IAAF stops Nigeria’s Oduduru from competing at Doha 2019, Okagbare too may be barred

first_imgRelatedPosts Tokyo 2020 Olympics: Okowa adopts Okagbare, Ese Brume, four others Oduduru joins the growing list of athletes Visa is supporting for Tokyo 2020 Dare promises to pay outstanding athletes allowances, AFN hails him                     Nigerian sprinter Divine Oduduru will no longer compete at the 2019 World Championships in Doha. Oduduru’s name was not included on the start list of the men’s 200m race scheduled for Sunday. The second fastest African man did not compete in the 100m race, though his name was added to the schedule and was expected to feature in Heat 5 on Friday. According to the International Association of Athletics Federations, any athlete who withdraws from an event after being confirmed in the final entry list will have to forfeit subsequent events. The Athletics Federation of Nigeria had in a tweet on Friday explained that the athlete had pulled out of 100m to concentrate on the 200m. The same rule could also apply in the case of Blessing Okagbare, who also pulled out of the 100m women’s heats on Saturday. The AFN also gave the same reason for her non-participation in the race. Meanwhile, the IAAF was yet to release on Saturday night the start list for the women’s 200m expected to begin on Monday. It is therefore difficult to ascertain Okagbare’s position at the moment. Emmanuel Arowolo, with a Personal Best of 20.37 and listed in Heat 5, will now be the country’s hopes in the men’s 200m. In the men’s 400m hurdles, Rilwan Alowonle could not scale through to the finals as he finished eighth with 52.01secs in Heat 3. Nigeria’s sole representative in the 100m men, Raymond Ekevwo, also did not qualify for the finals of the event, with a 10.20secs to finish fifth in Heat 1.Tags: Athletics Federation of NigeriaBlessing OkagbareDivine OduduruInternational Association of Athletics FederationsRilwan Alowonlelast_img read more

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Exhibit reflects empathy

first_imgOn Tuesday, USC World Vision ACT:S hosted an art exhibit and mattress vigil in the Ronald Tutor Center Grand Ballroom as part of Empathy Week, a weeklong campaign to raise awareness and advocacy against human trafficking.Expression · Students browse through the displayed art at USC World Vision ACT:S’ art exhibit. The event is a part of Empathy Week. – Min Haeng Cho | Daily TrojanThe event was sponsored by the Undergraduate Student Government, and USC student organizations involved in the event included the USC Korean Campus Ministries, the United Nations Children’s Fund at USC, Student Coalition Against Labor Exploitation, Student Coalition for Asian Pacific Empowerment and USC’s United House of Prayer.Volunteers from the organizations provided guided tours with a multimedia experience featuring film, photography and artifacts that served to connect students to the stories of real victims of child sex trafficking.Volunteer Brandon Little said that the exhibit was launched in order to allow students to feel empathy for those involved in human trafficking.“What we really want to strive for is that next level, which is empathy when you actually feel for someone, enter into their situation, and help find a solution,” Little said.During a presentation during the exhibit, volunteers Natalie Zamudio and Jasmine Kellison shared the tragic stories of young girls in Southeast Asia, Russia, Mexico and the United States. One table displayed the syphilis medication of a 13-year-old Mexican girl named Rita. Her vulnerability was exploited by pimps, who hooked Rita on drugs and forced her to turn to prostitution to satisfy her addiction. With the help of iEmpathize — an organization working to end child exploitation — and its supporters, however, she now lives in a recovery facility.“By sharing these stories, we hope people will move from apathy to empathizing,” Kellison said. “We want them to step into these people’s shoes and realize that they don’t have to just sit back and let this happen.”The exhibit also included a mattress vigil where participants could sit on a bed symbolizing places where children are exploited, and students were able to become advocates for the victims by taking their place on the bed. This exercise was free, but a $5 donation was suggested. one hundred percent of the proceeds went to the iEmpathize efforts in the United States and Mexico.Guido Hajenius, branch coordinator for the NGO iEmpathize Los Angeles, was enthusiastic about engaging the USC community and advocating for awareness.“The Empathy Exhibit is about empowering and giving students the tools to do more than just know about an issue,” Hajenius said. “We want them to share these stories and establish personal connections.”last_img read more

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