Detailed guide: Quality and safety of human organs, tissues and cells from 1 January 2021

first_img an import certificate authorising imports from the third country supplier if multiple imports are to be undertaken, an import agreement with the third country supplier Quality and safety standards for organs, tissues and cellsYou should work to the same quality and safety standards as before 1 January 2021. The government made legislation to ensure the United Kingdom (UK) retained the same quality and safety standards after the end of the Brexit transition period on 31 December 2020.For further information on the quality and safety standards you should ask the Human Tissue Authority (HTA) or the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA).Sending and receiving non-reproductive tissues and cells for human use if you are a tissue establishment in Great BritainYou should treat suppliers outside the UK as third country suppliers. This means if you import or export non-reproductive tissues or cells from or to a country outside the UK, you will need: an import or export licence for import, an import agreement with the third country supplier For import from and export to suppliers in the European Economic Area (EEA) you have until 1 July 2021 to put these measures in place.You should treat the movement of non-reproductive tissues and cells from suppliers in Northern Ireland the same as the movement of non-reproductive tissues and cells from suppliers in Great Britain.If you require further information, visit the HTA website for detailed guidance on import and export arrangements. You can also contact them directly for advice.Sending and receiving non-reproductive tissues and cells for human use if you are a tissue establishment in Northern IrelandYou should treat suppliers in Great Britain in accordance with the relevant European Union (EU) regulations on non-EU suppliers. This means if you receive non-reproductive tissues or cells from Great Britain, you will need: an import licence an import agreement with the supplier in Great Britain In line with the UK government’s commitment to unfettered access, there are no additional requirements to send non-reproductive tissues or cells to Great Britain.There are no additional requirements to send or receive tissues or cells to or from the EEA.If you require further information, visit the HTA website for detailed guidance on import and export arrangements. You can also contact them directly for advice.Sending and receiving reproductive tissues and cells for human use if you are a centre in Great Britain licenced by the HFEAYou should treat suppliers outside the UK as third country suppliers. This means if you import reproductive tissues or cells from a country outside the UK, you will need: For import from suppliers in the EEA you have until 1 July 2021 to put these measures in place.You should treat the movement of non-reproductive tissues and cells from Northern Ireland the same as the movement of non-reproductive tissues and cells from Great Britain.If you require further information, you should ask the HFEA for detailed guidance on the requirements you need to meet.Sending and receiving reproductive tissues and cells for human use if you are a centre in Northern Ireland licenced by the HFEAYou should treat suppliers in Great Britain in accordance with the relevant EU regulations on non-EU suppliers. This means if you receive reproductive tissues or cells from a supplier in Great Britain, you will need: an import certificate authorising imports from the third country supplier if multiple imports are to be undertaken, an import agreement with the third country supplier In line with the UK government’s commitment to unfettered access, there are no additional requirements to send reproductive tissues or cells to Great Britain.If you require further information, you should ask the HFEA for detailed guidance on the requirements you need to meet.Ensuring traceability of all tissues and cellsIf you are a tissue establishment or fertility clinic in Great Britain, you must continue to ensure the traceability of tissues and cells (including reproductive cells). You no longer need to use the Single European Code, unless you wish to do so. You can use the traceability systems you had in place before the introduction of the Single European Code.If you are a tissue establishment or fertility clinic in Northern Ireland, you must continue to use the Single European Code.last_img read more

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UK COVID-19 death toll rises to nearly 50,000, Reuters tally shows

first_imgTopics : Johnson’s government says that while it may have made some mistakes it is grappling with the biggest public health crisis since the 1918 influenza outbreak and that it has ensured the health service was not overwhelmed.Still, the grim death toll surpasses even some projections by the government’s own scientific advisers.In March, Britain’s chief scientific adviser said keeping deaths below 20,000 would be a “good outcome”. In April, Reuters reported the government’s worst-case scenario was 50,000 deaths.Unlike the daily death toll published by the government, Tuesday’s death certificate figures include suspected cases and confirmed cases of COVID-19, the respiratory disease caused by the novel coronavirus.Epidemiologists say excess mortality – deaths from all causes that exceed the five-year average for the time of year – is the best way of gauging deaths from a disease outbreak because it is internationally comparable.Some 62,000 more people than usual have died in the United Kingdom during this year’s coronavirus pandemic, according to the latest available data, an expert from the Office for National Statistics said on Tuesday. The United Kingdom’s COVID-19 death toll neared 50,000 on Tuesday, confirming its place as one of the worst hit countries in the world just as Prime Minister Boris Johnson tries to ease the stringent novel coronavirus outbreak.The toll now stands at 49,646, including death certificate data for England and Wales released on Tuesday up to May 22, previously published figures for Scotland and Northern Ireland, and recent hospital deaths in England.Such a large death toll has prompted criticism of Johnson, who opposition parties say was too slow to impose a lockdown, too slow to protect the elderly in nursing homes and too slow to build a test and trace system.last_img read more

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