Millions of suburban residents in US lack health insurance

first_imgNearly 40 percent of the uninsured population in America lives in the suburbs and nearly one in seven suburban residents lacks health insurance.Despite the suburbs’ general reputation of affluence, the U.S.’ growing poor population in suburban areas faces substantial barriers to accessing health care—similar to those faced by the urban and rural poor—according to the study.It is the first national analysis comparing health care coverage and access between people living in the suburbs and people in urban and rural areas.The study appears in the October 2017 issue of Health Affairs.“We rarely think about suburbs when we think about vulnerable populations. Increasing rates of suburban poverty haven’t gotten much attention from the public health sector, and policymakers really haven’t started to consider what these shifts in the geography of poverty mean for health care access and for health disparities,” said lead author Alina Schnake-Mahl, a doctoral student at Harvard Chan School.Poverty has been on the rise in suburbia for a number of reasons: job losses and loss of wealth during and after the 2008 recession; a “return to the city” trend among millennials and empty nesters and subsequent pricing out of lower-income families; more affordable suburban housing options; and international immigration to suburban communities.To explore more about how these shifts are impacting health insurance rates and health care access, the researchers analyzed data from 2005–15 from roughly 2.7 million adults interviewed as part of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Behavior Risk Factor Surveillance System, an annual national telephone survey.The findings showed that:The suburbs were home to 44 percent of the overall population and 38 percent of the uninsured population, and the uninsurance rate among suburbanites was 15 percent.The probability of having no usual source of health care in the suburbs was 19 percent, and for having no routine annual check up, 34 percent.Among low-income suburbanites, 36 percent had an unmet health care need due to cost and 42 percent had not had a recent checkup.All poor adults — whether they lived in cities, rural areas, or the suburbs — had 8 times higher odds of being uninsured and 1.7 times higher odds of no recent checkup compared to higher-income adults.Uninsurance rates did decline in the suburbs after implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) in 2014 — as they did in all geographic regions — but suburban coverage gains appear to have been more limited than in urban and rural areas….Speculating as to why poor suburbanites face barriers to health care coverage and access, the researchers pointed out challenges unique to the suburbs: the relative lack of community health centers and free clinics; safety net hospitals that are far from home with limited public transportation options; providers that may be reluctant to treat uninsured patients; and limited availability of services such as mental health and substance abuse treatment.Senior author of the study was Benjamin Sommers, associate professor of health policy and economics at Harvard Chan School and associate professor of medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. Read Full Storylast_img read more

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COVID case identified at St. John the Evangelist Elementary

first_imgThe district says they will also notify the St. John Evangelist community with any interruptions to the schools calendar schedule. The districts says they have quarantined one class and several teachers impacted. BINGHAMTON (WBNG) — The Catholic Schools of Broome county says they were notified of a confirmed COVID case at St. John the Evangelist Elementary School. The Catholic Schools of Broome County will be working with health officials to monitor the virus and determine if additional actions should be taken. center_img The district says parents, faculty and staff will be notified immediately with any further decided upon actions. The district says they are working with the health department on proper procedures for all faculty, staff, and students regarding the next steps in quarantining and testing for the virus. last_img read more

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The $35 million house that Skase built

first_imgThe luxury Brisbane mansion built by disgraced Australian businessman Christopher Skase has hit the market.‘Bromley’ was built by Skase and wife Pixie in 1988 for $35 million and is so vast that it spreads over nine titles.Featuring nine bedrooms, nine bathrooms and eight car spaces, the sprawling property was lived in by the high-flying couple for only a year.The sprawling property has vast living areas. Picture: Murray and Associates Estate AgentsSkase was a prominent business tycoon during the 1980s, before fleeing for Majorca, where he died of stomach cancer in 2001.‘Bromley’, at 36 Dickson Terrace, Hamilton, is an opulent palace, within 10 minutes of the Brisbane CBD.Since construction, the home was renovated in 1997 at a cost of $5 million, while the current owners have spent a further $4 million on refurbishments.Christopher Skase in Majorca in 1998. Picture: Getty ImagesThe home’s lavish European-style design includes an internal bell tower, rare and exotic granite and imported Italian marble.Selling agent Andrew Murray of Murray & Associates Estates Agents says the home is truly unique, with features like secret passageways and bulletproof doors.‘Bromley’ has been furnished in opulent Europoean style. Picture: Murray and Associates Estate AgentsMurray says he has already had interest in the property, including an interstate party who have inspected the house four times.More from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this home3 hours agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investor9 hours ago“It takes a couple of hours to get around it,” he says.“A family was looking at it over the weekend.”This grand mansion is set to break the Brisbane price record. Picture: Murray and Associates Estate Agents‘Bromley’ is for sale by Expressions of Interest closing Friday, November 25 at 5pm, if not sold prior.Murray says the home is expected to break the record for a Brisbane house price.last_img read more

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Are High School Sports Worth It?

first_imgRecently I had a conversation with someone who wondered if all the time spent in sports by our current high school students is really worth it.  As soon as school is out this spring, their summer workouts will begin.  The only week that is truly a summer vacation is one week in July designated by the IHSAA as a “no practice” week.  Besides the summer practices some of these young athletes play as many as 50 sporting events during their summer break.  Couple this with the fact that they may be multiple-sport athletes and this number goes up even more.When school starts, they might have 6 a.m. practices besides the afternoon practices or weight lifting.  This person wondered when they ever had time to study.  This is certainly food for thought since many of these youngsters are college prep students.  They also may be without a driver’s license which means a parent or someone has to get them to and from practice.On the other side, they learn to work together and most of them have a lot of fun.  Working together is certainly necessary later in life, they learn to manage their time, and they find a way to overcome the agony of defeat.  Now you have points to argue for or against.last_img read more

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Turner funeral draws crowd

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWhicker: Clemson demonstrates that it’s tough to knock out the champRichard said that “Rocket 88,” Turner’s breakthrough rock ‘n’ roll hit, “shook my soul.” “I took that same introduction and made `Good Golly, Miss Molly,”‘ he said. “I took that same thing and made a huge hit.” Turner was responsible for a string of successful songs throughout his career, including 1959’s “A Fool in Love” and 1970’s “Take You Higher,” but his musical legacy was forever tarnished by his image as the drug-addicted, brutally abusive former husband of Tina Turner, who did not attend Friday’s funeral. When Ike Turner died, a spokeswoman for Tina said she hadn’t had contact with him in 35 years and would not comment. Ike Turner knew that his personal problems threatened to overshadow his musical accomplishments, said Rob Johnson, producer of Turner’s Grammy-winning 2001 album “Here and Now.” “He understood, as a very sensitive artist, the challenge that would be involved in stepping up and moving forward and reinitiating the contribution of his genius, of his music, and giving that gift that God gave him back to society,” he said. “How much courage that took for him. It could have been real simple to sit under a rock and let life go by, but he didn’t accept that.” Ike Turner’s funeral was part memorial service, part rock concert. The nearly three-hour remembrance Friday at Greater Bethany Community Church City of Refuge east of Gardena featured Turner’s eight-piece band, the Kings of Rhythm, which performed rollicking renditions of some of the musician’s greatest hits, including “Nutbush City Limits” and “Proud Mary.” The songs brought the crowd of hundreds to its feet. “Daddy wouldn’t want any of us crying,” said Turner’s daughter, Mia Turner. “He would want us to throw a party.” Among those eulogizing Turner, who died Dec. 13 at age 76, were music producer Phil Spector and rock ‘n’ roll pioneer Little Richard, who described his friend as “one of the greatest musicians I have ever met in my life.” Many speakers alluded to Turner’s personal woes, though none directly addressed his history of drug and domestic abuse. “Stop holding this mess – whatever it is – against this man. Even Jesus forgives,” said Richard, 75, who left the service early, aided by a walker and several assistants. Spector, who produced Turner’s hit “River Deep, Mountain High,” said, “There was only one Ike, and I learned more from Ike than any professors I know.” He went on to say that Turner was “demonized and vilified” by his ex-wife. He called the 1993 film “What’s Love Got To Do With It,” based on Tina Turner’s autobiography, a “piece-of-trash movie,” inspiring applause from some mourners. “Ike made Tina the jewel she was,” said Spector, who stood trial for murder earlier this year for the shooting death of actress Lana Clarkson. A judge declared a mistrial in September after jurors failed to reach a verdict. Spector also accused Oprah Winfrey and Whoopi Goldberg of “demonizing” Turner on their talk shows. Of Turner’s 17 months in jail for a drug conviction in 1989, Spector said, “He was sent to prison for no other reason than he was a black man in America.” Each speech was punctuated with performances by Turner’s band, the crowd rising to its feet again and again to sing and dance along. Concert promoter Charlie Dutton, Turner’s friend and colleague for 40 years, called him “the most talented musical person to ever live on Earth.” “He doesn’t get his just dues for what he really did,” said Dutton, including among those contributions being “the first man to put sexuality in music with the Ikettes.” The service began with a photo montage from throughout Turner’s life set to his song “Jesus Loves Me,” which features the refrain “I’m a bad boy, but Jesus loves me anyway.” The service concluded with scores of mourners gathering near Turner’s casket, which sat beneath a guitar-shaped wreath made of white flowers. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img
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