Trey Anastasio Debuts Acoustic “Lizards” In Second Night Of Solo Tour [Videos]

first_img[cover photo by @quarterroy via @treyanastasio] On the second night of Trey Anastasio’s solo acoustic tour, he played to the delight of his fans at the Troy Savings Bank Music Hall in Troy, NY. The show featured selections from across the Phish guitarist’s extensive catalogue, including rarities like “Strange Design,” “Mountains in the Mist,” “Lizards,” “Guelah Papyrus,” “The Inlaw Josie Wales,” and “Summer of ’89,” which was dedicated to Trey’s wife Sue. The set also included covers of David Bowie‘s “Rock n Roll Suicide” and Oysterhead‘s “Rubberneck Lions.” Several of the songs performed were played solo acoustic by Trey for the first time, including “Shade,” “Tide Turns,” “Rubberneck Lions,” “Lizards,” “Carini,” and “Rock n Roll Suicide.”Trey interacted with the crowd throughout the show, commenting on his song choice, telling stories about the songs’ histories, and bantering with the intimate audience. Thanks to YouTube user The Kamherst, you can see full videos from each song below:last_img read more

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Finding common ground

first_imgAs a first-year law student in 1970, Kathleen Cekanski-Farrand was one of 12 women out of 250 in her class, part of only the third coeducational graduate class in the Law School. Two years later, Cekanski-Farrand was mailing letters to welcome 119 women of the first female undergraduate class into her care in Badin Hall. In 1972, she was a third-year law student and the dorm’s first rector in beginning days of coeducation. “I thought some of the challenges that we had probably would be similar at the undergraduate level that we had at the Law School level,” Cekanski-Farrand said. “So I thought I could share some of those experiences and turn them into positives.” Cekanski-Farrand earned the job when she interviewed with then-vice president of student affairs Fr. Tom Blantz. Blantz, who stepped into that position in 1971, had been part of the administrators who determined the University would directly admit women to its undergraduate student body following failed discussions to merge Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s. “We wanted women on the campus because having an all-male school was maybe less attractive to some of the people out there who were coming from coed high schools,” Blantz said. “[Men and women] should study together so they could work together later on, and there should be places for young Catholic women to go to Catholic schools. … When the merger was called off, I think it was a logical expected step that we would admit undergraduate women ourselves. “It was pretty much around the Thanksgiving weekend [of 1971] that I got a call from the provost … that they had decided to admit about 325 women for next year, in the fall of 1972.” Approximately 125 freshmen women joined that incoming group of undergraduates, while 200 female students transferred to Notre Dame from Saint Mary’s and other schools, Blantz said. Blantz reviewed the dorms and decided to place the incoming women in Badin and Walsh Halls, and when Notre Dame admitted 500 more women the following year, he opened Breen-Phillips Hall and Farley Hall as well. “The first group of women, they had to put up with a lot,” Blantz said. “You had 300 women and 5,000 men roughly, so the odds, you are a minority. In the seminar, it’s quite probably you are the only woman in the class and that could be a little bit uncomfortable.” Some of the women were quiet in their courses at first upon entering these male-dominated classrooms, Blantz said. “I remember teaching a University seminar, a freshman seminar with 16 in the class, two women in the class and 14 fellas,” he said. “And the women rarely said anything but when they handed in their written papers, I could tell the two women were extremely bright. So it was just a question of trying to get them to open up and talk more. I think now you don’t have that problem at all.” As her residents became more comfortable with Notre Dame life, Cekanski-Farrand said she worked to build a “Badin Hall family.” “A family is what holds you together, is what keeps you together so that you feel comfortable sharing your concerns, both the good days and all the bad days too, and that they felt comfortable sharing if they had a problem in the classroom,” she said. “The more you share, the more you communicate, the better the adventure is going to be.” There were challenges to life in Badin Hall that first year, she said, from a cockroach problem to “panty raids” when male students would run through the hallways for women’s underwear. But Cekanski-Farrand worked to develop a dorm identity and support her resident by promoting a Badin Hall T-shirt and visiting classes to see for herself how her students were being treated. “We had to find some common ground,” she said. Even as that common ground became sturdier through the first months and years of coeducation, many graduates protested the initial decision to admit women to their alma mater. But Blantz said he saw this as a positive. “I remember giving a talk once [to alumni], and there was opposition to coeducation,” Blantz said. “One guy apologized, and I said, ‘No, no, I’m happy to hear this. If you guys were happy that we were going coed, then I think we wanted too long to do it. That you were happy and satisfied with your education and the way we gave it to you back then when it was an all-male school, now we simply have to demonstrate that we can do the same thing with men and women here. “‘But if you people were all happy that we were finally admitting women and changing, then we would have to think, boy, we should have done it 20 years ago and they weren’t happy here.’” Blantz returned to teaching in the fall of 1973 after two years in student affairs, and Cekanski-Farrand served as a rector in Breen-Phillips Hall before leaving Notre Dame and eventually beginning the first all-female law firm in Indiana. But she said Blantz and University President Emeritus Fr. Theodore Hesburgh remained by her side through those years as a rector and remain close friends today. Hesburgh himself only visited the dorm on a handful of occasions, Cekanski-Farrand said, but he did gift the women the first Badin Hall mascot – a small Snoopy statue that would represent the dorm for years. He judged a door-decorating competition at Christmastime, and Cekanski-Farrand said Hesburgh would often call her to make sure everything in the women’s hall was running smoothly. He shared her commitment, she said, to integrating women into the student body and bringing Notre Dame to the place it is today. “[Hesburgh] took the time to do that,” she said. “I couldn’t have asked for a more gracious individual who was wanting to make this a positive for the University. “Whatever it took to make it work, extra hours, we would do it.”last_img read more

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Employee engagement drives the bottom line

first_imgAccording to the Gallup organization, only 35% of U.S. managers are engaged in their jobs. This shocking statistic therefore infers that 65% are not engaged, or worse, actively disengaged. One of the primary roles of managers is to motivate and engage their employees, however a disengaged manager who doesn’t care about their job or organization has a direct effect on the engagement, or lack there of, of their employees. This cascade effect, as Gallup refers to it, has shown that managers who work for engaged leaders are 39% more likely to be engaged themselves, and their employees are 59% more likely to be engaged. How can employees add value to a company and drive profitability if they are disengaged? Even worse, disengaged employees have higher absenteeism, higher turnover, and dangerous amounts of presenteeism — defined as attending work while sick — all of which can create a huge negative financial impact on an organization. Gallup estimates that this lack of management engagement can cost U.S. organizations up to $398 billion annually.In his seminal article in the Harvard Business Review, “Putting the Service-Profit Chain to Work”, James Heskett and his colleagues support the argument that customers and front-line employees must be your top priorities if you want to increase market share and profitability. By citing cases from Xerox, Southwest Airlines and Sears, they point out that employee satisfaction, through loyalty, value creation, and customer satisfaction, ultimately drives profitability and growth. The basis for their argument is that internal organizational quality, how employees are treated, creates the employee satisfaction and loyalty that subsequently creates the increased profit margin. So how can an organization succeed with apathetic managers and employees? Ultimately, it can’t. Engaged managers and employees are vital to an organizations success.Zynep Ton, a professor at the Sloan School of Management at MIT, thinks she has found a way to engage employees and increase productivity and the bottom line. Ton professes that companies that treat their employees well, including higher wages, educational opportunities and a sense of purpose and empowerment, can be just as profitable, if not more so, than those companies that pay minimum wage and have little if any benefits or perks. One example of this “human centered operations strategy” as Ton calls it, is QuikTrip, an $11 billion company with 722 convenience stores in the mid-west. At QuikTrip, managers and employees enjoy significantly higher wages than their competitors, but more importantly they are highly trained, can solve problems autonomously, and make merchandising decisions on their own. These factors raise employee satisfaction and increase engagement. The higher cost for employees results in significantly lower costs elsewhere in the organization.As is for most organizational initiates, engagement is driven from the top. Leaders must create a culture that makes their employees feel valued, respected, and to most importantly trust them and the organization. This must start with an internal strategic communications plan that is part of an overall strategy to increase employee engagement. Gallup points out that the three most important things leaders can do to drive engagement are; clearly and consistently communicate where the organization has been and where its going; make learning and development a priority; and emphasize managers strengths – hire based on natural talents. To engage employees, as previously discussed, you must have engaged managers that can inspire and motivate their employees. Good management, similar to good leadership, is a critical success factor in organizational success.The bottom line to increasing the bottom line is therefore creating a culture of engagement through outstanding human resource practices and the creation of a work environment that motivates and inspires managers and employees. 314SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Stuart R. Levine Founded in 1996, Stuart Levine & Associates LLC is an international strategic planning and leadership development company with focus on adding member value by strengthening corporate culture.SL&A … Web: www.Stuartlevine.com Detailslast_img read more

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