Waste reduction on the menu for food businesses

first_img Previous articleSeoda Shows partyNext articleLimerick study gives a choice to kidney patients Alan Jacqueshttp://www.limerickpost.ie Nichola Grufferty of Ballyhoura Development presenting a certificate of participation toThe Yarn CafŽ at the Carebright centre in Bruff.SAVOUR Food, a food waste reduction programme for businesses, has been working with those in the food sector in the Ballyhoura region over the past year.The programme provides free support including consultancy, food waste prevention training and advice on legal obligations in relation to food waste management.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up The Savour Food programme is funded by the Department of Agriculture, Food and Marine. The programme is managed by the Clean Technology Centre, and supported by regional development companies SECAD, and Ballyhoura Development CLG.The programme recently recognised 43 businesses for their participation in the programme. The range of participating businesses includes: hotels, restaurants, cafés, food retailers such as SuperValu and Spar, care centres and food processors.Better planning, food waste segregation, waste auditing and waste cost analysis were key elements of the programme.For the foodservice sector, accurate portion control is a key part of reducing waste and reducing costs. However, there will be times when the customer will not eat all that’s on their plate. Savour Food provided participants with compostable take-away food boxes for consumers who would like to bring their leftovers home with them.“Wasted food is a wasted resource and has implications for the environment and climate change. Savour Food will be expanding its reach to other counties in Munster and will launch an online tool to help business tackle food waste in 2020,” said James Hogan of the Clean Technology Centre. Advertisement WhatsApp BusinessNewsWaste reduction on the menu for food businessesBy Alan Jacques – February 15, 2020 249 Twittercenter_img Print Email Facebook Linkedinlast_img read more

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Sisters allegedly killed elderly dad in ‘perfect murder’ plot then covered it up for years: Sheriff

first_imgPinellas County Sheriffs Office(PALM HARBOR, Fla.) — Two sisters are accused of killing their 85-year-old father in a chilling, premeditated plot that was uncovered four years later, thanks to a man, who had a sexual relationship with both sisters and came forward, authorities said.Linda Roberts, 61, and Mary-Beth Tomaselli, 63, were arrested and charged with first-degree murder for the 2015 death of their father, Anthony Tomaselli, the Pinellas County Sheriff’s Office said in a statement on Tuesday.“This is in some respects — as we sometimes call these things — it’s the perfect murder, because there was absolutely no sign of struggle, no sign of foul play,” Pinellas County Sheriff Bob Gualtieri told reporters Tuesday. “He had cancer, he had dementia, he was seriously ill … They could have easily gotten away with it.”The alleged crime took place on March 6, 2015, when the sisters were at their father’s Palm Harbor, Fla., home. The sisters called 911 for help and paramedics rushed to the scene and tried to do CPR on Anthony Tomaselli, but he was declared dead, according to the sheriff’s office.At the time “there did not appear to be any foul play or criminal activity,” the sheriff’s office said.Anthony Tomaselli had an “extensive medical history and when contact was made with his primary care physician, he agreed to sign the death certificate,” the sheriff’s office said. “The physician listed the cause of death as natural due to Tomaselli’s advanced age and medical history.”But this year, on Feb. 13, a man, who had a sexual relationship with both sisters, contacted authorities to say he had a recording of Linda Roberts confessing, Gualtieri said.The man then helped authorities obtain recordings from both women about the crime, Gualtieri said.The women allegedly said on the recordings that they first plotted to kill their father with alcohol and sleeping pills, but that didn’t work, and they allegedly tried to suffocate him with a pillow, according to the sheriff’s office.“When that did not work, they stuffed a rag down his throat, pinched his nose, and held his arms down until he stopped breathing and died,” according to the sheriff’s office.Mary-Beth Tomaselli allegedly said her adult daughter was at the home at the time so she gave her sleeping pills so she wouldn’t see what happened to her grandfather, authorities said.The sisters allegedly said they “faked” finding their father dead and staged giving him CPR and calling 911 for help, authorities said.The sisters allegedly said “they ‘euthanized’ their father” in a “premeditated” killing “because he was going to die within a couple months and would not live in an Assisted Living Facility,” the sheriff’s office said.After Anthony Tomaselli’s death, his daughters sold his home and split the money with their brother, who was not involved in the alleged crime, authorities said.The sisters admitted to the allegations when they were arrested Tuesday — a day before their father’s death anniversary, according to the sheriff.The sheriff praised the man, who allegedly recorded the sisters, for coming forward.Roberts and Tomaselli are expected to get arraigned for the charges on Wednesday.Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Setting up House

first_imgSome might argue that the role of House master, which involves managing the social, living, and curricular lives of hundreds of students while teaching and conducting research as a faculty member, is one of the most demanding on campus. Now, imagine taking on the responsibilities of master with a new baby.Ronald S. Sullivan and Stephanie Robinson began their stint as masters at John Winthrop House in September, 18 days after the birth of their second son, Chase Barrington. Son number one, Trey, was 8. And then there was their 11-year-old pug. “It is a tough juggling act,” Robinson said. “Not the master’s role itself, but having a new baby, which means little sleep for mom, along with the responsibilities that come with the job.”“We never do anything the easy way,” Robinson said. “We put a lot into the hopper, and then figure out how to make it work.” And so they did. They hosted social events, including sophomore dessert parties to welcome students, tea parties for juniors, and senior wine tastings to educate students about wines and encourage them to drink responsibly. They hosted actor Blair Underwood and participated in several of his artist-in-residence activities. They also had open house parties for nonresident tutors.“Having a good sense of community is really important to us. We wanted very much to be present, and to have our presence felt. So, we did a lot in the beginning that will surely pay off later.”Sullivan and Robinson also made history when they were appointed the first African-American House masters at Harvard.“There is obvious symbolic significance that Harvard has appointed the first African-American masters,” Sullivan said. “There is symbolic significance: that we will sign diplomas. Our appointment is testament to the growth of the University and American culture, in general, that a significant, important position is no longer occupied primarily by people of a single race or ethnic background.” He added, “But, we don’t master any differently. There is no black method of mastering. We are honored to serve in this capacity.”“The experience of being African-American in the United States brings a different sensibility, brings a different rich heritage that is value-added. It is important to bring who you are, and authenticity to the role. It enriches the community of masters, students, faculty, and staff. We are happy to be a part of history. Hopefully, there will be many more,” said Robinson.Sullivan, a 1989 Morehouse College and 1994 Harvard Law School (HLS) graduate, is clinical professor of law, director of the Harvard Criminal Justice Institute, and Edward R. Johnston Lecturer on Law. He joined the HLS faculty in 2007 from Yale University Law School, where he was associate clinical professor and founding director of the Yale Criminal Justice Clinic. But he is no stranger to Harvard House life. He was a nonresident tutor at Kirkland House, and later, a resident tutor at Leverett House while in law school.Also an HLS graduate, Robinson holds a B.S. from the University of Maryland. She is a lecturer on law at HLS, is president and CEO of the Jamestown Project, and is a political commentator for the Tom Joyner Morning Show. She also served as the chief counsel for Sen. Edward Kennedy.The “how did you two meet” story could have been written by Noel Coward. They were HLS students and met when they took husband and wife roles in an HLS Drama Society play. “Acting was fun,” Robinson said. “Hill Harper [star of the CBS drama “CSI: New York”] was also in the play with us.”“We remain in the process of developing a vision” for their new roles as masters, Sullivan said. “We did not want to make wholesale changes in the traditions of Winthrop House. Nor do we want to be unduly captive by the House traditions. We want to retain what is working well, and augment that with our personalities.”Sullivan and Robinson want to create a more robust Senior Common Room. They plan to host special masters’ teas with guests from around the world. As former actors, they want to bring more arts activities to the House. And, they want more and better sports activities.“Most importantly,” Sullivan said, “we want to continue to work on scholarship. That’s what this is all about. We want to celebrate the scholar. We have already had special celebrations for those who have received recognition for scholastic achievement, such as the John Harvard Scholars. We want to place emphasis on our students’ being well-rounded individuals. Diversity of interests is very important to us.”Robert Mitchell is assistant dean for diversity relations and communications in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences.last_img read more

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Palm pounces for Trial victory

first_imgAnother Palm landed a thrilling victory in an extraordinary finish to the thetote.com Galway Plate Trial Handicap Chase at Limerick. Press Association Power said: “He toughed it out and he stayed well. The mistakes by the other horses at the second-last and last gave him heart. Once I got to the girth of the horse in front I knew he would get there. He battled well.” Whats Happening kept his unbeaten record over fences by winning for the second time over the bigger obstacles in the day’s richest race, the Limerick GAA Supporters Chase, though Michael Hourigan’s charge was made to pull out all the stops. Original Option was travelling best coming down the straight, but he could not shake off the 13-8 favourite, who responded well to Barry Geraghty’s driving to forge ahead and score by a length. The trainer said: “The ground was probably on the quick side for him, things were happening a bit fast. We might wait for slow ground now, but Killarney and Galway are possibilities. He has done everything right, he won a bumper, maiden hurdle and now two chases.” Alan Crowe got a good tune out of The Lady Granuaile in the limerickraces.ie Mares Beginners Chase and Pauline Gavin’s eight-year-old (20-1) jumped the last two fences stylishly to outpoint Sox’s Girl by three lengths. Gavin said: “She likes that ground and we’ll look for something at Galway with her next.” center_img Supreme Doc got the better of Our Girl Lucy coming down the straight and looked to have the prize sewn up when he went about four lengths clear on the run-in, but he began to slow alarmingly and the pack came charging at him. Both Another Palm and Our Girl Lucy swept past in the shadow of the post, and the photo showed that Noel Meade’s grey (20-1) had got there by a nose under Robbie Power, with Supreme Doc a further half a length away in third. last_img read more

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