cmdr. Sandra Sukstorf said: “Thank you for coming forward to tell your story.”The court martial continues Wednesday.Military commanders have promised to crack down on sexual misconduct in the ranks since retired Supreme Court justice Marie Deschamps reported April 2015 that she had found an “underlying sexual culture” in the military.Military police received 193 reports of sexual assault in 2017, more than twice the 93 reported in 2014. There have also been more charges, with 44 in 2016 compared to 24 in 2014.Follow (at)AlyThomson on Twitter.last_img read more

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American Pharoahs A Superhorse But Hes No Secretariat

After American Pharoah (sic) won this year’s Preakness Stakes, I warned you all to be skeptical of him in the Belmont Stakes.Oops.In my defense, I was technically being skeptical of any Triple Crown hopeful, not this horse in particular — and I (mostly) stick by that. But American Pharoah appears to be a legitimate superhorse.Indeed, he may be one of the most super superhorses in history (at least among American 3-year-olds). Like Secretariat, American Pharoah has broken a multi-decade Triple Crown slump. Like Secretariat, American Pharoah won all three races without much difficulty. American Pharoah won the 1.5 mile (12 furlong) Belmont Stakes in a time unmatched by any other Triple Crown winner (save Secretariat) in history. American Pharoah also led wire-to-wire, and won by an impressive five and a half lengths.But as great a run as American Pharoah had, it still didn’t really approach Secretariat’s. Picture how far ahead of the field American Pharoah was at the end of the Belmont. Now double it (multiply by 2.4 to be exact). That’s about how far American Pharoah would have been lagging behind Secretariat (13 ¼ lengths). In a Belmont field featuring the 11 Triple Crown winners running their Belmont-winning times, Secretariat would have led the other horses by the following distances:1I converted the difference between each horse’s finishing time to lengths using the typical rate of five lengths per second. Still, this is amazing company, and American Pharoah’s triumph is only the fourth Triple Crown since 1948.All that said, American Pharoah’s win didn’t clear up whether a horse that wins at 9.5 and 10 furlongs (the distances of the Preakness Stakes and Kentucky Derby, respectively) is likely to be able to win at 12 furlongs. The types of horses that win the Belmont may be more naturally calibrated to the longer distance.There’s some evidence of specialization in the race’s winning times. Since the Belmont Stakes moved to 12 furlongs for good in 1926, American Pharoah’s time is only seventh-best, with four of the six better times coming during the most recent drought:The most interesting thing about this chart is what we do not see: There hasn’t been a recent bunch of Belmont superhorses. In fact, Belmont times have been on the rise for the past 20-plus years, and their five-year average in 2014 (pre-American Pharoah) was the highest it has been since the 1930s.While this makes a win by American Pharoah a little less spectacular than if he had to fend off a troupe of ever-improving distance-running specialists, it makes his time – the best by any horse in over a decade (since Point Given in 2001) – even more impressive, relative to the recent trend.CLARIFICATION (June 7, 3:37 p.m.): An earlier version of this article included a chart that suggested it showed all Triple Crown winners’ Belmont finishes. It showed all Triple Crown winners’ Belmont finishers since the Belmont race was lengthened to 12 furlongs in 1926. read more

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