Neel Lane appointed Episcopal Relief & Development board chair

first_img People Posted Nov 4, 2015 Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Martinsville, VA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Tampa, FL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit a Job Listing Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Washington, DC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Course Director Jerusalem, Israel This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC [Episcopal Relief & Development press release] Daniel McNeel ‘Neel’ Lane, Jr. has been appointed the new chair of Episcopal Relief & Development’s Board of Directors, effective Nov. 1.  The appointment was made by the Most Rev. Michael B. Curry, newly installed presiding bishop of The Episcopal Church, who transitions to the position of honorary chair.  Lane has served on Episcopal Relief & Development’s board since 2011, and has chaired the Governance committee since 2012.“I am inspired by Neel’s commitment to strengthening Episcopal Relief & Development and equipping the organization’s staff and partners for deeper ministry,” said Curry. “I look forward to continuing our service on the board together in our new capacities, as we strive to envision how the organization is called to faithfully partner with communities around the world to leverage their unique gifts to fight poverty and disease.”Lane is a partner at the law firm of Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP and Partner in Charge of the San Antonio office. His pro bono work focuses on social issues, notably including the federal lawsuit that resulted in marriage equality for all Texans, as well as cases challenging death sentences on constitutional grounds. He has also advocated and testified before the Texas Legislature in support of legislation limiting predatory payday lending practices and establishing needle exchange programs. Lane has been named as one of three finalists for “Lawyer of the Year” by Texas Lawyer, has been named an Outstanding Lawyer for 2015 by the San Antonio Business Journal, and has been named one of the Best Lawyers in America for each of the past seven years in a row.In addition to his involvement with Episcopal Relief & Development, Lane has also chaired the board of Good Samaritan Community Services, an agency of the Episcopal Diocese of West Texas, and served on the board of Texas Appleseed, an agency that promotes social and economic justice for all Texans.“In his work and through his involvement with Episcopal Church and local organizations, Neel has distinguished himself in service to those who are marginalized, whose rights are ignored or whose dignity is not upheld and respected,” said Rob Radtke, president of Episcopal Relief & Development. “His passion for justice and compassion for others make him an invaluable member of our Board of Directors, and his leadership and expertise will make him an outstanding chair.”Based in San Antonio, Lane earned his BA in 1984 from Columbia University and his JD in 1988 from the University of Texas School of Law, where he was a member of the Texas Law Review and served as Research and Notes Editor for Volume 66.  He is a member of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in San Antonio, Texas.“I am humbled and honored to be asked to serve in this role, for an organization that truly goes beyond the end of the road to empower people all over the world to improve their own lives,” Lane said.  “Episcopal Relief & Development is already a wonderful organization, staffed by top-level professionals, and supported by generous and faithful donors.  I will use whatever gifts I have been blessed with to help Episcopal Relief & Development become an even more powerful instrument of God’s love.”Episcopal Relief & Development works with more than 3 million people in nearly 40 countries worldwide to overcome poverty, hunger and disease through multi-sector programs that utilize local resources and expertise. An independent 501(c)(3) organization, Episcopal Relief & Development works closely with Anglican Communion and ecumenical partners to help communities rebuild after disasters and develop long-term strategies to create a thriving future. In 2015, the organization joins Episcopalians and friends in celebrating 75 Years of Healing a Hurting World.center_img Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Press Release Service Rector Shreveport, LA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Featured Jobs & Calls Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Rector Columbus, GA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Youth Minister Lorton, VA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Belleville, IL Director of Music Morristown, NJ Tags Featured Events Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Relief & Development, Rector Albany, NY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit an Event Listing Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Hopkinsville, KY Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Neel Lane appointed Episcopal Relief & Development board chair Curate Diocese of Nebraska last_img read more

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Presiding Bishop addresses Syrian refugee crisis: ‘Be not afraid!’

first_img Refugees Migration & Resettlement Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis [Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs press release] Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop and Primate Michael B. Curry addresses the current Syrian refugee crisis:“Be not afraid!”  Often in the gospels, fear grips the people of God, and time and again, either the angels, or Our Lord himself, respond with the same words of comfort: “Be not afraid.”In times like this fear is real.   And I share that fear with you.  Our instinct tells us to be afraid. The fight-or-flight mentality takes hold.  At the present moment, many across our Church and our world are grasped by fear in response to the terrorist attacks that unfolded in Paris last Friday.  These fears are not unfounded.  We can and should support law enforcement officials who are working hard and at great risk to protect us from crime and keep us safe.   And yet, especially when we feel legitimate fear, our faith reminds us “Be not afraid.”  The larger truth is that our ultimate security comes from God in Christ.In the Book of Leviticus, God says to the people of Israel that, “the foreigner who resides with you shall be to you as the citizen among you; you shall love the foreigner as yourself, for you were foreigners in the land of Egypt.”  Accordingly, we welcome the stranger.  We love our neighbor.  The Episcopal Church has long been committed to resettling refugees in our own communities fleeing violence and persecution.The Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society, through its Episcopal Migration Ministries service, works with dioceses and congregations, and the United States government, to settle refugees in communities across this great country.  The Episcopal Church has been engaged in this ministry for more than 75 years.  We will not let the nightmare this world often is keep us from carrying out the words of Jesus who told us to be a neighbor to those in need.Refugees from places like Syria seek to escape the precise same ideological and religious extremism that gave birth to the attacks in Paris.  They seek entry into our communities because their lives are imprisoned by daily fear for their existence.   Just as Jesus bids us not to be afraid, we must, in turn, pass those words of comfort to those who turn to us for help.But Jesus calls us to go even further: not just to love our neighbors and our kin, but to love our enemies.  This is particularly difficult when we are afraid.    But even in the midst of our fear we stand on the solid ground of our faith and proclaim the faith in Christ crucified and risen from the dead.  In practical terms, this may mean finding strength in prayer, or in our neighbors, or in our churches, or in acts of solidarity with others who live in fear.   This is the hope that casts out fear.The fear is real.  So we pray.  We go to church.  We remember who we are in Jesus.   Our resurrection hope is larger than fear.   Let nothing keep us from that hope, that faith, that security in Gods dream for all of humanity.“Be not afraid!”The Most Rev. Michael B. CurryPresiding Bishop and PrimateThe Episcopal ChurchResourcesThe following resources are offered for education and understanding of the Syrian refugee crisis.• Episcopal Public Policy Network has posted an overview and a call to action here• Two live webinars have been slated for November 19 and November 23.  Information is here. Tags Rector Albany, NY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Richard McClellan says: Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Martinsville, VA Submit a Press Release November 19, 2015 at 9:54 pm Dear Friends, fear is a valid and normal reaction, associated with our instinct to survive. The call of the Gospel Life is to live above giving into our knee jerk reaction, at the risk of our own lives. Several thousand Christians have been martyred this year, rather then rejecting Jesus and the Gospel Life we are called to in Baptism. We Christians here in America have had it so easy for so long we are comfortable in forgetting that we are called to give our lives for others in the name of Our Lord. It is not about me or you as individuals, it is about us as the Community of the church and as compassionate humans living in society. We fear what we don’t understand, study and learn the truth about the Islamic Faith and way of life, we come from the same stock, we, the Jews and Muslims are all children of Abraham. Work, pray, and strive to bring the Peace of God to our world. fluke watson says: Comments (22) November 18, 2015 at 11:24 pm 366 times in the Bible we read a command of Fear Not, Be not afraid, Do not be afraid–the most common commandment in the Bible. What is the worst that can happen?–We die and go to heaven, supposedly a place that is much better than anyplace in this world. Jesus of Nazareth is radically nonviolent, and he says, “Follow me.” Jesus was not a Christian;” Jesus of Nazareth was a Jew. Matthew:7.12—read it. Should we kill all Christians because a huge number of Christian hate groups exist? Should we kill all German Christians because some were Nazis? Bp. Curry is right. Follow the anointed Jesus and “Do not be afraid, ” and do unto others as you would have them do unto you,’ or as the Koran advises, “Do not do to others what you would not want them to do to you.” Instead of pointing fingers, extend your hand. November 18, 2015 at 9:10 pm Fluke: At first I wondered if you were being ironic. If you are, it was too subtle for me. If our Presiding Bishop is “way off on this one”, he is in good company. The Gospel of Matthew quotes Jesus as saying “Love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you”. And while the Apostle Paul doesn’t use the word love, he does give form to that love by saying “if your enemies are hungry, feed them; if they are thirsty, give them something to drink”. The logic in loving (offering food and drink) and forgiving your enemies is that it makes it so much harder to remain enemies. It has the potential to turn enemies into friends.I am proud to say that my church recently sponsored a family from Syria to come to the US. This couple and their two young children are not my enemies. They are victims of circumstances beyond their control who have seen their old lives shattered, their dreams deferred. Now they have a chance to rebuild their lives, reimagine their hopes. And I am happy to be a small part of that process. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Curate Diocese of Nebraska Harvey Cottrell says: Patrick Andersen says: November 18, 2015 at 8:57 pm You mean Jesus is “way off,” Fluke Watson? Because those are the words of our Lord Jesus Christ. And, it is evident in Scripture that there is very little, if anything, that is “logical” about what he did and said. Yet, it works — now or later. Press Release Service November 18, 2015 at 7:38 pm Bishop Curry, that is excellent! I fully support you in doing whatever we can and should do to make love cast out fear. I have come across examples of irrational fear and have then be more fearful of these examples than of potential enemies. But I also recall meeting a woman in a country school who told me, “I have such faith that no matter what happens, God will steer in in the right path and that we will be well.” Significantly, her child was an outstanding pupil in school. Benjamin Hersman says: November 18, 2015 at 7:07 pm Please pray for the many who suffer for the misdeeds of the few. These would include, for example, the generations of Southerners who suffer verbal abuse because of views held by their ancestors, the Northerners who are viewed with suspicion because of actions by the Carpetbaggers after the Civil War, the millions of responsible gun owners who are lumped in with crazed killers, the millions of Christians who are branded with the extreme views of a small minority, and the millions of Muslims who are hated and feared because a small number of terrorists misuse the name of Islam to commit atrocities. And please pray for the people of Paris as they grieve. Rector Collierville, TN November 19, 2015 at 12:13 pm There may be no logical reason; but there is a reason. It’s Jesus. He has shown us the most excellent way. Love. Peter filled with fear and anger drew his sword and struck the soldier in the garden, and Jesus said, “Those who live by the sword, die by the sword.”I his great mountainside sermon Jesus turned the world upside down or as the Presiding Bishop told us; he really turned it right-side up. Following Christ isn’t always an intellectual pursuit or an exercise in logic (See the presiding bishops sermon on You Tube, “we need some crazy Christians”) I had the great privilege of being present when he gave that sermon. My prayer for us as Episcopalians is that we maintain our rich tradition of pursuing truth though intellect; but that we also return to our rich tradition of experiencing Christ with our hearts. It’s not always going to be logical or make sense; Jesus did not come to make life easy; he came to change this world ( through us) into the dream God has for it. I stand with Michael Curry in that dream; I pray for him and our Church. The most repeated phrase in all of the scripture is, “Fear Not” do not be afraid, before I even read this post i was singing the Catholic hymn be not afraid to myself yesterday morning, thinking about the grip fear has on our country and the world–and praying the words, “Let perfect love cast out fear”Do not be afraid Church..Bad things will happen– this is part of life–it does not make it easy–I’m not trying to oversimplify, I just want to encourage us all–Darkness cannot resist the light forever..loved ones..we know how the story ends..Pray for the Church and the World.Harvey January 22, 2016 at 4:21 pm Satin will not win! We all have fear. Some fear is faith based. We all should fear God while knowing that he loves all of us. Lovve will conquer hate. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Paul Canady says: November 19, 2015 at 8:26 am It would be easier if the news footage of refugees wasnt so obviously showing..men..many more men..who look fit and strong….and capable..of anything. Praying for us all! Featured Jobs & Calls November 18, 2015 at 4:49 pm Be not afraid OK, but love our enemies? The people who at every opportunity want you dead? No way. I think you’re way off on this one. There is absolutely no logical reason to love or even forgive these people November 19, 2015 at 8:49 pm I believe in trying times God calls us all to use our intellect in making decisions regarding enrich His kingdom. I see no rational argument opposing a temporary moratorium on these refugees if the express purpose is to simply proceed with caution in plugging these refugees into our Christian society. This is not racism or bigotry, yet an intense desire to protect Christians everywhere while also accepting as many peace loving refugees as possible. Blessings! December 4, 2015 at 5:40 pm The newsfootage wouldn’t draw as many viewers if it showed women and children who are cold and hungry with little shelter. Much better to show footage of riots that took place in other places and label them as happening now. I am not denying that there are problems; this is a huge migration. The media, however, has carefully showed us the pictures that instill fear. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Logan Miller says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Br. John Ryan, O.C.P. says: Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Middle East, November 20, 2015 at 6:40 am We don’t have to give our lives. For what? I understand giving your life for a cause. What is the cause. It is a waste of human life. Kill this enemy and give yourselves an opportunity to enrich the lives of others through your works. Don’t waste life in the name of God Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Comments are closed. December 12, 2015 at 8:33 am Hello Fluke,We are instructed to not only love our enemies but also to hate evil. So if our enemies in this context are other human beings and evil is Satan, then perhaps the instructions are the following: Love your enemies for no other reason than they are human beings; do not harbor contempt for them. Hate Satan and the evil tactic of contempt used to devalue human beings and divide us; fearlessly speak out against contempt and how Satan effectively uses it to confuse us and hide his true intent to separate all God’s people from Father Abraham’s one and only true God. Whom is the same God known to Muslims, Christians, and Jews. What better evil at Satan’s disposal to divide God’s people than contempt?Arguably, the opposite of Christian love is not hate but contempt. Our human journey together while we love all of God’s children, hate Satan, and expose Satan’s lies and tactics are lives with less fear and more power through the Holy Spirit. I am a work in progress, as we all are. Regards! Nolan McBride says: Lewis Ray says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group fluke watson says: Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Belleville, IL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET November 20, 2015 at 10:21 pm Thank you! June McClary says: Featured Events November 19, 2015 at 8:22 am Praying for us all! The Rev’d Edward Thompson says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Washington, DC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books November 20, 2015 at 12:27 pm I think this article is particularly relevant to this issue.http://www.plough.com/en/topics/community/reconciliation/learning-to-love-boko-haram November 19, 2015 at 10:27 am Following Jesus has never be easy for His path was exceedingly difficult and not an easy one to follow. But, if one is a TRUE Christian, he/she WILL indeed do their level best to “love thy neighbor as thyself” whether friend or foe for that is the second of the two Commandments set down for us by Jesus, Himself:Matthew 22:35-4035 Then one of them, which was a lawyer, asked him a question, tempting him, and saying,36 Master, which is the great commandment in the law?37 Jesus said unto him, Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy mind.38 This is the first and great commandment.39 And the second is like unto it, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself.40 On these two commandments hang all the law and the prophets.He didn’t say that it is your choice, but that it is His Holy Commandment. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC just tupper says: Submit a Job Listing Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Shreveport, LA Randy Heyn-Lamb says: December 9, 2015 at 8:25 pm Amen and amen and amen and………..AMEN!!! Too many of these right wing Christians have forgotten that we are called to be CHRISTIANS before Americans. As you said, we’ve had it easy for far too long. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab November 19, 2015 at 9:03 am “76% of these refugees are women and children.”http://lirs.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/LIRS_SyriaFactSheet.pdf karen devries says: Rector Bath, NC fluke watson says: Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Michael D. Bond says: Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT November 19, 2015 at 10:38 pm I never challenged the ‘not be afraid’ part. I challenged ‘love your enemies’ Maybe I’m not as good a Christian as you all are, maybe I can’t quote passages from the bible as well as you all can, and maybe I’m not as forgiving as I should be.You can pray for your enemies as Michael says, you can dream like Harvey does, but to try and befriend them Randy…no way. These enemies will never become your friends. They won’t give you the chance to befriend them, to negotiate, because they want you dead and if you don’t want to be dead, then the negotiations have failed. At least the Romans gave Jesus a chance to speak, to pray. These monsters won’t do that God bless all of you. You have goodness in your hearts and you mean well, but don’t be naïve and accept them as friends and hope that they somehow through the intervention of the holy spirit this too will passP.S. Rev’d I hope in your comments you were not equating your Bishop to Jesusjust tupper…you scare me dude with your comment about ‘the worst that can happen’ You need to live life to the fullest and not worry about getting to heaven. if you live your life honorably, with respect and love, things have a way of turning your way Marj Oughton says: Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Tampa, FL Thomas Hofer says: Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit an Event Listing November 19, 2015 at 9:24 am Love wins.Pray for our enemies is what we are taught to do.I am very disappointed in the governors who, in the name of safety, try to block the entry of people who need our help and love.Love wins. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Knoxville, TN Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Migration Ministries, Youth Minister Lorton, VA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Advocacy Peace & Justice, Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Nolan McBride says: Presiding Bishop addresses Syrian refugee crisis: ‘Be not afraid!’ karen devries says: Presiding Bishop Michael Curry, Posted Nov 18, 2015 last_img read more

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Anglican priest Stephen Miller recognized with seafarers’ welfare award

first_img Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 The Rev. Canon Stephen Miller has received the Dr Dierk Lindemann Welfare Personality of the Year Award in recognition of his “exceptional services for the welfare and wellbeing of seafarers.” Photo: Mission to Seafarers[Anglican Communion News Service] A regional director of the Anglican mission agency Mission to Seafarers has received the coveted Dr Dierk Lindemann Welfare Personality of the Year Award. The Rev. Canon Stephen Miller, the Anglican mission agency’s regional director in East Asia, was one of seven people to be recognized for their “exceptional services for the welfare and wellbeing of seafarers.”The awards were presented by Kitack Lim, secretary general of the International Maritime Organisation, on behalf of the International Seafarers’ Welfare and Assistance Network (ISWAN) at an event in Manila, Philippines.“It was a great honor to receive the [award for] Seafarer Welfare Personality of the year,” Miller said. “Most of us who work with seafarers each day appreciate the sacrifice that each crew member makes, in leaving family and friends for many months at sea, sometimes with long periods of no communication with home. All this to bring us the essentials we need to live our lives as we would wish.“The Mission to Seafarers is there when required, to help through good times and bad, to offer support and care, a helping hand, a listening ear. Over the last 18 years working in the ports of Rotterdam, Dubai and the UAE and now in Hong Kong I have tried to do all I can to make that sacrifice less painful for the seafarer. Working for justice and righteousness in the work place and now with projects in Philippines and Myanmar working for those things with the families of seafarers in their own homes.“The last 18 years has been a great privilege and I hope the years to come will be as fulfilling. I would like to thank all at ISWAN and those who nominated me, and I would like to dedicate the Award to the memory of Father John Van Deerlin, a Catholic priest and dear friend, who I worked with closely in Dubai for many years, who served the migrant community and in particular seafarers, who sadly died two years ago,” he said.The award was welcomed by the secretary general of the Mission to Seafarers, the Rev. Canon Andrew Wright, who said it was “richly deserved.”“His work as regional director of East Asia has been vigorous and highly effective,” Wright said. “He has worked hard to support and strengthen our extensive, established network of chaplaincy and maritime welfare. More than that, he has been characteristically innovative in developing new port work and new projects. In particular, our two new mission family projects in the Philippines and Myanmar have been ground-breaking and have already made a big difference to many lives. I congratulate him on behalf of the whole Mission to Seafarers team.” The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit a Job Listing Rector Smithfield, NC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Shreveport, LA Submit an Event Listing Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Knoxville, TN Anglican Communion, The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR By Gavin DrakePosted Jul 5, 2016 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Featured Events Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Pittsburgh, PA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Washington, DC Anglican priest Stephen Miller recognized with seafarers’ welfare award Submit a Press Releasecenter_img Rector Bath, NC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Belleville, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Albany, NY Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Rector Columbus, GA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Martinsville, VA People Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Tampa, FL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Tags Rector Collierville, TN Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Press Release Service Director of Music Morristown, NJlast_img read more

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A church invests in mental health in response to parishioners’…

first_img Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Submit a Press Release The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Featured Events TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Collierville, TN Associate Rector Columbus, GA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Rector Bath, NC A church invests in mental health in response to parishioners’ suffering A 6,400-member congregation in North Carolina has created a “wellness director” position after experiencing six suicides in five years. Rector Tampa, FL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit an Event Listing Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT center_img Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Dr. Jon Kocmond looks at photos of his family in his home office in Charlotte, North Carolina. Kocmond lost his 16-year-old son, Nathan, to suicide in the fall of 2017. He has since been active in the suicide support group at Christ Episcopal Church. Photo: Wendy Yang/Faith & Leadership[Faith & Leadership] When their teenage son Nathan took his own life, Jon and Sarah Kocmond’s pain was too heavy to bear alone. So they turned to the place where they knew they would be comforted and heard: Christ Episcopal Church in Charlotte, North Carolina — and, eventually, its Survivors of Suicide (SOS) group.“If we need love to overcome sorrow, what greater source than God?” Jon Kocmond said. “The thing that has sustained me is my faith. I’ve become closer to God and the Holy Spirit. The act of sharing stories with others, sharing grief with others, is therapeutic.”The support group was formed after the congregation was rocked by a half-dozen suicides within five years — a series of traumas that affected nearly everyone at the church, the largest Episcopal congregation in North Carolina.The experience helped spur the congregation to make mental health a top priority, inspired by Jesus’ words in the Gospel of John to a man who had been ill for 38 years: “Do you want to be made well?” (John 5:6 NRSV).In addition to the SOS group, the church has invested in mental health support and awareness in a number of ways.It has helped one member establish a nonprofit residential mental health center and another launch a one-woman crusade to educate people about bipolar disorder. It has hosted two appearances by bestselling author Brené Brown to share her message that asking for help is a sign of strength.And most significantly, the church has begun a search for a wellness director, a new full-time position that will focus on mental health as part of a holistic understanding of what it means to be well.While the trend is too new to be reflected in hard numbers, mental health advocates and faith leaders say that a growing number of houses of worship across the nation are ministering to those with mental health challenges. Few have discerned the church’s call to nurture body, soul and mind as dramatically as Christ Church.Besides offering people opportunities to share their life challenges, Christ Church seeks to equip them with information and resources. Photo: Wendy Yang/Faith & LeadershipAccording to the National Institute of Mental Health, nearly 1 in 5 U.S. adults has some form of mental illness in a given year, including depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, post-traumatic stress disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder and phobias.The poor are hardest hit: according to the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, the rate of adults with serious mental illness is highest among those with family income below the federal poverty line.That factor generally does not affect Christ Church, whose membership is largely well-to-do. But regardless of one’s affluence or status, no one is immune.And the church has a responsibility to offer help for those who are suffering, said Warren Kinghorn, a psychiatrist and theologian at Duke University Medical Center and Duke Divinity School, who speaks often to congregations about the church’s responsibility in addressing mental illness.“God cares about human suffering and calls us to attend to those who suffer,” he said.‘The silent things’The roots of Christ Church’s mental health ministry trace back to the 2008 recession. Realizing that many in the congregation were having their lives turned upside down, the church organized a Sunday morning forum called “The Wisdom of Contentment” and invited members to come and share their struggles out loud.Church leaders were stunned by the outpouring. Parishioners rose to tell their stories, not just about financial woes, but about their spiritual and emotional well-being — or lack of it.“It made our pain so public, and so widely shared,” said the Rev. Chip Edens, the rector of the 6,400-member church. “It defrosted us. It opened us up more deeply to the struggles of our members.”The Rev. Lisa Saunders, an associate rector, was struck by how eager people were — and are — to express out loud the most difficult issues in their lives. “It made us realize the impact of sharing our stories,” she said. “It made this big place seem warmer and more caring.”The focus expanded from that first gathering, as the congregation and clergy began to see the role of the church as a safe place for parishioners to share what Saunders calls “the silent things.”The Rev. Lisa Saunders offers communion during a Sunday service. Photo: Wendy Yang/Faith & LeadershipAs the congregation’s awareness of mental health needs grew, Saunders said, so did their support of programs, preaching and teaching on wellness.Besides offering people opportunities to share their life challenges, Christ Church seeks to equip them with information and resources, to direct them toward help, and to encourage them not to suffer in silence.While the initiatives are focused on the congregation, the community is welcome to attend the classes and programs. No one is turned away.The question posed in the Gospel of John — “Do you want to be made well?” — is applied broadly in this setting. Edens said the ministry isn’t based on the belief that Jesus alone can heal what ails us. God, he notes, works through many means, including health care, exercise, meditation and more.“Jesus wants to renew our minds,” Saunders said.‘What greater source than God?’Despite its growing support of mental health, the congregation was shocked by the rash of suicides. Among the dead was a 20-year-old college student, a 51-year-old businessman and father of two who was active in the church, and the Kocmonds’ son Nathan.According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the U.S. suicide rate was 14 per 100,000 — 47,000 deaths — in 2017, the year Nathan Kocmond died.Christ Church was moved to act. In 2019, the church created the SOS group, which meets twice a month for an hour and a half, longer if necessary. Saunders helps guide the conversation. The half-dozen families involved politely declined a reporter’s request to sit in, asking for privacy.But over coffee one Saturday afternoon, Jon Kocmond, a pediatrician, talked about SOS, and about his son.Nathan Kocmond, 16, died by suicide Oct. 9, 2017. He left home on a Monday and did not return. His body was discovered the following Friday, about a 90-minute drive from Charlotte. He left no note, nor did he share any warnings on social media.A junior at Providence Day School, he was an excellent student, a football player and a Boy Scout. His father said that Nathan, the middle of their three children, made friends easily.The Kocmond family smiles in their last family portrait before Nathan’s death. Photo: Courtesy of Jon Kocmond via Faith & LeadershipBut as Jon Kocmond characterizes it, multiple factors seem to have played a part in the tragedy. Eight months before his death, Nathan started showing signs of distress. He ran away briefly, and was having thoughts — though not suicidal — that disturbed his sleep.Six weeks before his death, he suffered a football-related concussion, which caused daily headaches. He had to step away from football, and he missed three weeks of school, further fraying his social network.Jon and Sarah Kocmond try not to blame any one person or factor. “We were all a part of his world,” Jon Kocmond said. “And his world failed him.”In SOS, Jon Kocmond talks about Nathan. He listens intently to others who have lost a child, spouse or other loved one. His wife, Sarah, attends, but not as often as he does.The group discusses the importance of recovering at your own pace, he said, and of not blaming yourself or feeling shame. And the importance of heeding the advice that Edens and his wife gave Kocmond: “You can’t do this without community and love.”Dr. Jon Kocmond and his wife, Sarah, lost their 16-year-old son, Nathan, to suicide in the fall of 2017. They have since been active in the church’s suicide support group. Photo: Wendy Yang/Faith & Leadership‘We belong to each other’Kinghorn, of Duke, can cite any number of passages from the Old and New Testaments about God hearing those who cry out in the night.“Jesus knew what it was to have people say, ‘You’re crazy,’” he said.From the beginning, the church has raised the question of how we relate to each other, Kinghorn said. In the 1700s and early 1800s, Quakers opened rural “retreats” for the mentally ill — forerunners of psychiatric hospitals.Psalm 13:2 asks, “How long must I bear pain in my soul?” — a challenge that individual congregations have an obligation to answer, Kinghorn said.When he speaks at churches, Kinghorn offers suggestions to put this principle into practice: Preach about mental health from the pulpit. Organize support groups. Offer classes to help people learn the warning signs. Offer information on where to find help — through pamphlets in book racks, for example, or a page on the church website. Host forums for people to tell their stories aloud. Call people with mental illness into positions of leadership and service. Sponsor direct treatment.But he also notes that there’s a difference between being included and truly belonging. He urges congregations to ask themselves whether they truly welcome the mentally ill into the life of the church and let them know they have a place in God’s home.Kinghorn said he is moved by Christ Church taking the step, unusual among congregations, of creating a suicide support group.While Scripture, he said, does not affirm suicide — our lives are God’s and not ours to take — neither does it condemn those who take their own lives. Nothing can separate us from the love of God, he said; there is grace and hope for those who die from suicide.And yet, as St. Thomas Aquinas taught, suicide leaves lasting scars in communities. “We belong to each other,” Kinghorn said.Life mattersCoping with suicide hasn’t been the only struggle for parishioners. Personal experience with mental illness has prompted two church members to action.Parishioner Beth Purdy spoke publicly for the first time at a Sunday morning forum in 2008 about her decades-long struggle with bipolar disorder, panic attacks, depression and misdiagnoses.Purdy and Saunders had feared that few would come to the gathering, called “Life Matters.” But a capacity crowd of 200 turned out.The experience emboldened Purdy to share her story at churches, mental health seminars — wherever she could. She launched her ministry as a speaker and advocate for mental health at Christ Church.Purdy believes that by speaking out about her experience, she emboldens others to come out of the shadows.Thinking back to that turning-point Sunday at Christ Church, she recalls that people seemed relieved to share their stories. “It was like a huge pressure valve was released and people could breathe when talking about mental illness,” she said.‘It’s courage’Faced with a family mental health emergency and finding nowhere to turn, Bill Blue retired early from Wells Fargo. With his wife, Betsy, he established HopeWay, a nonprofit residential mental health facility that they opened in 2016. It was unveiled at a Sunday morning forum at Christ Church, the Blues’ parish for 34 years.Today, the church refers families to HopeWay, and the facility’s medical staff has spoken at the church. The congregation has supported HopeWay financially, Blue said — including a grant to bring in Theo, a therapy dog.Extending its reach beyond its campus, HopeWay has hosted communitywide programs in uptown Charlotte featuring nationally known speakers — among them, ABC News anchor Dan Harris, who has written and spoken about mindfulness and meditation since suffering a panic attack on live TV.Bill Blue praises his church’s commitment to shatter stereotypes around mental illness. “It’s courage,” he said.The Rev. Chip Edens says God works through many means for our healing, including health care, exercise, meditation and more. Photo: Wendy Yang/Faith & Leadership‘What does it mean to live together?’Perhaps the biggest step that Christ Church has taken is to create the new staff position of wellness director. The vestry, the lay leadership body, agreed to fund the full-time position in January 2019.The ad for the position ends with these words from Romans 12:2 (NIV): “Do not conform to the pattern of this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind. Then you will be able to test and approve what God’s will is — his good, pleasing and perfect will.”The first wellness director, when he or she is hired, will serve as an advocate, educator and navigator for the congregation.The position calls for training and credentials in psychology, social work, counseling or psychiatric nursing, but rather than providing treatment, the director will triage parishioners to the right places for help. In addition to being on the church campus at least two Sundays a month, he or she will be available to respond to crises at any time.Church leaders describe the new position as a ministry of presence, charged with addressing the array of issues that contribute to a person’s health — mental and otherwise.It’s one answer to the question that Kinghorn asks congregations everywhere he goes: “What does it mean to live together as a community of people, committed to the glory of God?”This was first published in Faith & Leadership. Rector Knoxville, TN Curate Diocese of Nebraska Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Resources on mental healthNational Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-8255American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, Washington, D.C.Christ Episcopal Church, Charlotte, North Carolina: Mental health initiativesFirst Presbyterian Church, San Antonio, Texas: Pathways to Hope Conference on mental health, Aug. 23-24National Alliance on Mental Illness: Interfaith resource network FaithNetNAMI offers Spanish translation. To learn about mental health and the African American community, visit nami.org/Get-Involved/Awareness-Event. Rector Shreveport, LA Health & Healthcare New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books By Ken GarfieldPosted Jul 11, 2019 Press Release Service The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Albany, NY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit a Job Listing Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Martinsville, VA Tagslast_img read more

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National and local talent performing at Festival this Saturday

first_imgRecent Updates:Invite 20 and Tag 20 below to win 4 General Admission Tickets! First 20 Winners!Today only we are having a blowout ticket sale!Bogo tickets for $8!Family Packages for only $15!… A brief summary of The Apopka  Family, Faith, Food FestivalFor tickets, go here.Come out and enjoy Grammy Nominated, Stellar & Dove Award winning Benjah perform along with Grammy Nominated & The Voice Contestant Sisaundra Lewis.  The event is hosted by Hope & Ellis Feaster of G106.3 FM Praise. Pastor Justin Miller of Real Life will be hosting a segment on stage about UNITY for his show Real Talk that airs on Goodlife 45 Thursday’s at 9pm. Enjoy over 20 food vendors and let your kids enjoy the kid zone, at the beautiful Apopka Amphitheater.  Tickets will sell out fast so make sure to purchase yours today! Music, Food, and great fun together. Bring your chairs, blankets, and invite all of your friends and family to enjoy this great event!RulesNo outside food or drinkNo coolersNo petsNo tentsAllowedSmall tablesBlanketsFolding chairsRefund PolicyNo refund unless the event is cancelled.Food VendorsThe event director is not responsible for food truck lines, various food vendor lines may be long but let’s all have fun, listen to great music and support your local food vendors. To register to be a Food Vendor, go here.For more information please email [email protected] Please enter your name here TAGSApopka Family Faith Food Festival Previous article10 Most Popular Home Designs in 2017Next articleTotal Solar Eclipse – Time to start planning Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom Share on Facebook Tweet on Twittercenter_img You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 Please enter your comment!last_img read more

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A violent weekend in South Apopka concludes with two shootings

first_img Please enter your comment! Please turn on Hot 95.9 FM in Orlando. Give it a chance. These lyrics can change your life, or the life of one our loved ones.. I promise.. it works. God bless UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 Set Free! Reply Please enter your name here Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom 3 COMMENTS April 2, 2017 at 10:45 pm Mama Mia Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Reply So sorry to hear this bad news of more fatal shootings. Mt. Dora had some more bad things happen with juveniles burglarizing cars and a man confronted them with a baseball bat for protection, they took it away from him, and beat him badly. Things are not like they used to be in Apopka and Mt. Dora, or anywhere! No where on earth is safe anymore.center_img May God bless Devonte Taylor’s soul and his family. This stupid a s violence has got to stop… why we all gotta hate and hate and hate? Why? What’s wrong and how do we fix it? God!!! The answer IS God. It’s not just a saying, it’s the truth. We all need to be spreading the news that Christian Hip Hop and Rap is 99x better than it was years ago.. they got talent, they got positive lyrics, and those lyrics can heal souls. I promise ! _Straight Truth LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply April 3, 2017 at 9:32 am April 3, 2017 at 11:25 am You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 Set Free! Reply TAGSApopka Police DepartmentOrange County Sheriff’s OfficeShootingsouth apopka Previous articleIt’s my party and I’ll cry (foul) if I want toNext articleIn case you missed it: The Apopka news week in review Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR One man shot and killed, another shot and transported to hospitalShots rang out in South Apopka, resulting in one fatality and another person suffering gunshot wounds in two separate incidents and on two successive nights this weekend.On Friday night, the Apopka Police Department responded to shots fired on or around 10th Street in South Apopka. Upon arriving at the scene, they found a male victim with a gunshot wound lying on the ground. He was transported to a local hospital, suffering from non-life-threatening injuries. The victim was treated and released but was uncooperative with police. The APD did not release the victim’s name. The investigation is ongoing, and no details were released about the suspects. Then on Saturday night, the Orange County Sheriff’s Department responded to a home on the 1800 block of Grimke Avenue in South Apopka around 11 p.m. after receiving information about shots fired and a person down. Devonte Taylor, 25 of Apopka, was found by his father suffering a gunshot wound outside the home, according to OSCO reports. Taylor’s father transported him to Florida Hospital Apopka, where he was pronounced dead, deputies said. The investigation is ongoing, and no suspect information is available from the OCSO. No other details from the OCSO are available. Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

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Florida Autism Center serves Apopka families

first_img Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 Lauren Mackey is a staff writer for The Apopka Voice and a high school senior from Apopka. She plans to pursue a degree in Culture and Media this fall to work toward a career in journalism with a focus on social change. The Anatomy of Fear Please enter your name here Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate center_img By Lauren Mackey / TAV Staff WriterThe Florida Autism Center has a unique goal: For their students to leave their programs.Founded in 2005, the Florida Autism Center serves families with children younger than 6-years-old to 13-years-old who have autism, down’s syndrome or may benefit from ABA therapy.According to Jenn Elston, Marketing Director at the Florida Autism Center, ABA, or Applied Behavior Analysis, therapy is, “a hard science dedicated to making significant social change,” she said, “The field has a strong history of being the only scientifically validated treatment for autism and related disabilities.”The center provides early intervention, one-on-one ABA therapy, private school and summer therapy at 11 locations throughout Florida. Their Apopka location on Hunt Club Boulevard opened in January, although they plan to have their grand opening once they have about 15 families at the location.“ABA therapy is a relatively new practice, so we’re really proud that we’re able to actually go out in the community and serve the Apopka community itself,” said Elston.Elston explained that they have a strong belief in their center-based ABA therapy because it prepares kids for mainstream kindergarten by mimicking a school environment. She added that being in the Apopka community allows therapists at the center to go into the community with a child who may have an issue going to the dentist or the grocery store, and find the cause of the issue, then imitate that environment in-center to find a solution.“The whole community has just been so welcoming. We’ve had multiple businesses reach out and ask us if they can host their brochures for us, all of that, so it’s been wonderful to be a part of your guys’ community,” said Elston.The organization is rapidly expanding, with eight new locations coming soon.To learn more about the Florida Autism Center, their services and funding, visit their website or call 866-610-0580. Please enter your comment! LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply TAGSAutismFlorida Autism Center Previous articleNew island-inspired restaurant to open in MayNext articleApopka business networking group celebrates two-year anniversary Lauren Mackey RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

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Apopka Weekly Arrest Report

first_img Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate Please enter your comment! Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 APD Arrest Report ~ June 5th – June 12thThe Apopka Police Department reported the following statistics for the week ending May 22nd:Calls For Service          1,337Traffic Citations               44Crash Reports                   19The Apopka Police Department reported 26 arrests for the week ending June 12th.All of the arrests are listed here:HOPKINS, ANTONIO RASHANDA APOPKA 18 LARC-RETAIL THEFT/SHOPLIFTINGPETIT FIRSTJAMES, AIMEE C 31 BURGLARY-OF CONVEYANCE (NO PARTS)HERRERA, CHRISTINA M APOPKA 34 BATTERY-TOUCH OR STRIKE, LARC-RETAIL THEFT/SHOPLIFTINGPETIT THEFTWILLIAMS, FLOYD HENRY APOPKA 55 LARC-RETAIL THEFT/SHOPLIFTINGPETIT THEFT, TRESPASSING-FAIL TO LEAVE PROPERTY, LARC-RETAIL THEFT/SHOPLIFTINGPETIT THEFT, RESIST OFFICER-OBSTRUCT WO VIOLENCE SIMPLE ASSLT-ON OFFICER FIREFIGHTER EMT, TRESPASSING-FAIL TO LEAVE PROPERTYBAUMGARDNER, JASON MERRILL WINTER PARK 44 BATTERY-(FELONY THIRD DEGREE)ON PERSON 65 YEARS OF AGE OR OLDERVALLADARES-CASTILLO, GUSTAVO A APOPKA 24 AGGRAVATED BATTERYDOTHEROW, MICHAEL DAVIS APOPKA 55 BATTERY-TOUCH OR STRIKESOTOLONGO, SEAN APOPKA 26 OUT-OF-STATE-FUG-FUGITIVE WARRANT OF EXTRADITIONRIVERA, JERRY APOPKA 22 RESIST OFFICER-OBSTRUCT WO VIOLENCE, ROBBERY BY SUDDEN SNATCHING WO FIREARM OR WEAPONHUGHLEY, JAMES SEMAJ LAMAR APOPKA 23 OUT OF COUNTY WARRANTMALLETT, MICHAEL AUSTIN LONGWOOD 18 DAMAGE PROP-CRIM MISCH-$1000 OR MOREGRAMS ROBINSON, JULASIA JANAY APOPKA 28 MARIJUANA-POSSESS-NOT MORE THAN 20, MARIJUANA-POSSESS-NOT MORE THAN 20HEATH, JODI THOMPSON APOPKA 39 LARC-RETAIL THEFT/SHOPLIFTINGPETIT FIRST, OFFENSE 2ND DEGREE FIRST OFFENSEPUGH, CALVIN WINSLOW CLERMONT 34 CONTEMPT OF COURT-BY NOT ANSWERING, SUMMONS UNK OR MISD LEVELALLISON, CHANCE DEAN APOPKA 21 VEH THEFT-GRAND THEFT OF MOTOR VEHArrest report details provided by the Apopka Police Department The Anatomy of Fear Please enter your name here TAGSAPDApopka Police DepartmentArrest Report Previous articleAnnual report shows recent water use increase as rainfall decreasesNext article43 projects in 12 counties to benefit from cost-share dollars Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replylast_img read more

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AAA warns: Don’t Drive “Intexticated” – gives stats, jarring crash clips,…

first_img Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Please enter your comment! Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 Please enter your name here Photo by Melissa Mjoen on Unsplash You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate center_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply National Distracted Driving Awareness Month – It’s not just talking and texting on your phoneFrom AAAPeople know driving intoxicated is bad, yet many still choose to drive “intexticated”. Texting-while-driving is among the many distractions that endanger motorists on the road every day.“A distracted driver is similar to an intoxicated one,” said Mark Jenkins, spokesman, AAA – The Auto Club Group. “When a driver’s attention is diverted from the road, their reaction-time slows and lives are jeopardized.”Video Playerhttps://theapopkavoice.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/Distracted-Driving-B-Roll-3.mp400:0000:0003:49Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Top 3 Risky DistractionsCellphone useIn-vehicle technologyPassengers in the vehicleAnything that diverts attention from driving – eating and drinking, adjusting the navigation, or picking your next podcast can result in a fatal injury. Over 22 percent of distraction-affected crashes involved confirmed use of a smartphone. This underscores that while smartphone use is most frequently blamed for driver distraction, there are many other causes of distraction-affected crashes. “I personally experienced the dangers of distracted driving, earlier this year,” Jenkins continued. “While stopped in traffic, I was struck from behind by a driver who was looking at his GPS. He was driving 55 mph when he smashed into me. The impact ‘totaled’ my SUV and permanently injured my neck and back. I survived my encounter, but not everyone is so lucky.”According to 2018 data from The National Highway Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA):2,839 people were killed and 400,000 injured in motor vehicle crashes involving distracted drivers.In Florida, there were 213 documented distracted driving crashes, resulting in 231 deaths.“All it takes is one distraction and your life can change in seconds,” Jenkins continued. “No life is worth losing to distraction. Focused drivers save lives. AAA urges all drivers to pay attention and focus on the road during this National Distracted Driving Awareness month and all year long.”Sobering statisticsLooking away from the road for just two seconds doubles the risk of a crash.Five seconds of reading an email or text is like driving across a football field while blindfolded.Mental distractions last longer than you think and can cause a dangerous crash or fatality. Mental distraction can last up to 27 seconds after dialing, texting or changing the radio station.New teen drivers are 3x as likely as adults to be involved in a deadly crash. Florida has a graduated driver licensing system to help 15-year-olds gradually learn the rules of the road under less risky conditions.Despite what some drivers may think, hands-free is not risk-free. Even with your eyes on the road and your hands on the wheel, you are not safe unless your mind focuses on the drive.AAA’s Top Tips to Avoid Distractions While DrivingPrepare for your drive. Set vehicle systems like GPS, seats, mirrors, climate controls and sound systems before hitting the road. Decide on your route and check traffic conditions ahead of time. And please, finish dressing and personal grooming at home – before you get on the road.Disable or stow electronics. Never use text messaging, email, video games or internet functions, including those built into the vehicle, while driving. Stow your smartphone away, turn it to airplane mode, or activate call/text blocking features.Stay focused. Do not let anything divert your attention. Be sure to actively scan the road, use your mirrors, and watch out for pedestrians and cyclists. If you have passengers, enlist their help as a “designated texter.” Ask them to answer your calls, respond to texts and program the navigation.Take the pledge to drive distraction free or learn more about distracted driving at aaa.com/dontdrivedistracted.Florida LawProhibits hand-held cell phone use for all drivers in school and/or work zones only (5 states).Prohibits all drivers from text messaging while driving (48 states).AAA supports strengthening the distracted driving law by banning all cellphone use for drivers under the age of 18.“Distraction is the number one cause of teen driver crashes, and cellphone-use is a primary reason for it,” Jenkins said. “Tougher laws on mobile phones could help eliminate a major distraction for teens, who are still developing their skills as a new driver.”The Auto Club Group (ACG) is the second largest AAA club in North America with more than 14 million members across 14 U.S. states, the province of Quebec and two U.S. territories. ACG and its affiliates provide members with roadside assistance, insurance products, banking and financial services, travel offerings and more. ACG belongs to the national AAA federation with more than 60 million members in the United States and Canada. AAA’s mission is to protect and advance freedom of mobility and improve traffic safety. For more information, get the AAA Mobile app, visit AAA.com, and follow us on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. TAGS”Intexticated”AAADistracted Driver Awareness MonthDrivingStatisticsTextingtipsVideo Previous articleIncreased funding now available for energy bill assistance for seniorsNext articleOrange Co. Animal Services houses dog for more than 200 days, seeks an adopter for Rocket Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter The Anatomy of Fear last_img read more

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9 tips to give yourself the best shot at sticking to…

first_img Please enter your name here Shutterstock TAGSMotivationNew Year’s ResolutionsNew Years 2021Personal GrowthThe Conversationtips Previous articleNetlix has new arrivals for the New Year 2021Next articleFlorida sports wagering bills filed to spur stalled Seminole pact negotiations Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here The Anatomy of Fear Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 center_img Please enter your comment! Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply By Joanne Dickson, Edith Cowan UniversityFor many cultures, the dawn of the new year is marked not only with celebration, but also the opportunity for personal reflection and growth.But as the year progresses, our initial drive for self-betterment can falter.The good news is our tendency to give up can be circumvented. There are various ways we can strengthen our commitment to our new year’s goals.A mismatch between aim and actionsIn early 2020, my colleagues and I surveyed 182 participants to study personal goal factors that promoted well-being and sustained people’s pursuit of their most important new year’s resolution.We found 74% of participants listed their most important resolution as the same, or nearly the same, as in the previous year.More than half of the resolutions focused on either “diet” (29%) or “exercise” (24%). This suggests health-related goals tend to get rebooted each year — perhaps because New Year’s Day follows plenty of end-of-year festivities and feasting.Furthermore, despite the participants reporting a strong commitment to their listed resolution, about two-thirds gave up within one month. Other studies have shown similarly high rates for not sticking with new year’s resolutions.Generating meaning to sustain effortIf you’re wanting to set yourself a resolution for 2021, a good place to start is to reflect on the year that was.Our personal reflection on 2020, and the key lessons we took away from it, will help determine our hopes and visions for the year ahead.Due to the coronavirus pandemic, 2020 was marked by prolonged lockdowns, isolation, loss, and shifts in opportunity. But personal growth and strength can stem from such experiences, as past research has revealed.Living through difficult and stressful times can pave the way for a greater appreciation for life, deeper self-understanding, and increased personal resilience (which means being able to bounce back quicker).When setting resolutions, it’s important they’re linked to meaningful goals and values that can sustain motivation.For example, the resolution to “lose five kilos” will more likely endure in the face of obstacles, difficulties, or other competing resolutions if it’s linked to higher personal values, such as beliefs about one’s health or appearance.If you’re wondering whether your motivation to reach a certain goal will dwindle later on, look at why you want to achieve the goal in the first place. What does it really mean to you? ShutterstockOur study also found “goal flexibility”, which refers to being able to adapt to various situations, was positively associated with mental well-being. In turn, this was associated with a greater chance of sticking to new year’s resolutions.So being adaptable in the process of meeting your goals will not only improve your general well-being, but it will also help you pursue your new year’s resolutions.Tips for setting your 2021 new year’s resolutionsWhen it comes to sticking to resolutions, insight gleaned from psychology research can be distilled into several practical and easy-to-apply tips.1) Set resolutions that match your deeper valuesYour personal beliefs and hopes have a key role in sustaining your motivational impetus and keeping you focused. This form of motivation is associated with increased personal well-being.2) Try to set “new” resolutionsThis is preferable to recycling old ones. If you still want to pursue a resolution from last year, try to be more specific in your approach.3) Set resolutions as specific plansThese should account for factors such as time, place and people. Specific plans provide the mental cues needed to stick to our goals.This is because they’re also less mentally taxing than more vague or generic plans that require further thinking. For instance, consider this resolution:I will walk for at least 30 minutes around the nearby lake with my friend Sam on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday mornings.It already sets a framework that provides plenty of mental cues and strategies on which to follow up. Also, including another person in the plan also sets a greater sense of responsibility, accountability, and social enjoyment — compared with a more vague resolution such as:I’ll go on more walks this year.4) Identify and imagine your desired positive outcomeVisualizing your goals will help keep you focused on identifying the specific resources your resolution requires. It will also help mobilize sustained pursuit of the goal.5) Reward small gains along the wayEnjoying small progress gains is not only pleasurable, but it will also help to motivate you.Taking stock of how far you’ve come in the process of achieving a goal can provide the internal drive needed to see it to the end. Shutterstock6) Set resolutions you want to pursue, rather than those you think you shouldResearch consistently shows pursuing freely chosen goals that are internally motivated enhances well-being. Meanwhile, goals that are externally motivated are associated with psychological distress and are less likely to be achieved.Examples of external motivation include doing something because the situation demands it, because it might please someone else, or to avoid shame or guilt that may arise if it isn’t done.7) Be flexibleIf your resolution isn’t working for you, reset it or adjust it to make it more meaningful and/or achievable.8) Be realisticThe more realistic your resolution is, the more achievable it will be and the less likely you are to set yourself up for failure.9) Learn from past failuresInstead of engaging in self-criticism and negative self-evaluation, a positive attitude towards failed resolutions can help you do better next time.This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

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