Indian cartoonist could be jailed for cartoons about India’s supreme court

first_img Follow the news on India India is ranked 142nd out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2020 World Press Freedom Index. to go further RSF demands release of detained Indian journalist Siddique Kappan, hospitalised with Covid-19 The supreme court gave the go-ahead on 18 December for contempt of court proceedings against Rachita Taneja in connection with three cartoons on her @SanitaryPanels Twitter page, where she has been commenting on Indian politics for the past six years. RSF_en “We call on the supreme court’s judges to drop the absurd charges they have allowed to be brought against Rachita Taneja, who just exercised her right to freedom of expression as guaranteed by article 19 of the 1950 constitution,” said Daniel Bastard, the head of RSF’s Asia-Pacific desk. “It is very shocking to see India’s highest court stoop to harassing a cartoonist on the pretext of a spurious contempt of court case when the cartoons were completely inoffensive.” Innocuous March 3, 2021 Find out more April 27, 2021 Find out more IndiaAsia – Pacific Condemning abusesOnline freedoms InternetFreedom of expressionJudicial harassment News Help by sharing this information Contempt of court proceedings are increasingly used to silence journalists and commentators who refer critically to the judicial system. Those targeted have included the political commentator and comedian Kunal Kamra, who was accused of contempt in December over a series of satirical tweets about the supreme court. Posted on 7 August, 11 November and 12 November respectively, the three cartoons are very innocuous. The first parodies an exchange of favours between a judge and Prime Minister Narendra Modi. The second shows the flag of Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh – the Hindu nationalist militia of which the BJP is a political offshoot – ­flying over the supreme court building. And the third refers to a supreme court decision concerning a journalist with the pro-BJP Republic TV channel. Taneja has been asked to submit a written defence which the court will examine on 29 January. If found guilty, she could be sentenced to up to six months in prison.center_img IndiaAsia – Pacific Condemning abusesOnline freedoms InternetFreedom of expressionJudicial harassment As RSF reported at the time, Shillong Times newspaper editor Patricia Mukhim and publisher Shobha Chaudhuri were each fined 200,000 rupees (2,600 euros) in March 2019 for contempt of court because of an article drawing attention to a court directive on benefits for retired judges in Meghalaya, the northeastern state where they are based. Organisation Receive email alerts News June 10, 2021 Find out more In rural India, journalists face choice between covering pandemic and survival News The proceedings are the result of a complaint filed by Aditya Kashyap, a member of the ruling Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP)’s student wing, claiming that Taneja had “shaken the public trust and confidence in the judicial system of our constitutional democracy by directly attacking and making insinuations against the Supreme Court of India.” News January 11, 2021 Indian cartoonist could be jailed for cartoons about India’s supreme court Following last month’s Indian supreme court decision to authorize a “contempt” case against a New Delhi-based cartoonist over a series of cartoons satirising the court, Reporters Without Borders (RSF) urges the judges in charge of the case to respect the right to free speech as proclaimed in India’s constitution and to dismiss these absurd proceedings. India: RSF denounces “systemic repression” of Manipur’s media For three innocuous drawings, Rachita Taneja is accused of having “shaken the public trust and confidence in the judicial system of [India’s] constitutional democracy” (image : R. Tanija). last_img read more

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Happiest Place on Earth has good news

first_img Tags (Getty, iStock/Illustration by Alexis Manrodt for The Real Deal)It was a sad day last March when the Happiest Place on Earth had to close because of Covid.But Disneyland is now targeting a late April reopening, according to the Los Angeles Times. Disney Company executives announced the news at Tuesday’s shareholder meeting. Disneyland in Anaheim employs upwards of 10,000 people.The news coincided with California’s decision this week to loosen restrictions for theme park reopenings.Statewide, theme parks can open their doors as soon as April 1 — at 15 percent capacity — as long as they follow prescribed county coronavirus metrics.ADVERTISEMENTDisneyland is in Orange County, which along with L.A. County is in the most severe tier of the state’s four-tier pandemic tracking system — purple. Theme parks in those counties cannot open but data released Tuesday showed that Covid is slowing in both places. When those counties fall into the red tier, they would reach the threshold for reopening. That is expected to happen once the state has administered 2 million shots of the vaccines.Theme parks in counties that fall into the orange tier can allow 25 percent capacity, and those that reach the yellow tier can allow 35 percent.Representatives from Knott’s Berry Farm and Universal Studios Hollywood said they won’t announce a reopening date yet.The state’s latest rules scale back from previous orders that did not allow theme parks to reopen until their county reached the yellow tier.Disney’s Epcot theme park and Hollywood Studios in Orlando, Florida, reopened last July, after a mid-March closure.[LAT] — Dennis Lynch  CoronavirusdisneyDisneylandhospitality Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlink Share via Shortlinklast_img read more

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Dave Hakins named publisher of Vermont Life Magazine

first_imgPrior to Vermont Life, Hakins was the director of business development for The Essex Resort & Spa. He also served as executive director and COO of the Vermont Convention Bureau and director of sales and promotion for VDTM. Additionally, he managed group travel programs and marketing events as the founder, chairman and CEO of Hakins Meetings and Incentives, and served as vice president and director of corporate promotion for Chase Manhattan. For more information, visit vermontlife.com. Vermont Life 12.20.2011 Effective December 19, Hakins replaces Steve Cook, who has served as the magazine’s interim publisher since 2009. Cook will continue to serve as the deputy commissioner for the Vermont Department of Tourism and Marketing (VDTM). Miller praised Cook for taking on a second, full-time job as Vermont Life interim publisher for more than two years. ‘Steve has multitasked so skillfully and executed both jobs very well,’ Miller said. ‘He can now focus 100 percent of his attention on marketing and operations as deputy commissioner for VDTM.’ A resident of South Burlington, Hakins will maintain his role as director of the magazine’s advertising sales, partnerships and events, and continue to work closely with Vermont Life’s editor, Mary Hegarty Nowlan. ‘Dave Hakins and Mary Hegarty Nowlan have demonstrated a successful team approach to the magazine’s growth and success,’ Miller added. ‘The 65-year-old magazine was redesigned in the past year, which has also helped attract a younger demographic of subscribers and contributed to an increase in advertising sales.’center_img The Agency of Commerce and Community Development today announced that Dave Hakins has been named Publisher of Vermont Life magazine. Hakins, who joined the magazine last spring as an advertising contractor, helped boost sales revenues in 2011 and oversaw several initiatives to increase the magazine’s visibility. He launched the new ‘Dine, Shop, Stay & Play’ advertorial sections for local communities, including Waterbury and Addison County, and developed the Vermont Life Emporium, a special section intended to make advertising affordable for Vermont entrepreneurs selling art, crafts, gifts, specialty foods and other Vermont-inspired products. Hakins is also credited with the magazine’s increase in full-page advertising displays from some of Vermont’s largest companies, such as Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, People’s United Bank, Long Trail Brewing and Hannaford. ‘Dave Hakins is a natural fit as the publisher of Vermont Life magazine,’ said Lawrence Miller, Vermont’s secretary of Commerce and Community Development. ‘What the magazine needs now more than ever is someone with a strong foundation in marketing and media who also possesses an entrepreneurial spirit to uncover new revenue streams for the magazine. Dave has an extensive background in publishing, marketing, sales and management, as well as experience in the tourism sector of Vermont.’last_img read more

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