The challenges of rugby’s return to training explained

first_imgProfessional sport returns in phase 2 of Scotland’s Covid-19 route map. Conditional on public health advice so contact sport unlikely to be at the front of the queue. pic.twitter.com/mXHcszHxRC— Cammy Black – Scottish Rugby Podcast (@CammyBlack) May 21, 2020“It’s doing that week after week and preparing properly for every game. And so you need to be very tolerant for training, because anyone can get through that one week, you can get through it and get through an 80-minute game and you can do that once. But to do that six weeks on the bounce you have to have a load of resilience, which is what top players do.“But as rugby has evolved and science has taken over and the understanding of human performance has improved, a big component of fitness now is training tolerance and building a sort of a chronic training load into the guys. When you do that, that’s the bit that gets fewer injuries.”Another byproduct of a truncated pre-season, if we endeavour to complete this season, is that we may see coaches’ schemes get stripped back. The clock is definitely ticking for any S&C department – and regardless of Bronco scores, rugby is a multi-faceted sport.For those who under-performed before Covid-19 hit, concluding the season after this break may represent a clean slate. But regardless, hard work will lie ahead. Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. The challenges of rugby’s return to training explainedWhile those in the UK and Ireland wait for clarity on when players should return to training at their club, in Italy one side is back at it.“Our Covid-19 crisis board, composed of our club’s and other external doctors, arranged a full and detailed protocol in order to respect the national and regional laws over this Phase Two in Italy and sport’s return to action at an individual stage,” explains a representative from Zebre.“Before starting any kind of activity, a serological test was done to understand if someone had the Covid-19 antibodies. In case someone was found positive, the club would start deeper analysis. As no one was found positive, (on Wednesday) every player got back to action on the pitch for his individual return to fitness – but not to rugby.“We’re waiting, as soccer is, for a full protocol for the return to contact training in the coming days/weeks and also for the Italian Rugby Union’s return to rugby guidelines.”Related: World Rugby’s Covid-19 return to play guidelinesIn Australia and New Zealand, they too are back into the grind. With fitness testing being conducted, it made global news that All Blacks star Beauden Barrett was busting records at the Bronco test. Yet elsewhere in Europe, there is rising consternation over rumoured schedules – with everyone waiting for a decree from governing bodies. We all need to know if the season can be completed at all. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Addressing this, Mellalieu says that players will recognise the financial imperative to get rugby back up and running. But it will be a strange experience at first. And tough.Related: Remembering the day Jackass joined London Irish trainingHe asks: “Is it realistic to be able to expect players to peak within a four- to five-week reconditioning phase? It’s very difficult to do, and then you’ve got a lot of contextual factors.“So if you’ve been a professional for ten years, you’ll have had nine or ten pre-seasons, you know how to handle your body, you’re probably very experienced at coming back into rugby and delivering very quickly, very successfully.“With your less experienced player, the rookie who has just come out of the academy, you’re finding your way in the group and it may take a lot longer to hit your straps. So there’s this desire to get everyone together and get games played but then I think there will be real challenges around actually getting good performances out of teams.“Because it’s one thing wanting to get people fit to be able to play, but actually then to perform is a real challenge. Obviously that’s where the pressure will come on the coaching staff, within that condensed time, to be able to deliver a programme that not only shows players are medically fit to play but also perform to their best.”Wood work: Tom Wood at home (Getty Images)Which is one side, but just as Gill said there will be an element of needing to hold some players back, Mellalieu knows there will be players who are straining to get back to some semblance of ‘normality’ or at least have some hard work to look forward to. And there’s another element.He clarifies: “I’ve been involved in some research work with the PRL and the RPA and the RFU around the psychological load of the season. And towards February, March the grind kicks in and we get an increased perception of load and symptoms we’ll see of a kind of burnout and overtraining and things like that. Mentally the boys feel tired.“We’ve almost chopped that bit off. Just as we were getting to the grind point, post-Christmas and Europe, everyone suddenly called off the day-to-day of having to go into the training ground. They’ve been told to train at home.“So as much as there are anxieties about when will we start back, the financial, the contractual, there probably has been a little bit of a recovery, regeneration for the players. Now, it’s not fully been time away from the game where you’ve been able to go and spend two weeks and lay on the beach and forget about the sport. Because everyone’s been in a training limbo. You’ve been expected to train just in case you come back early.“There’s not full recovery, like a proper off-season. But I definitely think a lot of the boys have just said, ‘I’ve got time in my family that I wouldn’t have had before. I’m loving seeing the kids, spending time with them, getting stuff done in the garden or all those jobs you have to cram into typical off-season.’ So I think there are a lot of positives in that sense.”As teams first come back in and maintain distancing measures, Mellalieu hopes innovations come to the fore. Digital interaction with online demonstrations could come in handy, as will visualisation and plenty of team discussion as contact comes back in and teams have to work on cohesion in a short space of time.PRE-ORDER RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE’S 60TH ANNIVERSARY ISSUE (JUL-20) HEREUp in Edinburgh, head of S&C Nick Lumley has looked to other sports like weightlifting and boxing, where prolonged time off between intense competition phases is more of the norm. But preparing an ambitious group of players to re-enter a season after enforced time on the sidelines is such a new challenge. Exciting, sure, but it is still terrain with no footprints on it.Lumley explains: “The challenge is the end point is the same as ever (putting players into competition in optimum shape), but what we don’t know is the starting point, because we don’t know the effect this time off has had on them.“They’ll have maintained (some) level of health and fitness, but we don’t really know fully how they’re going to come back. And so some guys naturally will do lots of training because they enjoy it and it’s good for their head and it’s good for their bodies, and it’s what they enjoy doing.“Some of them will have done loads of running, for instance, some of them have their own gyms so will have done loads and loads of weights. Some guys will have been doing circuits in the front room with a couple of dumb-bells because that’s what they’ve got. But from all these different starting points we’ve got to get them all to the same finishing point.Isolation station: Jack Nowell at home (Getty Images)“A big thing over the course of preseason, S&C wise, is that we need to build training load. Guys who do longer pre-seasons have fewer injuries. That doesn’t mean that if you have a long pre-season you won’t get injured, it just means you’re less likely to. That’s a very consistent trend that we’ve observed. This will be my fourth pre-season at Edinburgh and every single year we observe that the guys that get through pre-season, have fewer injuries in the season.“We’ve got very good rugby coaches who prepare the team very well, we’re well drilled and well organised and they do a really good job. They bring all the components together on the field on a Friday night, but as part of that is the training week that goes into that. We work hard during the week.“So it’s not just preparing guys to get through 80 minutes – it’s preparing guys to get to 80 minutes, have a day off and then train again on Monday or on Sunday. Two days later you’re back on the training field, repairing and reviewing and preparing for the next game, and then going again the day after. If you’re a forward it works out as 15 to 18km (run) a week, plus a lot of contacts and collissions. In the backs that’s in the early 20s. RETURNING TO PLAY AFTER PROLONGED TRAINING RESTRICTIONS IN COLLISION SPORTS accepted Int J Sports [email protected] @EliteSC7 @close_nutrition @Nicgill4 @Breathe_to_win @Andy_Kasper @drsimonkemp @SteveMellalieu Nick Pierce @fizziobob @BenjaminTWall @westy160991 @mattjcrossie pic.twitter.com/BQvTueLUph— Prof Ben Jones (@23Benjones) May 14, 2020Among those names on the paper is Stephen Mellalieu, Professor in Sport Psychology and Associate Dean for Research at Cardiff Met, who also helps out the Ospreys. He has done research alongside the RFU and RPA too.“A key period of reconditioning is needed – physical, tactical, technical, and mental before the players go back to full games,” says Mellalieu of the big takeaways. “Player have been able to undertake a degree of conditioning and you will have see Barrett smashing the Bronco test. So boys have been out to train, do a lot of running work and lifting work as well. But as you know, the biggest in the gym isn’t necessarily the best rugby player and they may be physically conditioned, but they need to be contact conditioned, to be prepared to play.Related: The uncertainty facing out-of-work coaches“The only  evidence we have (from a collision sport) about breaks in seasons is the NFL lockdown back in 2011. And there was a sharp spike in injuries when the NFL boys returned to competition and to training. So contact doesn’t just allow you to make better hits, contact obviously protects you from injury. So the concern is that if players have to do an accelerated return to rugby programme, they may be at greater risk of injury when they do start playing, essentially.”When you look at the academic literature, according to Mellalieu, there is a fair amount written on the effects of isolation and confinement, from a psychological perspective. He describes this global situation as a “trauma” and points out that: “We’re all people first; athletes or workers second.” Take the rugby out, there is clearly potential for distress in relation to this trauma.Back at it: Melbourne Rebels doing conditioning this month (Getty Images)If someone is unable to do their job, he says, it potentially impacts their sense of identity, for example. There are lots of challenges with training at home too. The broad approach is assessing how to deal with players after such a seismic change. But as well as that, any return to training ahead of the season resuming will be unlike any pre-season the athletes have experienced before.For a start there is the standard anxieties of a pre-season – impressing as you head towards the last year of a contract, hitting targets, returning from injury and more – but also the added layer of unease generated by having concerns over the health implications of joining back up. After all, any player may have a pregnant partner or also care for an elderly relative. Then there is the ticking clock, should we set a date for competition resuming. Prem Rugby’s return becoming more & more messy. Some clubs say 4 weeks needed to prep; others 8. Social distancing will only work in phase one of training at best. Mass testing required but costly. Plus players still on furlough and rules unclear. Early July games now v unlikely— Chris Jones BBC (@chjones9) May 21, 2020The Professional Game Board in England has stated more time is needed “to ensure that players, staff and officials can return to a safe training environment, and that is not expected to be in place for a minimum of two weeks”. So training in small groups is not likely to resume until June at the earliest.A report in the Telegraph describes the completion of a full English Premiership’s season as a ‘long shot’, while there are differing theories around the length of time clubs would be allowed to train together before full action does resume.But how difficult is it to get back into the swing of things anyway?“I would not say there is consensus on exactly what needs to happen following the lockdowns that have occurred in most countries,” explains All Blacks strength and conditioning coach Nic Gill of best practice for returning to training.“However, there is consensus that we must progress things based on a return to play window and what players have been able to do while at home and what sort of condition they come back in… A little bit of reverse engineering is likely to be required.“Here in New Zealand we have come out of lockdown and will look to play in three-and-a-half weeks. Our isolation has been about seven weeks but all players stayed on programmes with the anticipation we would be playing again.Solo sesh: All Black Beauden Barrett training alone during lockdown (Getty Images)“It is reasonably difficult to get back into things from a structure and progression perspective, but also with ‘rules’ to return to play around hygiene, cleanliness, contact tracing and the fact that many teams have probably lost staff or resources due to the pandemic. However, there is huge excitement to get back playing rugby so probably a little bit of pulling back will be required by staff as players’ energy and enthusiasm is peaking!”Related: Anatomy of a rugby transfer during Covid-19 crisisGill, alongside many others from the academic arm of the game, also contributed to a paper entitled Returning to play after prolonged training restrictions in collision sports that landed this month. When clubs get back to training, they have to work hard on conditioning, cohesion and dealing from rugby’s grind again Toally different: Harlequins during a traditional pre-season session (Getty Images) last_img read more

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Zé House / Paratelier

first_img Area:  186 m² Area:  186 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project 2014 Zé House / ParatelierSave this projectSaveZé House / Paratelier photographs:  Leonardo FinottiPhotographs:  Leonardo Finotti Collaborators:Hugo Amaro, Ilaria La Corte, Inês AnselmoPlot Area:90,63m2Budget:80.000 eurosArchitect In Charge:Leonardo Paiella, Mónica RavazzoloCity:PalmelaCountry:PortugalMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!© Leonardo FinottiRecommended ProductsMetallicsStudcoWall Stop Ends – EzyCapWoodParklex International S.L.Wood cladding – FacadeWoodTechnowoodPergola SystemsMetallicsTECU®Copper Surface – Classic CoatedText description provided by the architects. Inhabited since prehistoric ages due to its privileged and strategic location, Palmela presents nowadays as the result of the influence of the different cultures that successively inhabited that area until today. The presence of the Medieval Castle on the landscape is evident. This becames a dual relationship specially on clear days, when, from the castle keep, the landscape opens up to Lisbon. In addition to this strong historical identity, the territory integrates two of the most important protected areas in Portugal: the Arrábida Natural Park and the Sado Estuary Nature Reserve. History and Landscape merge in one place.Save this picture!SectionIn the heart of this small village, a void is subjected to the presence of the castle and the surrounding landscape: the Barris Valley. Thus arises a new volume, firmly anchored to the ground, which consists of a concrete monolith, with simple lines, that relates to the massive figure of the castle and, at the same time, to the geometry of the articulated roofs of the surrounding. This construction redefines and concludes the limit of the facade of the Boa Vista Square, strengthening its structure.Save this picture!© Leonardo FinottiThe surfaces and materials reveal the construction process of the building (like the castle itself), establishing not only the geometric relationship with the environment but also the chromatic relationship through the use of ochre pigment added to concrete (tone present on the roofs and facades that make the urban landscape of Palmela). The wooden panels used for concrete casting imprint their texture to the continuous surface of the exterior facades, giving them a natural pine vein relief. After cleaning and planed, these panels were recovered and reused on the inner floors, walls, and furnisher, establishing the same metric rhythm inside and outside of the house.Save this picture!DiagramSave this picture!DiagramThe spatial organization is divided by three levels, distributed by a wooden staircase. On the ground floor, an open space, lower than the road level, constitutes as an access lobby, characterized by the natural light. On the first floor it’s located the more private areas of the house, organized along a patio situated on one side of the lot that ensures their optimal illumination and ventilation conditions. The second floor aggregates the areas designated to the social life of the house, where the openings were designed to capture different landscapes, with different scales, at different times of the day. From the study area of the room that faces the Boa Vista Square it’s possible to track its daily movement fluxes; at noon, the opening of the dining room frames a static image of the castle and, at sunset, the opening of the living room encloses the extensive verdant vineyards of the Barris Valley landscape.Save this picture!© Leonardo FinottiProject gallerySee allShow lessExclusive Video: Innovation Center UC – Anacleto Angelini / Alejandro Aravena | ELEM…Architecture NewsAD Interviews: Will Bruder / Will Bruder ArchitectsInterviews Share Houses Architects: Paratelier Area Area of this architecture project Year:  CopyHouses•Palmela, Portugal Photographs Zé House / Paratelier Projects 2014 CopyAbout this officeParatelierOfficeFollowProductsWoodConcrete#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesPalmelaHousesPortugalPublished on September 14, 2014Cite: “Zé House / Paratelier” 14 Sep 2014. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogPanels / Prefabricated AssembliesTechnowoodSiding Façade SystemPlasticsMitrexSolar SidingMetal PanelsAurubisCopper Alloy: Nordic BronzeArmchairsAndreu WorldGrand Raglan – Lounge ChairSinksBradley Corporation USASinks – Frequency® FL-SeriesPlantingSikaGreen RoofsStonesCosentinoSilestone Surfaces – Ethereal CollectionMetal PanelsLongboard®Aluminum Battens – Link & Lock – 8″Panels / Prefabricated AssembliesFranken-SchotterFacade Panels – Dietfurt LimestoneWindowsRabel Aluminium SystemsMinimal Casement Windows – Rabel 8400 Slim Super Thermal PlusWoodGustafsWood Cladding in St. Erik Eye HospitalLightsKKDCLighting – Groove FLEXMore products »Save世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my stream “COPY” Year:  ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/544086/ze-house-paratelier Clipboard ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/544086/ze-house-paratelier Clipboard Save this picture!© Leonardo Finotti+ 19 Share Portugal “COPY” ArchDailylast_img read more

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Compact Awards 2008 open for nominations

first_img About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Howard Lake | 26 July 2008 | News Compact Awards 2008 open for nominations AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Tagged with: Awards Trading  16 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Nominations can now be made to this year’s Compact awards which are designed to reward and recognise the best partnerships between third sector and public sector organisations at a national, regional and local level.There are five award categories:* Local Compact of the Year Award* Compact Award for Excellence at a Regional Level* Compact Award for Excellence at a National Level* Compact Champion of the Year Award* The Commissioner’s AwardThe closing date for entries is 29 August 2008.www.thecompact.org.uk/compactawardslast_img read more

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Texas march against legal lynchings

first_imgTexas Death Penalty Abolition Movement activists participated in the Juneteenth parade and festival on June 18 in Houston’s historic Third Ward at Emancipation Park, which was bought and established by freed slaves in 1872. The Abolition Movement makes the connection between slavery and what exists on Texas prison farms today.“We recognize the continuum from lynchings after the Civil War to the legal lynchings that occur now in Huntsville, Texas, where 537 people have been executed by the state of Texas since 1982,” said Joanne Gavin, a founder of the Abolition Movement in the mid-1990s and a veteran of Mississippi’s Civil Rights Movement.Joining the Abolition Movement at the parade were veterans of Houston’s Black Panther Party, whose leader, Carl Hampton, was murdered by Houston police a few blocks from Emancipation Park. Houston cops were judge, jury and executioners of Hampton, a brilliant revolutionary and charismatic leader until his death in 1970. Also in the contingent was the Committee to Free Juan Balderas, who has been on Texas death row since 2015.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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Oscar López boosts struggle for Puerto Rican independence

first_imgOscar López Rivera’s presence in circles of the Boricua diaspora at this crucial moment in the history of Puerto Rico represents a great boost towards the unity and the advancement of the struggle for decolonization and independence as the only way forward for true sovereignty.López Rivera’s recent visit to New York had several purposes: to meet with political activists, attend the June 11 National Puerto Rican Day Parade and testify at the June 19 meeting of the United Nations’ Special Committee on Decolonization.Many meetings and events were held during the days prior to and after the June 11 parade, not only with the diaspora, but also with labor and other activists. One was a breakfast sponsored by the SEIU Local 1199 of health care workers, where several well-known figures attended, including renowned sister Pam Africa.Puerto Rican Day ParadeIn May, the Parade Board had decided to dedicate the parade to López Rivera and nominated him as National Freedom Hero. Within days, most of the corporate sponsors — Coca-Cola, JetBlue, Goya Foods, the Yankees, Univision, etc. — withdrew their sponsorship. Police, firefighters and other groups associated with “law and order” or sympathizers of the pro-statehood status formula refused to attend.Puerto Ricans who favor independence then launched a boycott campaign aimed at these firms’ social media. Many of those commenting expressed their satisfaction, stating, “We got our culture, our parade, back,” referring negatively to the commercialization of the parade in the last decades.The result was a magnificent demonstration of Puerto Ricans’ fierce determination to prevail despite the criminal attacks of the colonial powers. Thousands of Boricuas attended. Floats and contingents did not simply advertise commodities as in the past, but carried signs and banners demanding independence. They demanded the ousting of the dictatorial Fiscal Control Board, the “junta” that the U.S. Congress set up as a collection agency to  grab the enormous — and illegitimate — debt that has been imposed on Puerto Rico.It was not just a Puerto Rican Day Parade. It was a protest, a march for sovereignty and independence of a nation. López Rivera, standing on a float in the front of the march, was able to appreciate the enthusiasm of a rebellious diaspora in the very heart of Wall Street’s city.Testimony at the U.N.That same enthusiasm surrounded López Rivera when he testified at the United Nations on June 19. Received with a standing ovation, he spoke movingly for 20 minutes — a special time concession. The Puerto Rican governor’s representative criticized this concession.Below are excerpts of his presentation, entitled:“What has United States colonialism done to Puerto Rico and the Puerto Rican people?”“Today there are over five million Puerto Ricans living in the diaspora, while there are less than three-and-a-half million living in Puerto Rico. … I have seen an accelerated gentrification process constructing condominiums costing one million dollars or more.“Since I am familiar with what gentrification does to poor people, I know the luxury condominiums are not being built for them. … In Culebra, Vieques and around the coast of Puerto Rico, where the beaches are the most beautiful, the construction of luxury building is already overtaking the landscape.“The colonialists who administer the colony give incentives to the builders and to buyers who are foreigners, and deny providing incentives to [Puerto Rican] small businesses and small home owners.“It has been the goal of the U.S. government, since it invaded and occupied Puerto Rico, to depopulate it. … And the last wave began 17 years ago. More than one million Puerto Ricans have moved to the diaspora, causing the biggest brain drain in Puerto Rico’s history, because most of the emigrants are professionals. … If the School of Medicine in Puerto Rico graduates 100 doctors, 85 percent of them have to emigrate.“Any country that loses two-thirds of its population, including its best developed human resource, cannot see itself having a strong economy and good quality of life for its citizens. …“What the Fiscal Control Board is making the colonialist administrators of Puerto Rico do is more worrisome. … By August, 169 schools will be closed. Teachers will be losing jobs, and communities, especially the poorer ones, will be losing their schools. Behind the scenes, the colonialists are pushing more and more their privatization plans. They aren’t satisfied that privatization in Puerto Rico has played a major role in bringing the economy to its worse conditions in Puerto Rico’s history. …“It is threatening the future of the University of Puerto Rico. The goal of the Fiscal Control Board is to take away close to half a billion dollars from the university’s budget. At the same time, it is looking for ways to raise the tuition and to force the University of Puerto Rico to close some of its eleven campuses and to sell much of its property, especially land that it has been using for experiments in the past.“What the Fiscal Control Board seems to be doing is trying to privatize the university system. All the money that will be taken away from the public education system will be used as payment to fill the coffers of the banks and hedge funds. While Puerto Ricans will be poorer and more destitute, the colonialists and the banking industry will become richer. Thus, Puerto Rico is being made poorer and poorer and at the same time depopulated of its native population.“In spite of the fact that the future of Puerto Rico looks very bleak, many Puerto Ricans believe this is the best moment to wage an effective decolonizing process. We know that the majority of Puerto Ricans love Puerto Rico, our national identity, our culture, our language and our origins. We see the potential that Puerto Rico has to become a strong nation and an asset to the economy of Caribbean and Latin American countries. We have the human resources and the other basic resources to transform Puerto Rico into the edenic garden it has the potential of being.“Because this is such a moment, we are asking this Committee to take the issue of the decolonization of Puerto Rico to the General Assembly and ask it to fulfill its responsibilities to bring to an end the colonization of Puerto Rico by the U.S. government.“I hope you will do whatever you can to bring to an end the colonial status of Puerto Rico, to help us make Puerto Rico the nation it has the potential of being, and to be part of the community of nations.“Thank you. En resistencia y lucha siempre, Oscar López Rivera.” (minhpuertorico.org)FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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Palestinian liberation leader salutes Black Panthers

first_imgThe following article by imprisoned Palestinian national liberation movement leader Ahmad Sa’adat — the general secretary of the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine — was posted on samidoun.net on Oct. 15. It was originally published in French as the preface to the new French-language ­edition of “Revolutionary Suicide” by Huey Newton.Samidoun writes: “On 15 October — the anniversary of the founding of the Black Panther Party — we salute the profound legacy and ongoing struggle of the Black Liberation Movement, on the front lines of confrontation against U.S. racism, imperialism and capitalism. Sa’adat’s article, published in English for the first time here, elucidates the common struggles and revolutionary ­alliances of the Palestinian and Black movements. It focuses particularly on the struggle against racist and colonial imprisonment.”It is an honor to write an introduction to this book by a great leader of the Black Liberation struggle in the United States, Huey P. Newton. From inside the occupier’s Ramon prison, on behalf of myself, my comrades and the Palestinian prisoners’ movement, we extend our clenched fists of solidarity and salute and arms of embrace to our Black comrades whose struggle for liberation in the belly of the beast continues today against fierce repression.From Ansar to Attica to Lannemezan, the prison is not only a physical space of confinement but a site of struggle of the oppressed confronting the oppressor. Whether the name is Mumia Abu-Jamal, Walid Daqqa or Georges Ibrahim Abdallah, political prisoners behind bars can and must be a priority for our movements. These names illustrate the continuity of struggle against our collective enemy — their legacies of organizing that reach back to the anti-colonial, liberation movements of the 1960s, 1970s, 1980s to today. Political prisoners are not simply individuals; they are leaders of struggle and organizing within prison walls that help to break down and dismantle the bars, walls, and chains that act to divide us from our peoples and communities in struggle. They face repeated isolation, solitary confinement, cruel tortures of the occupier and jailer that seek to break the will of the prisoner and their deep connection to their people.So when we witness the escalation against our movement as we see today in the Philippines, as we see the murderous and orchestrated attacks on our Palestinian resistance, as we see the criminalization of Black people and movements, it is clear that we are still facing the situation that Huey Newton identified and confronted. We are still seeking to defend our peoples from the relentless assaults of capitalism, Zionism and imperialism and their police and military forces. We have not yet been able to realize our dreams and transform the prisons into museums of liberation. Revolutionaries across the world struggle and dream for this future in every movement of oppressed people. Indeed, when we speak of the prisoners’ movement, we are in essence speaking of Resistance.Prisons exist for a reason, for the needs and interests of those with power. And … where there is occupation and colonization, there will be prisons and all the laws and legal frameworks erected to legitimize exploitation, oppression and injustice and criminalize resistance and liberation. From the Fugitive Slave Acts of the 1800s to the “terrorist lists” that seek to criminalize and isolate the resistance movements of the peoples of the world, these are reflections of a war on the people. We salute sister Assata Shakur, still struggling and free in Cuba, while facing renewed threats and “terrorist” labeling to justify hunting down this global symbol of freedom.This also illustrates clearly that the struggle, the cause, and the movement of the Black Panther Party and the Black Liberation Movement are not a closed file. It is an open file, an ongoing struggle and a continuing movement for justice and liberation. As I write today, the revolutionary Palestinian Left, the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine, is marking its 50th year of struggle, a time for both celebration and review of this legacy in order to sharpen and strengthen our march toward revolutionary victory. Similarly, we have just passed the 50th anniversary of the founding of the Black Panther Party, whose vision for revolutionary change continues to be just as relevant today.This is a legacy that is carried on both with ideas and with people themselves whose histories of struggle continue to animate and inspire their communities. You could pass by the first prisoner of the PFLP somewhere on the streets of Berlin, still organizing Palestinians. You could feel the legacy of the Black Panther Party and the continuing Black struggle on the streets of Chicago, Oakland and Harlem. There are people who carry within them the legacies of struggle as a human treasure. The experiences of the elders of our movement, especially those who have come through prison, stand alongside the ideas passed down through writing, books and literature in carrying on, from one generation to another, the trajectory and path of struggle toward a future in which youth are coming forward to lead Black and Palestinian revolutionary struggles for liberation.Every political prisoner, whether they are currently in prison or not in prison, carries within them the dream and reality of liberation and what it can and must mean in practice. Today, when we look at the Black Liberation Movement or the Indigenous and Native struggle in the United States and Canada, we are talking about the same camp of enemy that we confront in occupied Palestine. The bullets that assassinated Malcolm X or Fred Hampton could have been used to kill Ghassan Kanafani or Khaled Nazzal or Mahmoud Hamshari, and today we see the same tear gas and bullets shipped around the world for use against the people. We see corporations like G4S profiting from the attacks on our movements and the mass imprisonments of our people and U.S., European and Israeli police forces exchanging training with one another to escalate racism, “counter-insurgency” and repression on the streets of our cities, camps and villages.In our circles here in prisons, we always hope and wish to communicate to movements elsewhere and political prisoners everywhere. We want to share our experiences with one another to strengthen all our movements for liberation and the movement to free our prisoners. The political prisoners have firsthand experience of confrontation, and the experience of the prison can be a transformative one for a political prisoner. It is not an individual experience but a collective one; the heroism of a prisoner is not simply to be in prison but to understand that they carry with them the leadership of a movement and a continuing struggle in a new location that continues to have international reverberations. Georges Ibrahim Abdallah today is struggling in Lannemezan prison just as Mumia Abu-Jamal is struggling in Mahanoy. The heroism also does not come simply in that one has spent years in prison and now has been released; but in being a veteran of struggle who continues to carry the message of liberation for those who remain.The political prisoner is not weak and is not broken, despite all of their best efforts. The responsibility of the political prisoner is to safeguard the flame. This is not a role that we have sought out or worked for. But now that we are in this position we must hold our position to set an example, not to our people, who are rooted and steadfast, but to the enemy, to show that imprisonment will not work to defeat us or our people. We carry a cause, not simply an individual search for freedom. Israel or France or the U.S. would free us, or Georges Abdallah, or Mumia Abu-Jamal, if we were willing to become tools of the system or betray our people. But instead, the prisons have generated striking examples of a culture of resistance, from art, to literature to political ideas.Today, our movements and the revolutionary movements around the world are facing very difficult times. However, these difficult times can also hold value if we look more closely; we are paving the way for new generations of revolutionaries around the world who can still carry the demand for socialism, for people’s democracy, for an alternative world. In the era in which Newton wrote, movements and prisoners shared experiences and communicated through letters, books and art, often smuggled out of or into prisons, past censors and iron walls. Today, with all the great revolutions in technology, political prisoners are struggling to have their words heard at all, denied access to even telephones to speak with our families and loved ones.Why do we still consider and read and reprint the writings of Huey Newton today? Fundamentally, because his analysis and that of the Black Panther Party was right and continues to be right, valid and essential. Today, when we see the ravages of U.S. imperialism, the threats of Trump against the world and the shooting down of Black people on U.S. streets by cops, then the fundamental correctness and necessity of the Black Panthers’ work is underlined. Today, when popular movements are under attack and liberation struggles labeled as “terrorist” and criminalized, we see a massive, coercive attack on our peoples. Prisons are only one form of coercion in the hands of the occupier, colonizer, capitalist and imperialist; stripping the knowledge of the people and imposing new forms of isolation are yet more forms of coercion.The imposition of consumerism, the stripping of peoples from their humanity, the isolation of peoples are all forms of coercion alongside the prisons that act to undermine our movements, our peoples and our visions of liberation. They want to see all our movements isolated from one another, through the terror of the “terrorist list” and the silence of solitary confinement. Capitalist and imperialist media blanket the world, so even here in an Israeli prison we hear about the latest technologies in the U.S. while the repression of Black people is rendered invisible. But the reality today is that every day, a little Huey or Assata or Khalida or Ishaq is being born that can carry forward the vision of their people.Huey Newton and the Black Panthers stood for socialism, for social justice, against racism, imperialism and war, from the streets of Oakland to the refugee camps of Lebanon. Huey Newton said, “We support the Palestinians’ just struggle for liberation one hundred percent. We will go on doing this, and we would like for all of the progressive people of the world to join our ranks in order to make a world in which all people can live.”Of course, I cannot speak as an expert about incarceration in the United States today. But just looking at the numbers is a stunning illustration of what is deeply wrong with the system. As Palestinians, we also face an experience of negation, of attack on our existence, of being treated as lesser or non-humans for our designated racial identity. We understand through our own experiences how occupation and capitalism are all about profit and the example that U.S. prisons are creating for the world, where prisons are seen as a source of cheap and coerced free labor and a profit for capitalism. We see how incarceration is used to control, divide and threaten communities and peoples under attack. Incarceration means a lot of money for corporations at the same time that it means a direct threat to Black children and their futures. And this is the “security solution” that Trump and U.S. imperialism is marketing to the world as a solution to the crisis of capitalism, a solution built on bloody and brutal exploitation.Here in our cells, we can feel the reverberations of these attacks and the physical impact of them in the invasions and inspections of the special repressive units of the occupier. We also see the potential and, indeed the necessity, for movements to rise inside prisons together with those on the outside. We see thousands of people sentenced to massive sentences of 20, 30, 40 years in prison and even more, stripping people’s freedom and taking people’s lives. Resistance is critical and it must have a real impact on people’s lives. Our sacrifice in prison has meaning when it can lead to fruits for the poor and liberation for our peoples. Our struggle must impact people’s lives in a material way.From Ireland to the United States to France to Palestine, political prisoners continue to be leaders in movements fighting racism, imperialism and colonialism. We also see the prisoners of the Palestinian movement facing political imprisonment around the world in the jails of the enemy — from the ­heroic ­Rasmea Odeh forced from the United States to the Five prisoners for Palestine, called the Holy Land Five, held in extreme solitary confinement alongside Black strugglers for engaging in charity work for our people, to our dear comrade Georges Abdallah who has suffered for 34 years in French prisons.The prisons and the political prisoners are also an example of the power and necessity of “breaking the law.” The law — the law of the imperialist and the colonizer — is used to steal the rights and resources of our people and also to justify our imprisonment and repression and criminalization. Through the collective “breaking” of the law and its power to define justice and injustice — when people, collectively, confront and “break” the law, not merely as individuals but as a collective power, it loses its claim to legitimacy. Breaking of the law must become the norm, and not the exception — the law of capitalism, imperialism and exploitation.Political prisoners are jailed because they fear our actions and they fear our ideas, our power to mobilize our peoples in a revolutionary way against their exploitation and colonization. They fear our communication and they fear the powers of our people. They fear that if we come together that we will build an international front for the liberation of oppressed peoples. They know, and deeply fear, that we can truly build an alternative world. For them, this is the terror of defeat, but for us, and for our peoples, this is the hope of freedom and the promise of victory.Ahmad Sa’adatRamon PrisonNovember 2017FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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Leaders urged to give joint commitment to press freedom

first_imgNews April 16, 2009 – Updated on January 25, 2016 Leaders urged to give joint commitment to press freedom Help by sharing this information Reporters Without Borders hopes the two-day Summit of the Americas that begins tomorrow in Trinidad and Tobago will result in a firm commitment to media freedom and human rights by the participating presidents.It will be US President Barack Obama’s first time at a gathering of the hemisphere’s leaders and comes on the heels of an official visit by him to Mexico. There has been evidence of a stronger commitment to press freedom in the United States since his 20 January inauguration and his administration, which wants to break with its predecessor’s practices, is seeking a seat on the United Nations Human Rights Council.Noting this new political will, Reporters Without Borders wrote to President Obama on 17 February expressing the hope that the country of the First Amendment will act according to its principles as regards three western hemisphere press freedom issues in which it is directly concerned.The first involves Mexico, where journalists’ safety is threatened most. A total of 46 journalists have been killed in Mexico since 2000 and drug cartel activity is not solely to blame. The Obama administration is dispatching some 400 FBI agents plus 100 agents from the ATF (Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives) to help combat the drug trafficking in Mexico and secure the border region.Journalists on the Mexican side of the border often face a choice between death and going into exile. What happened to Armando Rodríguez Carreón and Emilio Gutiérrez Soto, two journalists working for the Ciudad Juárez-based daily El Diario, dramatically illustrates this dilemma. Rodríguez was gunned down on 13 November 2008 during a surge in armed clashes between the cartels and the Mexican federal authorities. Gutiérrez was held by the US immigration authorities for seven months after fleeing across the border on 15 June 2008.The fight against impunity depends on the determination of the Mexican federal authorities and their ability to control their own agents. But a much more ambitious US commitment to arms control is vital to security efforts in the region. It is the United States that supplies organised crime with firearms in Mexico and Central America, where criminal violence has reached an alarming level. Two journalists, one in Guatemala and one in Honduras, have been killed there since the start of the year. Both of them were trying to cover violent crime.Constitutional principles that are taken for granted are stripped of any meaning by the predatory activity of drug traffickers and paramilitaries in other parts of the America, especially Colombia. Reporters Without Borders shares the view of some legislators in Washington that the US taxpayer’s generous funding for the Plan Colombia war on drugs should be adjusted according to the Colombian government’s real efforts on behalf of human rights.Complicity in dangerous activity and irresponsible statements by President Alvaro Uribe have imperilled journalists who do not enjoy his favour and pushed them into exile. One of them, Hollman Morris, producer of the programme “Contravía” on Colombian public television’s Canal Uno, recently testified to the Inter-American Court of Human Rights and the US congress in Washington.The third hemispheric issue concerns the only country in the region with no democratic institutions, Cuba, whose 200-odd political prisoners include 23 journalists. Reporters Without Borders has called for an end to the US embargo – which has been in place since 1962 and which has penalised the Cuban people while allowing the regime to reinforce its repression of dissidents – and supports the embargo-easing measures adopted by the Obama administration.When Raúl Castro took over as president in 2008, Cuba signed two UN human rights conventions, thereby giving an undertaking to the international community. But this undertaking has not been translated into any action. The Latin American countries that want to bring Cuba into the regional integration process should attach clear conditions.Reporters Without Borders hopes that the issue of freedoms in Cuba will be the subject of a debate and resolutions agreed by the countries represented at the summit. Respect for a country’s sovereignty does not in any way preclude reminding it of the obligations which it decided of its own accord to assume.Enshrined in the constitutions of all of the hemisphere’s countries, freedom of the press and freedom of expression would acquire more substance if all the counties brought their legislation into line with the principles of the American Convention on Human Rights. This includes the decriminalisation of defamation and insult, adopted by Mexico in 2007 and currently being debated in Uruguay. These offences often continue to be punishable by imprisonment and the legislation encourages abuse of authority. It is time to dismantle such hangovers from the military dictatorships of the past. Argentina is in the process of doing this with a new law that will democratise broadcasting.Press freedom, one of the linchpins of democracy, often results in critical coverage that some elected governments have difficulty tolerating. The “wars” sometimes waged by the media in countries such as Bolivia and Venezuela do not justify an attitude of mistrust towards the entire press in the name of any ideology. Reporters Without Borders hopes the two-day Summit of the Americas that begins tomorrow in Trinidad and Tobago will result in a firm commitment to media freedom and human rights by the participating presidents. RSF_en Organisation last_img read more

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Elvin to be sentenced in March after being found guilty on 26 charges

first_img Twitter 75 positive cases of Covid confirmed in North Man arrested on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences in Derry Facebook By News Highland – December 21, 2011 Google+ Previous articleCouncillors fail to agree budget for 2012 – how the day unfoldedNext articleFamily of Gary Butcher devastated with sentence passed on to his killer News Highland Pinterest News Pinterest WhatsApp Google+center_img A jury took just 62 minutes at the end of a five-day trial to find a small farmer guilty today of depriving seven people of €177,000.Thomas Elvin, from Meencargagh, Ballybofey, who ran a company called Pear Shaped Resources based in the British Virgin Islands, claimed at Donegal Circuit Court that he was a penniless bible-believer who wanted to raise millions for benevolent causes.But the jury of five women and six men believed he wanted to finance himself. Although Elvin’s defence lawyer said he had none of the trappings of a con. He had no Ferrari car, no hotels on the continent and no yacht in Donegal Bay.50-year-old Elvin, operated from his 17-acre farm, which has 20 cows, through an Internet contact with a US aide, Larry Marsella who – the court was told – had a plan to raise 25 per cent profit a day on high-risk investments on international currency exchanges.Elvin admitted he hoped to turn 50,000 dollars into 98 million dollars in 45 days. His own counsel said he locked himself into a delusional world through the dangers of the computer and the Internet.His victims said he never mentioned the forex currency operation or that he was putting their money into high-risk investments.None of the money was returned and none of the victims received a single penny in the operation between 2003 and 2005.The victims included a former pub owner and a family with a shop in Donegal town.But worst hit was Sharman Magee, who gave up her job in the Magee clothing factory in Donegal to care for both her elderly parents.When he father died she and her mother invested €102,000 of his insurance policy payments through Elvin and didn’t receive any return. Her mother died when they were being scammed.Elvin was remanded on bail for sentence on March 27 with a recommendation that he undergo a psychological assessment. Twitter WhatsApp Elvin to be sentenced in March after being found guilty on 26 charges Facebook RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Further drop in people receiving PUP in Donegal Main Evening News, Sport and Obituaries Tuesday May 25th 365 additional cases of Covid-19 in Republic Gardai continue to investigate Kilmacrennan firelast_img read more

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HSE West/North-West Maternity review subsumed into national review

first_img Google+ RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Twitter Facebook 75 positive cases of Covid confirmed in North News Gardai continue to investigate Kilmacrennan fire WhatsApp By News Highland – June 24, 2014 Previous articleMcKenna called into Tyrone senior panelNext articleSignificant increase in building commencements in Donegal News Highland Twitter Facebookcenter_img The Minister for Health is under pressure to reveal the terms of reference for a national review of maternity services.Last night it emerged that the HSE West/North-West Hospital Group had shelved a controversial review of services in its area.It follows the resignation of the Group chairman after it emerged he had a stake in the consultancy firm that carried out the review of maternity services in the region.Maternity services in HSE West/North-West will now be subject to the national review already underway by the HSE and Dept of Health.Fianna Fail Senator Marc McSharry says Minister James Reilly needs to make a statement on the future of the country’s maternity services:Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/08mcshMATER.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Further drop in people receiving PUP in Donegal WhatsApp Pinterest Man arrested on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences in Derry Google+ Main Evening News, Sport and Obituaries Tuesday May 25th 365 additional cases of Covid-19 in Republic HSE West/North-West Maternity review subsumed into national review Pinterestlast_img read more

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Local art teachers recognized for students’ efforts

first_img You Might Like Print Article Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day The Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies… Local art teachers recognized for students’ efforts Book Nook to reopen Email the author Next UpPam Smith, coordinator of the annual Student Art Show, said students countywide were challenged with creating art the size of a dollar bill in a variety of categories and in different mediums.“We had almost 400 entries from the different schools in Troy, around the county and also home-schooled students,” Smith said. “We greatly appreciate the sponsorship of Troy Bank & Trust and the opportunity to show the students artwork here at the Johnson Center for the Arts. Sponsored Content By The Penny Hoarder Brenda Campbell, JCA director, said the art center has been a-buzz with students, their family members and friends. Latest Storiescenter_img By Jaine Treadwell Dianna Lee of Troy Bank and Trust joins art teachers Kristy Drinkwater, Jennifer Lindsey, Jennifer Sullivant, Charlotte Walden and coordinator Pam Smith in a presentation ceremony rewarding the art teachers for their students’ successes in the art show. The show was sponsored by TB&T “Everyone has been very impressed with the artistic talent of students throughout the county,” Campbell said. “We are excited to have student art exhibited here.”The teachers expressed appreciation to TB&T for the monetary awards and for the opportunity for their students to participate in the annual art show and to the JCA for hosting the exhibit. Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits The Pike County art teachers whose students took Best of Show honors in the 2020 Student Art Show; Art the Size of a Dollar Bill at the Johnson Center for the Arts were recognized Friday by Troy Bank & Trust, the annual sponsor of the county-wide student art show.Dianna Lee, TB&T marketing officer, presented checks in the amount of $100 each to teachers, Jennifer Lindsey, grades K-3; Kristy Drinkwater, grades 4-6; Jennifer Sullivant, grades 7-9 and Charlotte Walden, grades, 10-12. Lee congratulated the teachers and their students on a job very well done. Lee said the monetary awards will be used to purchase art supplies for the teachers’ classrooms. Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration Local tallies to be OK’d this week The unofficial summary report for the November 3, 2020 Pike County General Election has been made available from the Pike… read more Published 10:28 pm Friday, November 6, 2020 Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Patriot Health ZoneHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential Health32-second Stretch Ends Back Pain & Sciatica (Watch)Healthier LivingThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more

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