Wetter Weather.

first_img“The rains could not have come on a more timely basis,” said John Beasley, a peanut agronomist with the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. “Those fields needed the rain as soon as possible. And hopefully, most of them got what they have needed.”Peanuts Bounce BackPeanut plants can generally handle early-season drought stress and bounce back if they get enough rain later in the season, he said.Georgia’s peanut crop is worth about $350 million annually.Though heavy at times, the recent rain has fallen mostly as scattered thunderstorms. That means some folks have gotten less than others or no rain at all.”There are still a few areas that have not gotten the rainfall they need,” Beasley said.But in the fifth straight year of drought, Georgia farmers will take any rain anywhere right now.The state’s peanut crop is now entering the part of the growing season when it needs the most water, Beasley said. It will need about two inches a week for the next six to eight weeks.”Rarely do we get that rainfall pattern,” Beasley said. “Irrigation is needed to make up the difference.”Good growing conditions last year benefitted this year, too. The peanut crop grown last year for seed was excellent, he said, giving this year’s crop a good head start.However, dry weather late this spring delayed planting into late May and early June. This early dry weather opened the gates to some insects and disease, causing crop damage in places, he said.It also looks as if the number of cases of tomato spotted wilt virus will be very heavy again this year, Beasley said. Georgia farmers have been battling TSWV for many years. It can cause severe crop loss.But many farmers have reduced potential damage of the virus by following the guidelines of the UGA TSWV Risk Index.”This year I would have to say the majority of the Georgia peanut belt is in good shape,” Beasley said.Comfortable CottonMuch like peanuts, Georgia’s cotton crop needed the recent rains, said to Steve Brown, a UGA cotton agronomist.”In many places the crop is in good shape,” Brown said. “But the showers have been scattered. And those areas that have missed altogether are reaching the point of desperation. Some are even past the point of desperation. In those places, the crop is essentially finished.”The cotton crop has reached the bloom stage of development. As is the case with peanuts, getting enough moisture becomes critical during this time.”Generally, prospects are good if we receive broad rain frequently in the coming weeks,” Brown said.Tiny early-season insects known as thrips were particularly tough this year. “But we’re past that now,” he said.An unusually high number of aphids have surprised some cotton farmers. Aphids can suck the life out of cotton plants. But there’s something out there now keeping the population in check, Brown said.”A biological control for aphids, a naturally occurring fungus, is beginning to knock aphid populations down,” he said. “We rarely spray for them. We routinely rely on this fungus to eliminate them.”July marks the beginning “of real insect problems” in cotton, he said. For the next six to seven weeks, farmers and cotton scouts will have to be vigilant.last_img read more

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Alli eager to take a penalty against Colombia

first_img0Shares0000England midfielder Dele Alli says the team are confident ahead of their World Cup last-16 match against Colombia © AFP / Paul ELLISSAINT PETERSBURG, Russian Federation, Jun 30 – Dele Alli will put his hand up for a penalty if England are taken to a shootout by Colombia in their World Cup last-16 match on Tuesday.England have lost six times out of seven on spot-kicks at major tournaments, with their coach Gareth Southgate guilty of missing against Germany at Euro 96. Southgate has had his players practising penalties since March, while also deploying video analysts and psychometric tests in an attempt to buck the trend.Alli says he wants to step up.“We’re confident and looking to change things,” he said at England’s training base in Repino on Saturday.“Everyone wants to step up and help the team if we can. If I’m on the pitch, I want to take one. I’ll ask to try and take one.”Alli is expected to return to the starting line-up against Colombia, having sustained a thigh strain in the opening game against Tunisia and sat out against both Panama and Belgium.He will be up against a familiar foe in Moscow, given his Tottenham teammate Davinson Sanchez plays for Colombia in central defence. Sanchez’s primary focus will be stopping Harry Kane.“Obviously I hope Harry comes out on top,” Alli said. “Davinson’s a great player, a great guy as well. It’s hard not to support him but, as players, there are no friendships on the pitch.“He’s a great player, but no player is perfect. We know how he plays, we know his strengths, and we’ll look to try and exploit his very few weaknesses.”England have been pitched against Colombia after a much-changed team lost to Belgium on Friday, meaning they surrendered top spot in Group G.Southgate has been criticised for conceding momentum ahead of the knockout stages, but Alli disagrees.“Firstly we have to make it clear the whole squad is the ‘A team’. We’re in this together,” Alli said.“The boys played well. The manager made a decision and we all back him. We didn’t lose any momentum. We’re all fighting and raring to go, and can’t wait for the next game.”If England overcome Colombia, they could benefit from a kinder draw in the quarter-finals, where Switzerland or Sweden would lie in wait.In the top half, they would have met Japan and, if victorious, Brazil or Mexico in the last eight.“That’s very dangerous (to think like that),” Alli said. “We have to approach every game as if we’re playing the best side in the world.“Colombia have great talent and are a dangerous side and we have to be switched on to them, nothing more.”John Stones trained on Saturday morning, easing fears the defender injured his calf against Belgium.The only absentees were Ruben Loftus-Cheek, who completed his own personal conditioning session, and Fabian Delph, who has flown home for the birth of his third child.0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more

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How Does the Emperor Penguin Dive So Deep?

first_imgUsing a small recorder mounted on an emperor penguin, researchers at Scripps Institute measured the bird diving as deep as 1,800 feet – six times the depth any human has survived unassisted.  This is much deeper than scientists had expected.  Live Science surmises that if we could figure out how they do it without getting the bends, it could “improve anesthesia techniques and aide in research of how to avoid tissue damage when the body is deprived of oxygen.”  It might also improve surgical techniques, Andrea Thompson wrote.Who would have imagined a bird being a champion deep-sea diver?  The diversity and talents of birds should turn us all into bird admirers and bird watchers.  Watch for a sparrow or hummingbird and consider how different it is to an emperor penguin, or an ostrich, or a peregrine falcon.  Yet the sparrow is no less intelligently designed and amazing in its own ways, too.  Watch for the birds in your vicinity and learn something about them on WhatBird.com.(Visited 8 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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