Florida Autism Center serves Apopka families

first_img Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 Lauren Mackey is a staff writer for The Apopka Voice and a high school senior from Apopka. She plans to pursue a degree in Culture and Media this fall to work toward a career in journalism with a focus on social change. The Anatomy of Fear Please enter your name here Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate center_img By Lauren Mackey / TAV Staff WriterThe Florida Autism Center has a unique goal: For their students to leave their programs.Founded in 2005, the Florida Autism Center serves families with children younger than 6-years-old to 13-years-old who have autism, down’s syndrome or may benefit from ABA therapy.According to Jenn Elston, Marketing Director at the Florida Autism Center, ABA, or Applied Behavior Analysis, therapy is, “a hard science dedicated to making significant social change,” she said, “The field has a strong history of being the only scientifically validated treatment for autism and related disabilities.”The center provides early intervention, one-on-one ABA therapy, private school and summer therapy at 11 locations throughout Florida. Their Apopka location on Hunt Club Boulevard opened in January, although they plan to have their grand opening once they have about 15 families at the location.“ABA therapy is a relatively new practice, so we’re really proud that we’re able to actually go out in the community and serve the Apopka community itself,” said Elston.Elston explained that they have a strong belief in their center-based ABA therapy because it prepares kids for mainstream kindergarten by mimicking a school environment. She added that being in the Apopka community allows therapists at the center to go into the community with a child who may have an issue going to the dentist or the grocery store, and find the cause of the issue, then imitate that environment in-center to find a solution.“The whole community has just been so welcoming. We’ve had multiple businesses reach out and ask us if they can host their brochures for us, all of that, so it’s been wonderful to be a part of your guys’ community,” said Elston.The organization is rapidly expanding, with eight new locations coming soon.To learn more about the Florida Autism Center, their services and funding, visit their website or call 866-610-0580. Please enter your comment! LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply TAGSAutismFlorida Autism Center Previous articleNew island-inspired restaurant to open in MayNext articleApopka business networking group celebrates two-year anniversary Lauren Mackey RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

Read More →

Reporter narrowly survives targeted shooting in northern India

first_img News News IndiaAsia – Pacific Protecting journalists Organized crimeViolence News Follow the news on India “We call on Bihar’s chief minister to do everything possible to ensure that this crime does not go unpunished,” said Daniel Bastard, the head of RSF’s Asia-Pacific desk. “In view of the considerable dangers to which investigative reporters are exposed in the field, we call on the Indian authorities to consider creating a mechanism for protecting journalists.” August 1, 2019 – Updated on September 2, 2019 Reporter narrowly survives targeted shooting in northern India Organisation News RSF_en RSF has learned that his Dainik Jagran colleagues are convinced that the shooting was a direct consequence of the story that Mandal recently wrote about the two traffickers, for whom the Madhubani district police have now issued an arrest warrant. A reporter for the newspaper Dainik Jagran, Pradeep Mandal is still in intensive care after being shot twice by two men on a motorcycle on the evening of 28 July in connection with his coverage of alcohol trafficking. He could have died if he had not been rescued by passers-by.While being taken to the hospital, Mandal named his attackers as two men who were released on bail last week after being charged with trafficking in alcohol. India is ranked 140th out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2019 World Press Freedom Index. In rural India, journalists face choice between covering pandemic and survival Help by sharing this information RSF demands release of detained Indian journalist Siddique Kappan, hospitalised with Covid-19 to go further Reporters Without Borders (RSF) condemns the latest armed attack against a journalist in India – a reporter who was badly injured in a targeted shooting in Madhubani district, in the eastern state of Bihar – and calls on the authorities to do everything possible to find those responsible. Receive email alerts June 10, 2021 Find out more IndiaAsia – Pacific Protecting journalists Organized crimeViolence March 3, 2021 Find out more At the borders of Bihar, an Indian state where alcohol is banned, customs agents often check vehicles for alcohol traces, as here on 20 August 2017. Pradeep Mandal had been investigating trafficking in alcohol (photo: Sajjad Hussai/: AFP). India: RSF denounces “systemic repression” of Manipur’s media April 27, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

Read More →

Limerick man used facebook to groom teenager for sexual assault

first_imgby Andrew [email protected] up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up A COUNTY Limerick man used Facebook to a groom a 13-year-old girl for two weeks before he sexually assaulted her at a derelict house, Limerick Circuit Court has heard.Three years ago, Lee Carey (21) of Sycamore Heights, Patrickswell posed as an older man on the facebook site where he befriended the young girl.He adopted the alter ego of 36-year-old Nigel O’Dea and developed extensive contact with the girl through the site, exchanging “messages of a sexual nature”.Garda Tracey Corcoran said that the matters came to light when the girl’s mother met her daughter walking home after she met Carey in the derelict house.The mother became suspicious of her daughter’s movements on May 12, 2011 when she said she was going to meet a friend.  She dispatched her partner and eldest son to trace her daughter’s whereabouts.Half an hour after meeting Carey, the young girl reappeared and admitted that she had met him and they had kissed and held each other. They parted ways after Carey received a text from his girlfriend and the girl received a phone call from her mother.Lee Carey was seen by the girl’s mother emerging from the derelict house. A short time later, she put the allegation to Carey’s father who said he knew nothing about it.Gardaí subsequently uncovered two weeks of exchanged messages between the user “Nigel O’Dea” and the young girl. Carey subsequently changed the user profile name to Nigel O’Connor.In September 2011, Lee Carey made full admissions to gardai of his involvement before any complaint was made to Gardaí.An official complaint was made by the young girl over 11 months after the incident and Garda Corcoran told the court that the victim she didn’t want to speak about it and described as a “negative statement”.The court heard explicit details of the messages sent to the young girl and the conversations of a sexual nature that she was invited to respond to.He asked the girl if he should bring a condom to the meeting and while there, he twice asked if he could he could engage in digital penetration.On September 26 last year, Lee Carey, now 24, pleaded guilty to the sexual exploitation of a child by inviting them to engage in a sexual act on dates between April 29, 2011 and May 12, 2011 and to sexually assaulting the 13 year old girl on May 12, 2011.Defence counsel, Mark Nicholas told the court that his client had “since married a long-term girlfriend on full disclosure basis”.He said that Mr Carey was very remorseful over his “utter lunacy and bad judgement”. and was prepared to take any step possible to address this.Judge Carroll Moran said the defendant’s actions amounted to a “grooming process of a very young girl”. He praised her mother for being “alive and aware” as to what was possibly going on.“Who knows what would have happened had her mother not put a stop to it”, Judge Moran added.Imposing a three year prison sentence, Judge Carroll Moran said that he would suspend it given the positive report before the court which presented Lee Carey as a of a “low risk to children”, but placed his name on the register for sex offenders for five years. Facebook Emma Langford shortlisted for RTE Folk Award and playing a LIVE SHOW!!! this Saturday Advertisement Email NewsCrime & CourtLimerick man used facebook to groom teenager for sexual assaultBy Staff Reporter – February 14, 2014 1927 RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Celebrating a ground breaking year in music from Limerick No vaccines in Limerick yet Walk in Covid testing available in Limerick from Saturday 10th April center_img WhatsApp Print TAGSfacebookfeaturedgroomingMusic Limerick Twitter #HearThis: New music and video from Limerick rapper Strange Boy #SaucySoul: Room 58 – ‘Hate To See You Leave’ Linkedin Previous articleThe AftermathNext articleLimerick Fire Service responds to 220 emergency incidents Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie last_img read more

Read More →

HSE seeking Public Private Partnership to develop new Health Centre in Dunfanaghy

first_img Nine Til Noon Show – Listen back to Wednesday’s Programme Three factors driving Donegal housing market – Robinson Facebook Calls for maternity restrictions to be lifted at LUH By admin – November 22, 2016 WhatsApp Pinterest WhatsApp Previous articleUse community hospitals to alleviate overcrowding crisis – Mc GowanNext articleMan arrested in Derry in connection with dissident republican activity admin Google+ Twitter GAA decision not sitting well with Donegal – Mick McGrath center_img Google+ HSE seeking Public Private Partnership to develop new Health Centre in Dunfanaghy RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR LUH system challenged by however, work to reduce risk to patients ongoing – Dr Hamilton Twitter Pinterest Homepage BannerNews The HSE has confirmed it wants to enter into a Public Private Partnership agreement for the construction of a new Health Centre in Dunfanaghy.In a letter to local public representatives this week, the HSE confirms that following a meeting with the G.P, it is intended to remain in the existing Health Centre in the short term, and the Public Private Partnership will be advertised in the coming weeks.Cllr Seamus O’Domhnaill is welcoming the confirmation……….Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/sodunfanaghy.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Guidelines for reopening of hospitality sector published Facebooklast_img read more

Read More →

moe. Announces Two-Night 2018 New Year’s Eve Run

first_imgToday, moe. has announced that the band will ring in 2019 with a two-night stand at Rochester, New York’s Kodak Center. Slated for December 30th and 31st, the upcoming New Year’s Eve run marks the first time the group will return to the New York area following last weekend’s successful two-night run in Utica. A limited number of pre-sale tickets for moe.’s upcoming New Year’s Eve run go on sale on Tuesday, September 18th, at 10 a.m. (ET) here. Tickets for the general public go on sale on Friday, September 21st, at 10 a.m. (ET). For more information, head to moe.’s website here.In mid-October, moe. will embark on a short run across the West Coast and Midwest. The band will work its way down Washington and Oregon, moving through Montana, North Dakota, Minnesota, and Wisconsin before landing in Chicago for a three-night run at Thalia Hall. For Halloween, from October 25th to 27th, the band will tour through Cincinnati, Charlottesville, and Philadelphia. The show at Philadelphia’s The Fillmore on October 27th will serve as moe.’s highly anticipated Halloween celebration and take on a “A Night At The Arcade” video game theme. For more information or tickets, head here.At the end of November, moe. will again hit the road, with another mini-tour spanning from November 28th to December 9th. For this leg, the band is focusing on the southern half of the United States with a four-night run across Florida in addition to appearances in South Carolina, North Carolina, Alabama, and Georgia. The group will also host moe.’s tropical throe.down in January 2019, which will also feature performances by The New Mastersounds, BIG Something, and DJ Logic.last_img read more

Read More →

Study: Doctor burnout costs health care system $4.6 billion a year

first_img Shorter shifts lead to better-rested doctors Burnout among doctors is costing the U.S. health-care system an estimated $4.6 billion a year in billings because of reduced hours, physician turnover, and expenses associated with finding and hiring replacements, according to a first-time analysis of the overall economic impact of the problem.That figure, calculated by an international team of researchers led by Harvard Business School visiting scholar Joel Goh, is likely an underestimate, researchers said, because it doesn’t include the costs of burnout’s potentially significant downstream effects, such as increased medical errors, patient dissatisfaction, increased malpractice lawsuits, and the impact on other staff who must pick up the slack.“What’s interesting is the magnitude of the effect, which is substantial,” said Goh, senior author of a paper published recently in the Annals of Internal Medicine. “It draws our attention to the fact that this is a problem worth looking at.”Physician burnout has long been recognized as a significant problem. According to a survey of nearly 7,000 doctors published in 2015, 54 percent reported at least one of three symptoms of burnout: emotional exhaustion, feelings of cynicism and detachment from work, and a sense of low personal accomplishment.That rate is roughly double that of the general population. Burnout among doctors has been associated with higher rates of medical errors, worse clinical outcomes for patients, increased absenteeism, and a rise in doctors wanting to reduce their work hours or leave the field entirely.Goh became interested in the subject through his prior work on job stress. He said that in the past burnout among America’s doctors has largely been examined through an ethical, instead of an economic, lens. The new numbers, he said, show that it’s not just a problem affecting physicians’ happiness but one that has enough impact on the bottom line that it probably makes financial sense to invest in addressing it.“Our study was not an intervention study,” Goh said, “but these numbers suggest [addressing the problem] is probably a good idea.”The analysis was conducted by a team from HBS, the National University of Singapore, where Goh is an assistant professor, Stanford University, the American Medical Association, Atrius Health in Boston, the Mayo Clinic, and the University of North Carolina Physicians Network. Beginning in 2017, researchers first constructed a mathematical model and then fed it data from existing studies to come up with their economic analysis.The $4.6 billion annual estimate is the midpoint in a range of $2.6 billion to $6.3 billion nationwide. The researchers conducted a similar analysis to find the cost of burnout per physician and found costs of about $7,600 per doctor, with a range of $3,700 to $11,000.“To me, the punch line is that this stuff matters,” Goh said. “There’s been a growing awareness of physician burnout … But as a health care executive, when you’re trying to make a decision you want all the evidence, all the data, in front of you. And if you’re trying to quantify the dollars and cents, addressing this may be worthwhile even from a business point of view.” Related Spare the medical resident and spoil nothing Capping hours at 80 per week does not seem to hurt quality of care provided by doctors-in-training The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news. Calculator shows hidden costs of fatigued workforce Sleep deficiency in the U.S. estimated at 70 percent, with $410 billion price tag Senior resident physicians who don’t work extended hours get 8 percent more sleep last_img read more

Read More →

Journalist Francie Diep discusses confronting her cyberbully

first_imgWhile technology is an ever-changing force, human emotions have always remained constant, journalist Francie Diep said when she visited Saint Mary’s on Thursday to share her experiences with cyber bullying as a teenager. A staff writer at The Pacific Standard living in Washington, D.C., Diep grew up in Washington state as the daughter of Vietnamese immigrants. Diep was working as a freelance writer in New York City when she decided to stray from her field of scientific writing and submit a personal piece to The Atlantic.On Sept. 30, 2014, The Atlantic published Diep’s article titled “Confronting My Cyberbully, 13 Years Later,” in which she detailed the three years of online harassment at the hands of a former friend. Diep said she met Amanda, her very real but fictionally named cyberbully, in the early years of middle school.“I was totally enthralled by Amanda,” Diep said. “We met our very first day of junior high. We were both 12-years-old, so that liminal age between when you’re a kid and when you start to become more interested in more grown up things.”Amanda was followed by a loyal band of girlfriends, who Diep said wore makeup, styled their hair and spent time loitering at the local mall.“I quickly became friends with them. Amanda and I in particular became close very quickly,” Diep said. “We would talk for hours on the phone after school.”The friendship lasted for about a year and a half before Amanda and the other girls decided it was time to exclude Diep from their group.“They all got on the phone and called me on my parents’ landline to tell me this,” Diep said. “Admittedly, I had a pretty dorky reputation in school, despite Amanda and her friends’ glamor.”This was Amanda’s modus operandi, Diep said, having already witnessed Amanda and her friends kick another girl out of the circle for threatening the group’s “cool” reputation.“We were all sitting [at lunch] and all of a sudden, Amanda started talking really loudly, saying, ‘I just can’t believe people who can’t take a hint. You don’t even like them, and they still follow you around like a dog,’” Diep said. “This girl started sobbing next to us. She was sitting right there and none of us said anything. I personally felt relieved that Amanda was willing to do this so that she wouldn’t hang out with us anymore … turned out Amanda was willing to do that to me, too.”In the following weeks, Diep said the group ran a campaign to make her unhappy at school, giving her the silent treatment while they pretended to whisper about her in the hallway. The bullying followed Diep home after Amanda found a way to access her Yahoo email account.“We were so close that she knew my password and she knew the answer to my security question, which was an inside joke between us,” Diep said. “She would sign in, delete all my emails and leave one mean note for me.”Diep said she began to develop a physical response to logging into her own email account, the anxiety of discovering a new message making her heart race and her hands shake. She would read Amanda’s notes, then quickly delete them.“One thing I really wish I’d done is save those emails and taken screenshots,” Diep said. “It’s hard to do in the moment because you’re reacting and it’s really freaky and you’re emotional, but if this ever happens to you, save screenshots. That’s the most powerful thing you can do to make sure this doesn’t happen again to you and to make sure that the person who does this will see some kind of consequences. But I didn’t.”Diep didn’t tell her parents about the abuse, and said she refused to change her email address because she did not want to allow Amanda to “win” by forcing her out of her own account.“I carried this with me for so many years,” she said. “Maybe if I just changed my email, I would have been less affected by it.”Amanda grew more creative, Diep said, accessing her calendar and setting threatening reminders.  These notifications, worded in first person and often set at midnight, reminded Diep of “her own plans” to kill herself.“I would feel totally alone reading this,” Diep said. “Another really weird thing about this was that it made me feel like Amanda was in my head.”After three years, Diep said the emails and reminders started to slow down. She applied to colleges out of state, and was accepted by UCLA.“Fast forward ten years: I’m in New York, I’m in my mid-twenties, I’m a free-lance writer,” Diep said. “This is my dream. This is what I’ve always wanted to do. Ever since I was a little girl, I knew I wanted to be a writer.”Despite living out her childhood dreams as a journalist in New York, Diep said the introduction of Facebook made Amanda’s online presence a permanent and prominent fixture in her life. She said she would scroll through Amanda’s photos, following her life almost obsessively, watching her get married, have kids and move to the suburbs.“I didn’t feel good about looking at these pictures,” Diep said. “It had been so long, I just wanted to get over it. So I started telling some of my friends what had happened to me.”Her friends, mostly writers and producers themselves, encouraged Diep to take her experiences public.“I started turning the idea over in my mind,” Diep said. “Coincidentally, The Atlantic put out a call for itches about stories about how technology affected your life personally.”After The Atlantic accepted Diep’s pitch, she set about contacting Amanda.“I wanted to get as much out of her, what she was thinking, why she did this, as much insight as possible,” Diep said. “So I started messaging her through Facebook. Turns out, I was still scared of Amanda. I would get the same freaked out … feeling every time I messaged her. I started to hate the Facebook pop.”Diep said it took a long time for Amanda to open up about the cyberbullying, and though she apologized, gave little to no explanation for her actions other than the pettiness of adolescent girls.“I tried really hard to put myself in the headspace of my thirteen-year-old self when I wrote this story,” Diep said. “I tried to recreate the feelings for the reader, and I tried to tell painful truths plainly.”The story was published, and Diep said she received complimentary emails from editors inviting her to contribute to different publications, as well as a surprising feeling of closure.“An unexpected result of this was that I stopped wanting to check Amanda’s pictures,” Diep said. “It was amazing. I haven’t checked them since I wrote that story. I felt really free after I wrote that story, and I didn’t know how trapped I felt until I wrote that story. It was an incredible experience.”Tags: cyberbullying, Francie Diep, The Atlantic, The Pacific Standardlast_img read more

Read More →

Citizenship loans change members’ lives

first_img 5SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr In 2015, Matanuska Valley Federal Credit Union in Palmer, Alaska, offered a promotion on signature loans at its Waipahu, Hawaii, branch office.It turned into way to help people become U.S. citizens.A segment of the credit union’s membership is composed of immigrants from Micronesia and the Philippines who petition for citizenship.The signature loans were offered up to $7,500—roughly the cost of citizenship—at terms up to 48 months.“Our normal terms for signature loans is 36 months but we wanted the payment to be a little more reasonable so we extended it to 48 months,” says Jaccie Gaines, consumer lending manager for the $430 million asset credit union.Rates on the loans were tiered, starting at an annual percentage rate of 6.99%. continue reading »last_img read more

Read More →

Former MCU board members sue New York regulator

first_img 2SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading » Former volunteers of the $2.9 billion Municipal Credit Union in New York are suing the state regulator to get their board seats back.After former MCU President/CEO Kam Wong was accused of allegedly stealing millions and fired by the board in June, the New York State Department of Financial Services removed the entire board for failing to discharge their duties and for accepting compensation, which is prohibited in the Empire State.Spokespersons for the NYSDFS and MCU declined comment.A former board member who spoke to CU Times on the condition of anonymity argued the board performed their duties, pointing out that volunteers relied on financial reports from six different layers of the credit union’s management, and information from state and federal examinations, that did not detect Wong’s alleged fraud.last_img read more

Read More →

Vestal Rotary makes donations

first_img“In these unprecedented times, we recognize the need to support our community. Supporting our community is a core value of Rotary”. “In times like these, everyone is called on to come together and support one another. More people need assistance right now. This has created an emergent situation for our local community and we wanted to help.” VESTAL (WBNG)- The Rotary Club of Vestal has announced that they made over $10,000 in donations to assist local organizations during the coronavirus crisis. They said that without the support of the community they wouldn’t have been able to make this possible. $5,000 donation to Western Broome Meals on Wheels$2,500 donation to COVID-19 Community Response Fund$2,000 donation to CHOW$1,000 donation to California Grill to help fund the meals that they are providing to seniorscenter_img In a press release they said, they donated a total of $10,500 to the following, In a statement from the club’s president Siobhan Davey, they said,last_img read more

Read More →