It’s Homecoming float time in the heart of Cowtown

first_imgTwitter Tri Delta students join alumnae to benefit Cook Children’s Cristian Migliaresehttps://www.tcu360.com/author/cristian-migliarese/ ReddIt Linkedin The College of Science and Engineering Dean, Phil Hartman, retires after 40 consecutive years I am a Communications major and a Journalism minor. I am a reporter for TCU 360 and I am working on the Greeks beat Previous articleFort Worth Water Department welcomes new director, emphasizes efficient useNext articleGetting to know the Top 10 Mr. and Ms. TCU finalists Cristian Migliarese RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR TCU places second in the National Student Advertising Competition, the highest in school history Twitter Facebook Cristian Migliarese printMany TCU student organizations are joining together to possibly win a float award for the Homecoming Parade tonight at 6 p.m.The Homecoming Parade is an annual TCU tradition that welcomes alumni home and connects the Fort Worth community with TCU. This year’s parade theme is “TCU’s Texan heritage in the heart of Cowtown – Where the West Begins!”Each float is expected to represent this theme. Floats will be judged on construction quality, design, color, creativity, spirit and crowd reaction.Building a float is no simple task. There is a 2015 Parade Float Handbook dedicated to this sole purpose, and the best floats take planning, dedication, and hard work.“I’ll be buying supplies up until the Sunday before the parade then we build it all week and we should be done the Thursday before,” said James Reis, chairperson for Beta Theta Pi’s float. “It’s so incredible to see the final product and how hard everyone works makes it all worth it.”Whether it’s being part of the building process, riding on the float or walking alongside, everyone seems to catch part of the TCU spirit.“Seeing all the people come watch that live around Fort Worth really shows the spirit of TCU,” Reis said.“It’s cool because you get to see more of the community,” said Calvin Layman, Pi Kappa Phi Homecoming float chair. “You get to see all the parents that bring their kids out so that’s pretty neat. It makes you proud to be a TCU student.” Cristian Migliaresehttps://www.tcu360.com/author/cristian-migliarese/ Linkedin Cristian Migliaresehttps://www.tcu360.com/author/cristian-migliarese/ TCU students participate in LEAPS day of service Journey of Hope 2017 holds special meaning for TCU Pi Kappa Phi members TCU Frog Camps returning to more traditional look this summer Facebook ReddIt + posts Cristian Migliaresehttps://www.tcu360.com/author/cristian-migliarese/ Students walk alongside the float built by Beta Theta Pi, Chi Omega and Alpha Delta Pi in the 2014 Homecoming Parade. (Kelsey Ritchie/TCU) TCU’s Interfraternity Council continues Movember campaign with 6K Recovery Runlast_img read more

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Widening the net: spatio-temporal variability in the krill population structure across the Scotia Sea

first_imgResolving the spatial variability in the population structure of Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba) requires a synoptic sample, as in the design of the CCAMLR 2000 Survey. However, this approach is not appropriate for assessing temporal variability. The size of krill in the diet of Antarctic fur seals (Arctocephalus gazella) has been shown to provide a good representation of the temporal changes in the krill population structure from within their foraging area. At Cape Shirreff, South Shetland Islands, krill in nets had modal size classes of 46-48 mm and 52-54 mm in length and appeared to reflect the presence of larger krill offshore and smaller krill inshore; krill in the diet of fur seals contained both modes, indicating that the foraging area of fur seals integrated the spatial variability in the krill population. At Signy Island, South Orkney Islands, krill in nets and fur seal diets had a modal size class of 52 mm when sampled simultaneously; however, krill in the diet of seals showed a decline in size later in the season with an overall mode of 48 mm. At Bird Island, South Georgia, there was little overlap between net samples, with a modal size class of 30-40 mm, and fur seal diets, with distinct modes of 44 and 54 mm; and there was also much greater spatial variability in the size of krill in these net samples than in those from the other two locations. Extending the comparison of krill size in the diet of seals, to include spatially congruent net samples collected immediately prior to the CCAMLR 2000 Survey, showed almost complete overlap and indicated an even greater spatial variability in the krill population structure at South Georgia. Interactions between the oceanographic transport and enhanced growth rates of krill at South Georgia may combine to produce a higher degree of spatial variability in the krill population compared to other locations and this may limit the use of differences in krill length as an indicator of their provenance. This study underlines the importance of using data from multiple sources when considering large-scale krill population dynamics; information that is crucial to the effective management of the commercial exploitation of krill.last_img read more

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