Olympic Spirit Track League Championship Results

first_imgThe Championship Meet for the Olympic Spirit Track League was held on May 31 in Gregg/Hudson County Park. Co-directors John Hnath and Al Long were ably assisted by coaches Sharon Nadrowski, Mercedes Alvarez; Justin Enes, Lauren Enes, Jose Bustamonte, Hans Parrado, Michelle Bernatowicz, Melissa Ingrassia, Danny Hernandez, John Nagel and other volunteers.Participating school:OLC – Our Lady of Czestochowa, Jersey CitySAS -Saint Augustine School, Union CityOLM – Our Lady Mercy, Jersey CitySt. Al’s-Saint Aloysius, Jersey CityAll Saints Academy, BayonneSt. Henry, BayonneSt. Francis Academy, Union CitySDA -St. Dominic Academy, Jersey City Girls:500 meters: 5 and under (2:27)1) Mikenna Raftery, St. Henry; 2) Sophia Z Amos, All Saints; 3) Anna Lauara Cupido Carlorosi, OLC; 4) Kelsey Kopacz, St. Henry; 5) Colleen Campbell, All Saints; 6) Samantha Terau, St. Al’s; 7) Caileen Raftery, St. Henry1/2 mile: 6 & 7 year old (3:20)1) Emily Palamino, St. Henry and Stephanie Pavon, SAS; 2) Jessica Kurdy, OLM; 3) Maika Rama, St. Henry; 4) Catarina Rubies, OLC; 5) Isabella Cintron, St. Al’s; 6) Hanna Schuitema, OLC; 7) Amanda Hitlan-Olesen, All Saints; 8) Isabel Colon, All Saints; 9) Amelia Bonifaz, St. Al’s; 10) Julia Rama, St. Henry1/2 mile: 8 & 9 year old (3:00)1) Livia Diakogiannis, All Saints; 2) Leyla Ziemba, St. Francis; 3) Amanda Thomas, St. Henry; 4) Mariana Puzycki, All Saints; 5) Julia Hester, All Saints; 6) Mara Ellerson, St. Henry; 7) Rowea Quintyn, St. Al’s; 8) Anais Veger, St. Henry; 9) Kristina Munoz, St. Al’s; 10) Miranda Shepard, All Saints1 Mile: 10 & 11 year old (7:16)1) Maggie McCabe, All Saints; 2) Victoria Okonkwo, St. Henry; 3) Kelly Hester, All Saints; 4) Anne Marie Clores, OLC; 5) Jaylyn Orefice, SAS; 6) Sofia Vacca, St. Francis; 1 mile: 12 and older (6:36)1) Charlotte Hennessey, St. Dominic; 2) Brigid McCabe, All Saints; 3) Sade Jimenez, St. Henry; 4) Christis Shepard, Sat. Henry; 5) Caitlin Quintos, OLM; 6) Elena Hernandez, St. Francis; 7) Isabel LeCompte, St. Francis; 8) Kyra Woss, St. Al’sBoys500 meters: 5 and under (2:20)1) Ryan Fersha, St. Henry; 2) Ben Cuttruff, St. Henry; 3) Zachary Ziemba, St. Francis; 4) Sebastian Diakogiannis, All Saints; 5) Ayush Thatte, OLC; 6) Daniel Barreto, OLM; 7) Michael Sharp, All Saints; 8) Michael McCabe; 9) Ian Kutney, St. Henry; 10) Alex Wilson, OLC1/2 mile 6 & 7 year old (3:17)1) Sam Geiger, All Saints; 2) Brayden Picciotto, St. Henry; 3) Gerard Hester, All Saints; 4) Willian Wang, OLC; 5) Darius Montecastro, OLM; 6) Jake Cuttruff, St. Henry; 7) Jayden Johnson, St. Al’s; 8) Connor Collazo, OLM; 9) Lucas Japaz, St. Al’s; 10) Alessandro Cupido Carlorosi, OLC1/2 mile: 8 & 9 year old (3:13)1) Lucas Hernandez, St. Francis; 2) Otavio Rubies, OLC; 3) Kyan Melendez, OLC; 4) Rohan Garg, OLC; 5) Jack Sanchez, SAS; 6) Jasper Schwamberger, OLC; 7) Jacob Vazquez, St. Al’s 8) Kaan Camelo, OLC; 9) Benjamin Castro-Matthews, OLC; 10) Wiebe Schuitema, OLC1 mile: 10 & 11 year old (6:32)1) Alex Califano, OLC; 2) Matthew Califano, OLC; 3) Tyler Nieman, All Saints; 4) Jayce Anthony Aquilar, St. Al’s; 5) Liam Hester, All Saints; 6) Brian Ellerson, St. Henry1 mile: 12 and older (6:08)1) Joshua Tauriello, St. Francis; 2) Alexander Zinkevich, St. Henry; 3) Luke Rostan, St. Henry; 4) Dominic Okonkwo, St. Henry; 5) Patrick Boll, St. Francis; 6) Shawn Orefice, SAS; 7) Aidan Mancha, St. Francis; 8) Joaquin Cepeda, St. Al’slast_img read more

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Tax Help

first_imgThe April 15 tax deadline is nearing, and many people have already filed their returns for free with help from the University of Georgia Cooperative Extension. And they received some financial education during the process.Using a grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, UGA Extension partnered with the Internal Revenue Service Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Program this year. Tax returns have been filed in Athens (350), Dalton (125) and Moultrie (64), all free of charge. And the program is still offering its services.“The grant was to increase financial education,” said Lance Palmer, assistant professor of financial planning in the UGA Department of Housing and Consumer Economics. “Tax filing creates a teachable moment for people, and we are able to implement some basic financial training.” Two-thirds of low- to moderate-income households have their taxes prepared by someone else, Palmer said. “This program is a way for us to fill a need and provide them with an education on ways to increase their refund through saving and planning,” Palmer said. Students majoring in family financial planning at UGA help to prepare the returns, along with students from Dalton State College and Moultrie Technical College.Andrea Scarrow, a UGA Extension agent in Colquitt County, focuses on financial literacy in her county and wanted the program offered there. “I knew if we could do something practical to get some money in people’s pockets we could reach a big portion of our community,” Scarrow said. She saw a cycle of people depending on refund anticipation loans to get through November and December. These loans typically have high finance charges, leaving less refund for the taxpayer. “I wanted to help break that cycle of poverty and offer some tax assistance,” Scarrow said. “We focused on the earned income tax credit, which is a great credit, encouraging and rewarding work.” The earned income tax credit offers as much as $3,043 in credits to families with at least one child. It is just one of many such credits available, said Joan Koonce, a UGA Extension financial specialist. Other credits include the child tax credit, childcare tax credit and retirement savers’ credit. “There are lots of new credits, and we want to help people get all the deductions and credits they can,” Koonce said. “Everyone should get all of the deductions and credits they are legally allowed.” Koonce prepared taxes in Moultrie and helped get a grant to partly fund the effort there. For eight days in February, volunteers prepared tax returns at a Moultrie community center and YMCA. Local banks shared financial planning information with people at each site and Extension publications were available on investing, insurance and using credit wisely. “There was a man whose grandson wasn’t receiving much of a refund, but it was his,” Koonce said. “In years past, the refund had been given back to the tax preparer. Those are the stories you like to hear.” “We had people sitting across from us with tears in their eyes. They were so grateful to have this service and actually took home all of their refund,” Scarrow said. “We were so happy to be there and help those that need it most.” If you haven’t filed your 2009 return, yet, Koonce says to: Save money and do it yourself if you can.Read the forms and refer to the IRS Web site to take advantage of all deductions and credits available.Prepare for next year by putting money in a retirement account and be sure to keep financial files organized and accessible. “If you are unsure if you need a receipt, keep it just in case,” Koonce said. Some people look forward to a big tax refund and use the income to splurge on a vacation or home-improvement project. Koonce says it is better to breakeven or to get a small refund at the end of the year.“You are letting the government hold on to your money for months when you could be using it to invest or for necessary expenses throughout the year,” she said.last_img read more

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WHO says China team interviewed Wuhan scientists over virus origins

first_imgThe results of the WHO investigation are keenly awaited by scientists and governments around the world, none more so than Washington, which lobbied hard for the mission. The Trump administration accuses the WHO of being China-centric and plans to leave the agency over its handling of the pandemic.”The team had extensive discussions with Chinese counterparts and received updates on epidemiological studies, biologic and genetic analysis and animal health research,” Christian Lindmeier told reporters, saying these included video discussions with Wuhan virologists and scientists.The three-week advance mission comprising two specialists in animal health and epidemiology was tasked with laying the groundwork for a broader team of Chinese and international experts that will seek to discover how the virus that causes COVID-19 jumped the species barrier from animals to humans.Lindmeier did not provide details on the timing or composition of the broader mission. Terms of reference for the broader mission have been produced together with Chinese authorities in draft form, he said, and were not yet publicly available.The team’s composition is bound to be sensitive since any exclusion of US experts would be controversial. Another question will be the degree of access granted by Beijing.US President Donald Trump and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo have said the pathogen may have originated in a laboratory in Wuhan, although they have presented no evidence for this and China has denied it. Scientists and US intelligence agencies have said it emerged in nature.WHO emergencies chief Mike Ryan said on Monday that surprises were possible.”The fact that that fire alarm was triggered [in Wuhan] doesn’t necessarily mean that that is where the disease crossed from animals to human,” he said. A World Health Organization team in China to probe the origins of COVID-19 had “extensive discussions” and exchanges with scientists in Wuhan where the outbreak was first detected, a spokesman said on Tuesday.The talks included updates on animal health research, he said. China shut down a wildlife market in Wuhan at the start of the outbreak, a day after discovering some patients were vendors or dealers.The WHO says the virus most likely came from bats and probably had another, intermediary animal “host”.center_img Topics :last_img read more

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Italy’s Serie A to resume on June 20

first_imgRome, Italy | AFP | Italy’s Serie A can resume on June 20 after a three-month absence in a country hit hard by the coronavirus pandemic, sports Minister Vincenzo Spadafora said on Thursday.“The Technical and Scientific Committee gave its agreement on the protocol and the federation assured me that it had a Plan B and a Plan C,” Spadafora said after a video conference meeting with Italian football chiefs.“In light of these considerations, the championship can resume on June 20.”Italy football federation (FIGC) president Gabriele Gravina assured the minister that there would be a play-off system if the championship were again interrupted.“We had a very useful meeting,” said Spadafora.“From the start, I said that football could restart once all the security conditions had been met and with the agreement of the Technical and Scientific Committee on the different protocols.”Spadafora said that Italian Cup semi-final matches, between Inter Milan and Napoli and AC Milan and Juventus, could be played the week before the championship returned.“Italy has started to return to normal life again, it is only right that football should do the same,” he continued. Share on: WhatsApp “I also hope to be able to send a positive signal to the whole country by taking advantage of the week from June 13 to 20 to conclude the Italian Cup,” he added with hopes of staging the semi-finals on the weekend of June 13-14 and the final on June 17.The announcement of the resumption of the Italian league comes just after the English Premier League confirmed it will restart on June 17.The German championship has already resumed and Spain’s La Liga will return to the pitch the week of June 11.Among the five major European championships, only the French Ligue 1 has been definitively stopped.No top-flight matches in Italy have been played since Sassuolo beat Brescia 3-0 on March 9, before the championship was suspended by a pandemic which has killed over 33,000 people in the country.Most teams have 12 games left to play, but there were four postponed fixtures.last_img read more

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Ali’s daughter: The Greatest is OK

first_imgBy Tim DahlbergAP Boxing WriterNEW ORLEANS (AP) — Muhammad Ali’s daughter knocked down rumors of her father being near death Sunday, saying he was at home watching the Super Bowl.May May Ali said she talked to her father Sunday morning on the phone and he was fine. She said he was watching the Super Bowl at home in Arizona, wearing a Baltimore Ravens jersey.“He’s fine, in fact he was talking well this morning,” she said in a telephone interview with The Associated Press. “These rumors pop up every once in a while but there’s nothing to them.”The family later posted a photo on Twitter of Ali sitting in a chair wearing a Ray Lewis T-shirt.The rumors were started by a report in a British tabloid quoting Ali’s brother, Rahman, as saying the former heavyweight champion was near death. Rahman, though, said he hadn’t seen his brother since last summer and had no contact with the family.The report was widely repeated on the Internet, drawing expressions of condolences on Twitter and Facebook.Ali suffers from Parkinson’s disease. He celebrated his 71st birthday last month. HANGING IN THERE–In this Jan. 2 photo, former boxing legend Muhammad Ali arrives at the Sugar Bowl football game in New Orleans. (AP Photo/Dave Martin)last_img read more

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With Slight Route Change, RB OKS Run For Haiti’s Children

first_imgBy John BurtonRED BANK — In a reversal of a decision made late last year, the Borough Council agreed last week to allow a charitable fundraising run in the borough this spring.The council last Wednesday conditionally agreed to permit the Race for Haiti’s Children 5K-run organized in part by Tower Hill-First Presbyterian Church, 255 Harding Road.The council’s approval was based upon a recommendation by the borough’s special events committee, which approved it with some conditions attached.This was a complete turnaround from a decision made by the committee and council back in early December when it denied the request to hold what would have been the second such run to raise money for Haiti relief aid.Mayor Pasquale Menna and Council President Arthur V. Murphy III said at that time the committee’s denial was based upon the impact the event would have on residents and businesses.The officials referred to a memo written by borough Police Chief Stephen McCarthy, who is a member of the special events committee. While noting it was for a worthwhile cause, McCarthy said it would likely inconvenience locals who face the same obstacles of closed streets and redirected traffic from the longstanding annual George Sheehan Run. “These types of events generate a great amount of displeasure and complaints from business owners and residents,” the memo stated.Adam Beacher, a Rumson resident who helps organize the event, said organizers asked the committee what could be done to change its mind. In response, Beacher said last week, organizers acknowledged their route was quite similar to the Sheehan run and worked with McCarthy to determine a route that would be less disruptive. “We changed the course completely,” Beacher said last Thursday.This new plan doesn’t’ require the complete closing of any of the streets along the route and runners would wind up at Red Bank Regional High School, Little Silver, using that as part of the course, according to Beacher.“It works out really well for us,” Beacher said, as the route would be safer this way.“We do have to have concerns over how it impacts the business district as well as the residential areas,” McCarthy explained. But now with the changed routes and other stipulations, “They conditionally satisfied all of our requirements,” McCarthy added.Little Silver police this week have signed off on the event and organizers now have to submit the appropriate paperwork, for such things as proof of insurance, to move forward, Beacher said.The run is slated for April 21 and Beacher said organizers hope to have up to 500 runners participating. Last year’s event had about 315, and 40 volunteers. It raised approximately $18,000 that went to such organizations as Aslan Youth Ministries, here in Red Bank, and Anita’s Children, doing humanitarian work in Haiti, according to Beacher.last_img read more

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Doctors’ Prescription: A Dose of Music for Charity

first_imgBy Mary Ann BourbeauRED BANK – It’s common for kids to take music lessons and dream of becoming a rock star. Then reality sets in and most of those kids become adults with so-called “real jobs.” Most abandon their instruments because of time and family constraints. But some continue to play and sharpen their skills.That is the case with Dr. Lawrence Sykoff, Ed.D., the former headmaster at the Ranney School in Tinton Falls. When he was young, Sykoff used to practice his guitar every day after school, before he did his homework.“I used to follow The Beatles, Bob Dylan and other artists of the time,” he said. “I thought I was going to grow up and become a great folk singer.”Instead, Sykoff earned a doctorate in education and spent 20 years at Ranney before retiring in 2013 to start a management consultant practice. But he never gave up the guitar, and even sat in at times with Ranney’s jazz band.“It’s great for a school leader to be musical,” said the Freehold resident. “We developed an outstanding performing arts program. We even brought the school orchestra and chorus to perform at Carnegie Hall. I love music, but I never had that kind of opportunity. These kids were so inspired by being there. It was something they will remember forever.”Sykoff found his own opportunity about five years ago during a Ranney School trip to Paris, where he met a parent chaperone named David Lessing. He discovered that Lessing, an orthopedic surgeon, was a bass player. The men realized they had a friend in common, dermatologist Kenneth Grossman, who played drums.“We decided to get together and jam,” Sykoff said. “It was great fun.”This went on for about a year. One day, interventional pain management specialist Scott Woska sat in on keyboards, and that was the tipping point.“He was a professionally trained musician and he was excellent,” Sykoff said. “He had even written a symphony. With his guidance and direction, we really had the makings of a band.”They brought in a friend, vocalist Erin Patrick, and named themselves the Docs of Rock. When veterinarian Kristin Scott joined in on vocals, they realized they had all the components they needed. Their first gig was at a friend’s house, and not only did they get a huge turnout, but they gained enough confidence to book a show at The Downtown in Red Bank. Inspired by the charitable works of Tim McLoone and his Holiday Express band, they decided the proceeds would be given to a local organizations that help the needy.“From the very beginning, we have approached our music with a benevolent spirit,” Sykoff said. “Our primary objective is to give back to the community, and to have fun while we’re doing it.”Brian Incremona, M.D., an internist, is the latest doc to join the band, which plays a variety of music including the Four Seasons, Taylor Swift, Bon Jovi, One Republic and a Motown medley.“There’s something for everyone,” Sykoff said. “We want to get people out on the dance floor.”To date, the Docs of Rock have raised more than $50,000 for area charities such as Lunch Break and the Parker Family Health Center.“I feel like we’re making a difference,” Sykoff said. “There are a lot of charities with limited budgets and they need as much help as they can get. If we can combine our passion for music and help the community at the same time, it’s a win-win. I feel like my dream has been fulfilled because I’m a musician and I’m also helping others.”The Docs of Rock will play a benefit performance at 7 p.m. Sunday, April 24 at The Downtown in Red Bank to raise money for Family & Children’s Service (FCS), the oldest nonprofit social service agency in Monmouth County. Vocalist Nicole Cocco will join in for this performance.“I used to be on the Board of Trustees (at FCS) and I got a close look at the services they provide, particularly in counseling families and isolated seniors,” Sykoff said. “It’s an organization that has a broad reach. They help people of all ages. I really admire the work they do.”In its 106-year history, FCS has provided support to multiple at-risk populations, including Adult Protective Services, Statewide Respite Care, Home Care Services and Homecare Grant Assistance.“FCS has been around for more than a century, but some people may not be aware of the types of programs and services we offer,” said FCS Board Member Debbie O’Donoghue. “This is a great way for people to get to know us in a relaxed and friendly atmosphere. We invite the community to join us for what promises to be a fun and entertaining night.”Funds raised at this performance will benefit Operation Sleighbells, FCS’s holiday gift-giving program, which last year served more than 1,600 area children and their families.A $20 donation is suggested at the door. The evening will also include a 50/50 raffle and a live auction. For more information, call Diane Gribbon at 732-222-9111 ext. 134 or visit www.fcsmonmouth.org.Arts and entertainment writer Mary Ann Bourbeau can be reached at [email protected] and on Twitter @MaryAnnBourbeau.last_img read more

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Mallard’s Team of the Week — LVR Bombers Junior Basketball Team

first_imgThe L.V. Rogers Bombers outscored Selkirk Storm of Kimberley 6-0 in overtime to capture a 48-42 victory in the final of the David Thompson Lakers Junior Girl’s Basketball Tournament Saturday in Invermere.Bryce Winters sank one of two free throws to force overtime before the Bombers took over to secure the first place trophy with a 3-0 record. The Bombers, down 41-42 with 8 seconds left in the game, ran an endline play to set up Winters with a shot.Winters was fouled and sank one of two from the charity stripe to force the extra period.LVR opened play by stopping Laurie Tigers of Cranbrook 21-19.The Bombers then outlasted host David Thompson Lakers 39-38.Mallard’s Source for Sports would like to salute the strides made by the LVR Junior Bombers by selected the squad Team of the Week.The team includes, coaches Chris Dergousoff and Willis Parnell, Julia Burkart, Marla Motzkus, Heather Potkins, Bryce Winters, Ohia Wintrub, Riley Zondervan, Sierra Jones, Sonja Boyd and Camryn Parnell.last_img read more

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Treaty Talks Critique

first_imgThe Fraser Institute says native treaty talks in B.C. have now cost more than a billion dollars over 15 years. It adds they’ve produced only 8 treaties in various stages of completion in that time.A new institute report concludes the treaty process is deeply flawed and pits Canadians against Canadians. The right-wing think tank also says governments are endorsing positions which discriminate against non-aboriginals, giving First Nations preferential tax treatment.Study author Mark Milke says aboriginal governments should be given the same taxing powers as other municipalities. He also argues treaties should settle all issues and governments need be more open about their negotiating positions.- Advertisement –last_img

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