Lack of Rain, A Blessing and a Worry

first_imgHome Indiana Agriculture News Lack of Rain, A Blessing and a Worry Lack of Rain, A Blessing and a Worry Previous articleASA Releases More In-Depth Analysis of Farm Bill MarkNext articleApril 24, Byran Hirsch, Dry and Dusty in the SW Gary Truitt SHARE By Gary Truitt – Apr 24, 2012 SHARE Facebook Twitter Indiana’s planting pace is fast and furious, but the lack of rain is becoming a bigger and bigger issue for crops that were planted in March.  Hoosier Ag Today has a network of farmers across the state giving us field updates, and all of them report very dry conditions.  For Byran Hirsh in Gibson County, the last of rain has been both a blessing and a worry, “The rains we have had in this area have only been a few tenths of an inch. We have not been out of the fields for more than a half a day since the end of March.”  He said the weather for planting has been ideal but hopes the dry spell will not  last much longer.Hirsh says it is not a serious situation yet and there is enough moisture in the soil to get the crop up and going, but warns the rains had better come soon, “We will have moisture in the soil and even a few of the field tiles are still running, so we are good for a while yet.”  He told HAT the young crops can last about another 10 days without significant rains.   He added that fields that have been tilled are much dryer and may be in more serious shape.  As he talked with HAT, he was in his tractor planting soybeans, something he does not normally do in April, “I finished my corn about 10 days ago and started on soybeans today.”Listen to the complete field report with Byran Hirsch, made possible by Advanced Ag Solutions.[audio:https://www.hoosieragtoday.com//wp-content/uploads//2012/04/drywrap.mp3|titles=Lack of Rain, A Blessing and a Worry] Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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Listen: Frogflix (Season 2): Episode 8

first_imgReddIt Previous articleWhat we’re reading: Trump backs IsraelNext articleFormer football player credits collegiate success to family’s support Andrew Van Heusden RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Linkedin Andrew Van Heusden is a senior journalism and film-television-digital media major from Brighton, Michigan. He is looking forward to being the digital producer this semester for TCU Student Media. He claims to live in Moudy South throughout the weekdays; but if you can’t find him there, then be sure to try the local movie theaters or the Amon G. Carter Stadium. Twitter ReddIt Listen: Frogflix (Season 2): Episode 15 – Parts 1 & 2 Twitter Facebook printFrogflix co-hosts Andrew, Richard and Michelle talk the return of James Gunn to the “Guardians of the Galaxy” franchise, “The Sopranos” prequel, “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood”, Jordan Peele’s “Us” and more. Andrew Van Heusden + posts Facebookcenter_img Andrew Van Heusdenhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/andrew-van-heusden/ Andrew Van Heusdenhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/andrew-van-heusden/ Andrew Van Heusdenhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/andrew-van-heusden/ Listen: Ball Don’t Lie: Parting Shots Listen: Frogflix (Season 2): Episode 14 Andrew Van Heusdenhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/andrew-van-heusden/ Linkedin Listen: Frogflix (Season 2): Episode 13 World Oceans Day shines spotlight on marine plastic pollution TCU places second in the National Student Advertising Competition, the highest in school history Welcome TCU Class of 2025last_img read more

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JPL-Built Instrument Aboard International Satellite to Gather Precise Atmospheric Measurements to Improve Weather Prediction

first_img Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * HerbeautyInstall These Measures To Keep Your Household Safe From Covid19HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty5 Things To Avoid If You Want To Have Whiter TeethHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyCostume That Makes Actresses Beneath Practically UnrecognizableHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyWomen Love These Great Tips To Making Your Teeth Look WhiterHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyHere Is What Scientists Say Will Happen When You Eat AvocadosHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThe Most Obvious Sign A Guy Likes You Is When He Does ThisHerbeautyHerbeauty Science and Technology JPL-Built Instrument Aboard International Satellite to Gather Precise Atmospheric Measurements to Improve Weather Prediction By BRIAN DAY Published on Friday, September 4, 2020 | 2:06 pm Community News Subscribe STAFF REPORT First Heatwave Expected Next Week EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Top of the News The Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich spacecraft is shown undergoing tests at its manufacturer, Airbus, in Friedrichshafen, Germany, in 2019. The white JPL-designed Global Navigation Satellite System – Radio Occultation instrument can be seen attached to the upper left portion of the front of the spacecraft. (Credit: Airbus)A satellite scheduled to lift-off in November will carry a new gadget built by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory that will take precise measurements of global temperatures and humidity levels at every level of the atmosphere with the ultimate goal of improving weather forecasts, JPL announced Friday.JPL’s Global Navigation Satellite System — Radio Occultation instrument, or GNSS-RO, will hitch a ride to orbit on the Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich satellite, which is a collaboration between NASA and the European Space Agency with the primary mission of tracking global sea levels, JPL said in a written statement.“Our fundamental goal with Sentinel-6 is to measure the oceans, but the more value we can add, the better,” JPL Mission Project Scientist Josh Willis said. “It’s not every day that we get to launch a satellite, so collecting more useful data about our oceans and atmosphere is a bonus.”The GNSS-RO instrument collects its measurements by examining radio signals emanated by navigation satellites, according to JPL.“As a radio signal passes through the atmosphere, it slows, its frequency changes, and its path bends,” the statement said. “Called refraction, this effect can be used by scientists to measure minute changes in atmospheric physical properties, such as density, temperature, and moisture content.”National Weather Service meteorologists plan to use information gleaned from the instrument to improve their forecasts, and the data will also be used to help make long-term climate predictions.“Data from this mission will help track the formation of hurricanes and support models to predict the direction storms may travel,’ the JPL statement said. “The more data we gather about hurricane formation and where a storm might make landfall, the better in terms of helping local efforts to mitigate damage and support evacuation plans.”Sentinel-6 has a twin satellite, Sentinel-6B, which is expected to launch in 2025 to take over for its younger sibling.“Once in orbit, each Sentinel-6 satellite will collect sea level measurements down to the centimeter for 90% of the world’s oceans,” according to the JPL statement.More information on the efforts of NASA and JPL to study global sea levels from space is available online at sealevel.nasa.gov. Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m.center_img faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyCitizen Service CenterPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Community News STAFF REPORT Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena Make a comment CITY NEWS SERVICE/STAFF REPORT Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday More Cool Stuff 90 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Business Newslast_img read more

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Winter storm updates: Nor’easter moves in, Northeast braces for up to 2 feet of snow

first_imgABC NewsBy MAX GOLEMBO, EMILY SHAPIRO and MELISSA GRIFFIN, ABC News(NEW YORK) — A nor’easter is hitting the Northeast U.S., where it’s set to drop 1 to 2 feet of snow and possibly bring near-blizzard conditions.The treacherous conditions already claimed the lives of two people in Pennsylvania on Wednesday evening. The two died in a multivehicle accident involving 30 to 60 cars and trucks, according to the Pennsylvania State Police.At least 19 vehicles were tied up in a crash on the Henry Hudson Parkway in northern Manhattan, New York. There were six injuries in that accident, but none are considering life-threatening.“This could be the biggest storm in several years,” New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio warned.The forecast:Heavy snow is falling Wednesday night in northern New Jersey, New York City, Pennsylvania and some of southern New England.Winds could reach 50 mph in some areas, especially along the coast.Overnight, snowfall rates could reach 1 to 2 inches per hour with near blizzard conditions possible in New York, New Jersey and New England.The heaviest snow — 1 to 2 feet — will be from central Pennsylvania through New York’s Hudson Valley and Catskills, and into southern New England.The storm has led to over 750 flight cancellations.The latest:DC, PhiladelphiaSnowfall has slammed the Washington, D.C., area, but it’s expected to quickly change to a wintry mix and rain. The rain and sleet ends Wednesday night, leaving about 1 to 2 inches of snow behind.Snow is also falling in Philadelphia, but by the evening it’ll mix with sleet and rain. The city could see a total accumulation of 4 to 8 inches, while suburbs to the west and north of the city could see 1 foot or more.New JerseyIn New Jersey, where over 1 foot is possible in some areas, Gov. Phil Murphy has declared a state of emergency beginning at 2 p.m.Newark Airport reported a 2-inch-per-hour snowfall rate between 7 p.m. and 8 p.m., according to the National Weather Service. One to 2 inches per hour “are becoming common across the region,” it said.New YorkThe New York City area could see 6 to 14 inches of snow.New York City has issued a travel advisory, urging residents to stay off the roads as much as possible.Indoor dining is already banned in New York City and outdoor dining is suspended as of Wednesday afternoon, when the sanitation department’s “snow alert” went into effect. Restaurants, which are required to remove or secure outdoor furniture and remove their electric heaters, will be permitted to reopen when the “snow alert” ends.New York City is canceling in-person learning on Thursday. New York City’s snow will end around noon.BostonBoston’s snow is expected to begin around 10 or 11 p.m. on Wednesday, continuing with heavy snow overnight and reaching a total accumulation of 6 to 12 inches.Boston Public Schools will be closed Thursday as the snow is expected to continue through the day.Behind the storm, the coldest air of the season will hit the Northeast. Wind chills — what it feels like — will fall to the teens and single digits Thursday night into Friday morning.Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING (MRI) FELLOW

first_imgMD or DO degree Diversity is a source of strength, creativity, and innovation forUW-Madison. We value the contributions of each person and respectthe profound ways their identity, culture, background, experience,status, abilities, and opinion enrich the university community. Wecommit ourselves to the pursuit of excellence in teaching,research, outreach, and diversity as inextricably linkedgoals.The University of Wisconsin-Madison fulfills its public mission bycreating a welcoming and inclusive community for people from everybackground – people who as students, faculty, and staff serveWisconsin and the world.For more information on diversity and inclusion on campus, pleasevisit: Diversity andInclusion The University of Wisconsin is an Equal Opportunity andAffirmative Action Employer. We promote excellence throughdiversity and encourage all qualified individuals to apply.If you need to request an accommodation because of a disability,you can find information about how to make a request at thefollowing website: https://employeedisabilities.wisc.edu/disability-accommodation-information-for-applicants/ Wisconsin medical license. Applicant must be board certified orboard eligible. CLINICAL INSTRUCTOR(D54NN) License or Certificate: Work Type: Anticipated Begin Date: JULY 01, 2022 Contact: Department(s): Instructions to Applicants: Employment Class: Applications Open: Aug 14 2020 Central Daylight TimeApplications Close: Job Number: Christa [email protected] Access (WTRS): 7-1-1 (out-of-state: TTY: 800.947.3529, STS:800.833.7637) and above Phone number (See RELAY_SERVICE for furtherinformation. ) A539300-MEDICAL SCHOOL/RADIOLOGY/RADIOLOGY Appointment Type, Duration: The University of Wisconsin-Madison is engaged in a Title and TotalCompensation (TTC) Project to redesign job titles and compensationstructures. As a result of the TTC project, official job titles oncurrent job postings may change in Fall 2020. Job duties andresponsibilities will remain the same. For more information pleasevisit: https://hr.wisc.edu/title-and-total-compensation-study/.Employment will require a criminal background check. It will alsorequire you and your references to answer questions regardingsexual violence and sexual harassment.The University of Wisconsin System will not reveal the identitiesof applicants who request confidentiality in writing, except thatthe identity of the successful candidate will be released. See Wis.Stat. sec. 19.36(7).The Annual Security and FireSafety Report contains current campus safety and disciplinarypolicies, crime statistics for the previous 3 calendar years, andon-campus student housing fire safety policies and fire statisticsfor the previous 3 calendar years. UW-Madison will provide a papercopy upon request; please contact the University of Wisconsin PoliceDepartment .center_img This appointment has two components, including 1) advanced trainingin MRI clinical Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), and 2) providingindependent clinical services for the Department of Radiology atthe University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics.This position will always function as a trainee when performingcardiac MRI procedures. The specific duties for which you can workindependently that are not included in your training are asfollows: plain film radiography, CT scanning, ultrasound andMRI/MRA (excluding cardiac MRI) interpretation.This individual will perform the duties of a general diagnosticradiologist. These duties will include, but are not limited to,general radiology interpretation (including teleradiology),supervising and interpreting fluoroscopic examinations andultrasound, CT, MR and VC. In addition, specific responsibilitieswill be tailored to the subspecialty in which the individual willwork.The individual will often supervise and teach residents and medicalstudents. Work may be carried out at the University of WisconsinHospital and Clinics, UW Medical Foundation Clinics, MeriterHospital and/or other radiology outpatient or outreach sites andextended coverage areas as necessary.There is the possibility that this position could be extended forone additional year. Job no: 225556-ASWork type: Faculty Full or Part Time, Faculty-Full Time,Faculty-Part TimeDepartment: SMPH/RADIOLOGY/RADIOLOGYLocation: MadisonCategories: Health Care, Medical, Social Services Official Title: Terminal, 12 month appointment.This position has the possibility to be extended or converted to anongoing appointment based on need and/or funding Institutional Statement on Diversity: To apply, please go to Jobs At UW, www.jobs.wisc.edu, search forPosition Vacancy Listing # 225556 and select . You will be asked toupload a CV and a Statement of Interest including your career goalsand professional plans. You will also need to follow this linkhttps://www.radiology.wisc.edu/education/fellowships/mri-fellowship/mri-fellowship-application/to complete the other application requirements.The deadline for assuring full consideration is September 15, 2020,however positions will remain open and applications may beconsidered until the positions are filled. Full or Part Time: 50% – 100% The Department of Radiology is recruiting for radiologistsinterested in pursuing a clinical fellowship in Magnetic ResonanceImaging (MRI) beginning on July 1, 2022.The School of Medicine and Public Health has a deep and profoundcommitment to diversity both as an end in itself but, also as avaluable means for eliminating health disparities. As such, westrongly encourage applications from candidates who foster andpromote the values of diversity and inclusion. 4 years residency Salary: Position Summary: Principal Duties: NegotiableANNUAL (12 months) Academic Staff-Terminal 225556-AS Minimum Years and Type of Relevant Work Experience: Degree and Area of Specialization:last_img read more

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Weekly Market Review: September 28, 2020

first_imgWhen reduced to its simplest form, the U.S. banking industry’s business model can be described as funding long-term loans with short-term liabilities. Banks take in money as deposits from individuals, held mostly in the form of checking and saving accounts. Even though theoretically that money could all exit the bank at the end of each day, the bank confidently lends the money out as longer-term loans to individuals and businesses. Banks are paying almost nothing for those deposits today, allowing them to keep nearly all of what they are charging on the loans, but the profits derived from loans may be impacted due to COVID-19. (source: BTN Research).The outstanding debt of our nation’s government has grown from $22.6 trillion on 9/24/19 to $26.8 trillion on 9/24/20, an increase of $4.2 trillion in the last 12 months. That means over the last year, the USA’s national debt has increased by $11.4 billion per day, $475 million per hour, $7.9 million per minute, or a dire $132,000 per second. In just the 30 seconds it took you to read this paragraph, our national debt has increased by $4 million (source: Treasury Department).In an AII Investor Sentiment Survey conducted last week, 46% of investors surveyed are bearish on the expected performance of U.S. stocks over the next six months. That number is up from the historical long-term bearish average of 31% (source: American Association of Individual Investors).Notable Numbers for the Week:BANKS – 21 banks have failed in the last five years (through 9/25/20), requiring a financial bailout from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, about four failures per year. 127 banks had failed YTD through this point in calendar year 2010, i.e., YTD through 9/25/10, about three failures per week (source: FDIC).LOTS OF PEOPLE – 22% of Americans (74 million people) are on Medicaid, the nation’s health care program for low-income Americans that is jointly funded by the federal government and all 50 states (source: Medicaid).BUILDING EVERYWHERE – New residential construction in the United States totaled 139,100 housing units in July 2020, its highest monthly total since September 2006. The total includes 93,100 single family homes, 700 apartment buildings with 2-4 units and 45,300 apartment buildings with 5 or more units (source: Census Bureau).VOTING – The 2020 elections in the U.S. take place 36 days from today. On 11/03/20, Americans will vote for a president, all 435 members of the House and 33 members (out of 100) of the Senate (source: Congress).Mark R. Reimet, CFP®CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™Jodie BoothFinancial Advisorlast_img read more

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News story: Plants at the heart of the latest call for Darwin Initiative bids

first_img UN International Day for Biological Diversity celebrates the wonderful diversity of nature and wildlife around our planet. Nature delivers many environmental benefits including clean air and water, sustainable food supplies, and recovery and resilience to natural disasters. The Darwin Initiative delivers support for international nature conservation projects and many economic activities depend on nature, including agriculture, forestry, fisheries and tourism. The UK government is today (22 May) celebrating United Nations International Day of Biological Diversity by making funding available to protect wildlife across the globe.The theme for this year is ‘our biodiversity, our food, our health’. It comes as the Darwin Initiative re-opens for new projects to apply for funding in the latest round.Since 1992, the fund has been putting an emphasis on nature and health, and providing security of food supply to rural communities in some of the most remote parts of the globe – supporting the Sustainable Development Goals on protecting and enhancing nature.The Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund, which now accepts bids from projects aimed at combating the illegal trade in plants in addition to animal-focused projects, is also looking to back new schemes. This fund has received the support of £6 million of UK Aid over the next five years to make sure that more vital projects can go ahead.Recent reports on international nature have put the issue of species loss high on the nation’s agenda. The UN’s Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services report showed nearly a million species are in danger of extinction and the Darwin Initiative is part of the UK government’s response to this emerging issue.The latest round of funding comes during the government’s Year of Green Action, a year-long drive to help people to connect with, protect and enhance nature.Environment Minister Thérèse Coffey said: Fisheries protection in the PhilippinesThe Darwin Initiative has supported two projects with a total of nearly £800,000 both aimed at better protecting important coastal habitats in the Philippines and making sure that local communities have access to sustainable fisheries.Marine protected areas (MPAs) are a key tool for sustaining marine biodiversity and fish stocks. Twenty-five per cent of the world’s MPAs are in the Philippines, 95% of which are community based.However, the average size of the critical no-take “replenishment” zones within these MPAs is only 12 hectares, which is inadequate to fulfil conservation objectives, and only 12% were rated as sustained at the last assessment, owing to an overdependence on philanthropic funding.Small and unsustainable MPAs are driven by a lack of adequate business models underpinning these conservation measures. As a result, marginalised fishing communities faced with the need to feed their families today cannot afford to set aside large enough areas in the hope that they will generate increased fish catches in the future. Additionally, MPAs have traditionally focused on coral reefs and have failed to incorporate other critical habitats.ZSL’s (Zoological Society of London) Net-Works initiative has been pioneering the iMPA – which describes the “ideal MPA”, but also interpreted as innovative, inclusive, improved. These are bigger in size, better managed and enforced and sustainably financed using the Net-Works business model.Dr Nick Hill, Senior Technical Specialist at ZSL, said: Projects supported by the Darwin Initiative are illustrative of a ‘win-win’ approach, encouraging sustainable livelihoods whilst conserving some of the world’s iconic and endangered species and landscapes, which benefits us all. This official status is vital in Guinea. Habitat loss has been devastating with calculations that 96% of the country’s original forest has already been cleared, and that which remains is under severe pressure. It looks like as many as 35 species have gone extinct in Guinea, from trees to minute herbs, daisies, peas and clematis, all due to human pressures. Twenty-five of these are globally unique to Guinea. So these are likely global extinctions. Darwin Initiative funding for the first two iMPAs has gained the support of local government. These two MPAs are nearly 50 times the average size of MPAs in the Philippines, with no-take replenishment zones 16 times bigger. This is a key milestone for ZSL’s project and proves that in the Philippines larger community-based MPAs make a meaningful contribution towards the Philippines’ nationally-mandated target of protecting 15% of municipal waters. At the start of May, 32 new projects shared £8.2million in the 25th round of funding from the Darwin Initiative.There has been continuous progress made by ongoing schemes backed by the Darwin Initiative, with two highlights in Guinea and the Philippines.Tropical Important Plant Areas in GuineaFollowing three years of research, European and Guinean scientists, NGOs and staff of the Guinean Ministry of Environment, Waters and Forests, have evidenced 22 Tropical Important Plant Areas in Guinea. These are the first Tropical Important Plant Areas (TIPAs) that have been identified in Africa.This designation of the 22 TIPAs, which cover 3.5% of Guinea’s surface area and include more than 60% of 273 threatened species identified in the country, mean those plants will now stand a far greater chance of protection.Darwin Initiative support of nearly £300,000 over three years has helped to make sure this work takes place.Dr Martin Cheek, Senior Research Leader at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, said:last_img read more

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Clearing the air

first_imgThis is one in a series of profiles showcasing some of Harvard’s stellar graduates.Asked about her new job as a health communications specialist for the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, Alicia Nelson, M.P.H. ’20, hesitated.“I was hired to do substance abuse messaging,” she said after a moment. “Then COVID happened.”Nelson started work at the consortium — a nonprofit aimed at addressing the health needs of Alaska Native and American Indian people — in late January, after earning a degree in health policy from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health’s M.P.H.-65 program. Now she’s working in the organization’s so-called “situation unit,” a team that helps manage the response to the fast-moving pandemic.Nelson said that her Harvard Chan School training in risk communication is proving invaluable. “Before coming to Harvard Chan School, I didn’t know there was a science to it,” she said. “But when it comes to COVID, setting up the right dialogue between experts and the community saves lives.”Skill buildingAfter majoring in sociology with a minor in public health at the University of Minnesota, Nelson accompanied her husband, a naval submarine officer, to various duty stations, including Kings Bay, Ga. Through the National Health Corps Florida, an AmeriCorps program, she completed a service term at a substance abuse clinic with a caseload of pregnant and postpartum women. She did her best to translate scientific literature into a recovery curriculum, but she wasn’t sure she fully understood what she was reading. “I needed more skills to do right by my clients,” she said. She decided to seek a master’s degree, and chose Harvard Chan School because she was impressed with the School’s rigorous quantitative training and its strong global network.She struggled through courses such as statistics and decision science, but now says she’s grateful for the training. “The quality of education I got at the School prepared me to participate in very high-level discussions on COVID response,” she said.,A problem that was personalA high point of Nelson’s Harvard Chan School education was her summer 2019 practicum, which gave her a chance to work on an issue that hit close to home. The practicum came about by accident. In late 2018, Nelson flew home to Alaska for winter break to find the outdoor temperature in the usual subzero range. However, the indoor temperature in her home was unusually and uncomfortably cold. Nelson’s family had stopped heating the house after they received a letter from state officials telling them that, because of poor air quality in the area where they lived — a town called North Pole, near Fairbanks — they were risking a fine of $1,000 for using their woodstove during a four-day “burn ban.” These are bans on using solid fuel-burning devices, such as woodstoves, and they’re issued intermittently each winter in the Fairbanks area depending on air quality forecasts. State officials knew that Nelson’s family had been burning wood during the ban because an air quality official had driven by and taken a picture of their chimney.Although many homes can also be heated by fuel oil, this option is often much more expensive than using a woodstove, Nelson said.Distressed that the burn ban would not expire until 2 p.m. on Christmas Eve, Nelson reached out to local community members to learn more. She was aware that air quality was a public health issue, but she also knew that burning wood or coal was how many people in North Pole and the surrounding region heated their homes and businesses.“Fairbanks is one of the most polluted cities in the nation in terms of fine particulate matter,” she said. “Between the temperature inversion, wood-burning stoves in the winter, and wildfires in the summer, Interior Alaska struggles with air quality year-round.” Nelson wondered if there was a way she could fashion a practicum aimed at bridging the divide between Alaskans accustomed to heating with wood or coal, and state and federal environmental officials who were trying to keep air pollution within federal limits. She wanted to help people in the community understand the serious health impacts of air pollution and to suggest alternative heating methods. But she also wanted government officials to be more thoughtful in how they communicated with people about air quality laws and regulations. “Fairbanks is one of the most polluted cities in the nation in terms of fine particulate matter. Between the temperature inversion, wood-burning stoves in the winter, and wildfires in the summer, Interior Alaska struggles with air quality year-round.” — Alicia Nelson, M.P.H. ’20 She hosted a “public comment” party — “it was sort of like a science fair,” she said — at the North Pole public library to share easy-to-digest information about federal air quality regulations, and to encourage residents to share written comments about them to the EPA. Nelson was thrilled that more than 30 people submitted comments, which prompted coverage in the local paper. “It was possibly the most rewarding day of the entire summer,” she said.Support from the Rose Fellowship also enabled Nelson to travel to Reykjavik, Iceland, in October 2019 to present her practicum work at the Arctic Circle Assembly, an annual event where representatives from governments, corporations, nonprofits, universities, think tanks, environmental groups, indigenous communities, and others discuss the future of the Arctic. “That’s one of the reasons I went to Harvard — because it provides a platform to connect with people all over the world,” she said.‘The right spot’The Fairbanks-area air quality issue is ongoing. “I didn’t change the tide of anything,” Nelson admits. “But I may have convinced some people to think about the ways they heat their homes. Some of my friends and family filled out applications for the woodstove change-out program, which offers people reimbursements for replacing their woodstoves. My mother-in-law even went with me to look at propane tanks. I consider that a victory!”Nelson is grateful that she finished her studies at Harvard Chan School before COVID-19 hit in full force, for how well the School prepared her, and for her current role. Recent projects have included compiling a document for tribal health leaders with clinical data on how COVID-19 is impacting Alaska Native patients, as well as a messaging campaign to promote diagnostic and antibody testing.“It’s extremely rewarding to use my education at home in Alaska,” she said. “I wish COVID wasn’t happening. But I never feel like my training and skill set aren’t useful here. I’m exactly where I should be.” “Alicia is really passionate about building connections and understanding through civil engagement and civil dialogue,” said Nancy Turnbull, senior lecturer on health policy and senior associate dean for professional education, who was Nelson’s adviser. With Turnbull’s encouragement, Nelson applied for and received a Rose Traveling Fellowship to support a practicum in Alaska. Funded by a gift from Deborah Rose, S.M. ’75, the Rose Fellowships supports students and postdoctoral fellows at Harvard Chan School to travel in the U.S. or abroad for internships, research, or other academic projects.During her practicum, Nelson worked with a team from the Fairbanks North Star Borough’s Division of Air Quality. She learned everything she could about the impact of PM2.5 pollution on health and the local economics of the air quality issue. Over the course of the summer she met with state and federal officials, as well as other stakeholders, such as local electricity suppliers, people from local hospitals and universities, and small business owners. Some of her meetings were so-called “Alaska formal” — very casual — occurring over activities like fly fishing or digging septic lines.She worked on developing a communications strategy to disseminate information about the local PM2.5 health burden. “I wanted to translate information about air quality in a way that my family could understand,” she said. “Not everyone in North Pole, Alaska, wants to look at the 2,000-page State Air Quality Control Plan.” “I didn’t change the tide of anything. But I may have convinced some people to think about the ways they heat their homes.” — Alicia Nelsonlast_img read more

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Red Cross: 32 killed in motor accident in remote Uganda

first_imgKAMPALA, Uganda (AP) — The Red Cross in Uganda says 32 bodies have been recovered from the scene of an accident involving five vehicles. The accident occurred Tuesday night in a remote district in the East African country’s western region. The local Daily Monitor newspaper reports that the accident occurred when a speeding truck rammed another vehicle on a section of the road that is being resurfaced. Other motorists ploughed into the wreckage. Lethal traffic accidents frequently happen in the region, where roads are often narrow and potholed.last_img

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Tom Bateman & Lucy Briggs-Owen to Headline Shakespeare in Love

first_img The movie, penned by Marc Norman and Tom Stoppard and directed by John Madden, Shakespeare in Love won seven Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Original Score, Best Original Screenplay, Best Actress for Gwyneth Paltrow and Best Supporting Actress for Judi Dench. The film also starred Joseph Fiennes, Geoffrey Rush and Tom Wilkinson. Bateman’s stage credits include The Duchess of Malfi, Much Ado About Nothing, The Lion in Winter and Lizzie Siddal. He’s appeared on TV in Da Vinci’s Demons and The Tunnel. Briggs-Owen’s stage credits include Boris Godunuv, The Orphan of Zhao, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Cardenio,  The City Madam, Noises Off, The Way of the World, Mrs. Warren’s Profession, Private Lives, The Importance of Being Earnest and Fortune’s Fool. View Comments Can you love a fool? Can you love a player? Can you love Tom Bateman and Lucy Briggs-Owen as the lead roles of Will Shakespeare and Viola De Lesseps in the West End’s Shakespeare in Love? Of course, you can! Adapted by Tony winner Lee Hall and directed by Olivier winner Declan Donnellan, the previously announced production will begin previews at London’s Noel Coward Theatre on July 2. Opening night is set for July 23. Additional casting will be announced soon. Set in London during the late 16th century, Shakespeare in Love centers on young playwright William Shakespeare, who is struggling with his latest work Romeo and Ethel the Pirate’s Daughter. A great fan of Shakespeare’s plays is young, wealthy Viola who is about to be married to the cold-hearted Lord Wessex, but constantly dreams of becoming an actress. Women were not allowed to act on stage at that time, but, dressed up as a boy, Viola successfully auditions for the part of Romeo. Soon she and William are caught in a forbidden romance that provides rich inspiration for his play.last_img read more

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